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Title: TWO NEW HALO DEBRIS STREAMS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

Abstract

Using photometry from Data Release 10 of the northern footprint of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we detect two new stellar streams with lengths of between 25° and 50°. The streams, which we designate Hermus and Hyllus, are at distances of between 15 and 23 kpc from the Sun and pass primarily through Hercules and Corona Borealis. Stars in the streams appear to be metal-poor, with [Fe/H] ∼ – 2.3, though we cannot rule out metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = –1.2. While Hermus passes within 1° (in projection) of the globular cluster NGC 6229, a roughly one magnitude difference in distance modulus, combined with no signs of connecting with NGC 6229's Roche lobe, argue against any physical association between the two. Though the two streams almost certainly had different progenitors, similarities in preliminary orbit estimates suggest that those progenitors may themselves have been a product of a single accretion event.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Spitzer Science Center, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365530
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 790; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DISTANCE; GALAXIES; IRON; METALLICITY; ORBITS; PHOTOMETRY; ROCHE EQUIPOTENTIALS; STAR ACCRETION; STREAMS; SUN

Citation Formats

Grillmair, C. J., E-mail: carl@ipac.caltech.edu. TWO NEW HALO DEBRIS STREAMS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/790/1/L10.
Grillmair, C. J., E-mail: carl@ipac.caltech.edu. TWO NEW HALO DEBRIS STREAMS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/790/1/L10.
Grillmair, C. J., E-mail: carl@ipac.caltech.edu. Sun . "TWO NEW HALO DEBRIS STREAMS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY". United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/790/1/L10.
@article{osti_22365530,
title = {TWO NEW HALO DEBRIS STREAMS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY},
author = {Grillmair, C. J., E-mail: carl@ipac.caltech.edu},
abstractNote = {Using photometry from Data Release 10 of the northern footprint of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we detect two new stellar streams with lengths of between 25° and 50°. The streams, which we designate Hermus and Hyllus, are at distances of between 15 and 23 kpc from the Sun and pass primarily through Hercules and Corona Borealis. Stars in the streams appear to be metal-poor, with [Fe/H] ∼ – 2.3, though we cannot rule out metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = –1.2. While Hermus passes within 1° (in projection) of the globular cluster NGC 6229, a roughly one magnitude difference in distance modulus, combined with no signs of connecting with NGC 6229's Roche lobe, argue against any physical association between the two. Though the two streams almost certainly had different progenitors, similarities in preliminary orbit estimates suggest that those progenitors may themselves have been a product of a single accretion event.},
doi = {10.1088/2041-8205/790/1/L10},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 790,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jul 20 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Sun Jul 20 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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