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Title: Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

Abstract

Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shockmore » tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22392432
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: (c) 2015 U.S. Government; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; AIR; DESIGN; EXPLOSIONS; FABRICATION; GEOMETRY; SAFETY; SHOCK TUBES; SIMULATION; SPHERICAL CONFIGURATION

Citation Formats

Stewart, Joel B., E-mail: joel.b.stewart2.civ@mail.mil, and Pecora, Collin, E-mail: collin.r.pecora.civ@mail.mil. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4914898.
Stewart, Joel B., E-mail: joel.b.stewart2.civ@mail.mil, & Pecora, Collin, E-mail: collin.r.pecora.civ@mail.mil. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4914898.
Stewart, Joel B., E-mail: joel.b.stewart2.civ@mail.mil, and Pecora, Collin, E-mail: collin.r.pecora.civ@mail.mil. Sun . "Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4914898.
@article{osti_22392432,
title = {Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube},
author = {Stewart, Joel B., E-mail: joel.b.stewart2.civ@mail.mil and Pecora, Collin, E-mail: collin.r.pecora.civ@mail.mil},
abstractNote = {Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4914898},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 3,
volume = 86,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}