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Title: Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light

Abstract

Spark discharges in high-pressure gas are known to emit a broadband spectrum during the first 10 s of nanoseconds. We present calibrated spectra of high-pressure discharges in xenon and show that the resulting plasma is optically thick. Laser transmission data show that such a body is opaque to visible light, as expected from Kirchoff's law of thermal radiation. Nanosecond framing images of the spark absorbing high-power laser light are presented. The sparks are ideal candidates for nanosecond, high-power laser switches.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22402432
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 22; Other Information: (c) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DATA TRANSMISSION; ELECTRIC SPARKS; LASERS; PLASMA; SPECTRA; SWITCHES; THERMAL RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION; XENON

Citation Formats

Bataller, A., E-mail: bataller@physics.ucla.edu, Koulakis, J., Pree, S., and Putterman, S. Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4902914.
Bataller, A., E-mail: bataller@physics.ucla.edu, Koulakis, J., Pree, S., & Putterman, S. Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4902914.
Bataller, A., E-mail: bataller@physics.ucla.edu, Koulakis, J., Pree, S., and Putterman, S. 2014. "Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4902914.
@article{osti_22402432,
title = {Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light},
author = {Bataller, A., E-mail: bataller@physics.ucla.edu and Koulakis, J. and Pree, S. and Putterman, S.},
abstractNote = {Spark discharges in high-pressure gas are known to emit a broadband spectrum during the first 10 s of nanoseconds. We present calibrated spectra of high-pressure discharges in xenon and show that the resulting plasma is optically thick. Laser transmission data show that such a body is opaque to visible light, as expected from Kirchoff's law of thermal radiation. Nanosecond framing images of the spark absorbing high-power laser light are presented. The sparks are ideal candidates for nanosecond, high-power laser switches.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4902914},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 22,
volume = 105,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}
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