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Title: Radio frequency models of novae in eruption. I. The free-free process in bipolar morphologies

Abstract

Observations of novae at radio frequencies provide us with a measure of the total ejected mass, density profile, and kinetic energy of a nova eruption. The radio emission is typically well characterized by the free-free emission process. Most models to date have assumed spherical symmetry for the eruption, although for as long as there have been radio observations of these systems, it has been known that spherical eruptions are too simplistic a geometry. In this paper, we build bipolar models of the nova eruption, assuming the free-free process, and show the effects of varying different parameters on the radio light curves. The parameters considered include the ratio of the minor- to major-axis, the inclination angle, and shell thickness. We also show the uncertainty introduced when fitting spherical-model synthetic light curves to bipolar-model synthetic light curves. We find that the optically thick phase rises with the same power law (S {sub ν}∝t {sup 2}) for both the spherical and bipolar models. In the bipolar case, there is a 'plateau' phase—depending on the thickness of the shell as well as the ratio of the minor- to major-axis—before the final decline, which follows the same power law (S {sub ν}∝t {sup –3}) asmore » in the spherical case. Finally, fitting spherical models to the bipolar-model synthetic light curves requires, in the worst-case scenario, doubling the ejected mass, more than halving the electron temperature, and reducing the shell thickness by nearly a factor of 10. This implies that in some systems we have been over-predicting the ejected masses and under-predicting the electron temperature of the ejecta.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)
  3. NAF Astronomical Observatory of Padova, I-36012 Asiago (VI) (Italy)
  4. Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.P. 22860, Ensenada (Mexico)
  5. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)
  6. Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)
  7. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2 Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, L3 5RF (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22365191
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 792; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DENSITY; ELECTRON TEMPERATURE; EMISSION; ERUPTION; INCLINATION; KINETIC ENERGY; MASS; NOVAE; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; SPHERICAL CONFIGURATION; SPHERICAL MODEL; SYMMETRY; THICKNESS; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Ribeiro, V. A. R. M., Simon, T., Woudt, P. A., Chomiuk, L., Munari, U., Steffen, W., Koning, N., O'Brien, T. J., and Bode, M. F., E-mail: vribeiro@ast.uct.ac.za. Radio frequency models of novae in eruption. I. The free-free process in bipolar morphologies. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/792/1/57.
Ribeiro, V. A. R. M., Simon, T., Woudt, P. A., Chomiuk, L., Munari, U., Steffen, W., Koning, N., O'Brien, T. J., & Bode, M. F., E-mail: vribeiro@ast.uct.ac.za. Radio frequency models of novae in eruption. I. The free-free process in bipolar morphologies. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/792/1/57.
Ribeiro, V. A. R. M., Simon, T., Woudt, P. A., Chomiuk, L., Munari, U., Steffen, W., Koning, N., O'Brien, T. J., and Bode, M. F., E-mail: vribeiro@ast.uct.ac.za. Mon . "Radio frequency models of novae in eruption. I. The free-free process in bipolar morphologies". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/792/1/57.
@article{osti_22365191,
title = {Radio frequency models of novae in eruption. I. The free-free process in bipolar morphologies},
author = {Ribeiro, V. A. R. M. and Simon, T. and Woudt, P. A. and Chomiuk, L. and Munari, U. and Steffen, W. and Koning, N. and O'Brien, T. J. and Bode, M. F., E-mail: vribeiro@ast.uct.ac.za},
abstractNote = {Observations of novae at radio frequencies provide us with a measure of the total ejected mass, density profile, and kinetic energy of a nova eruption. The radio emission is typically well characterized by the free-free emission process. Most models to date have assumed spherical symmetry for the eruption, although for as long as there have been radio observations of these systems, it has been known that spherical eruptions are too simplistic a geometry. In this paper, we build bipolar models of the nova eruption, assuming the free-free process, and show the effects of varying different parameters on the radio light curves. The parameters considered include the ratio of the minor- to major-axis, the inclination angle, and shell thickness. We also show the uncertainty introduced when fitting spherical-model synthetic light curves to bipolar-model synthetic light curves. We find that the optically thick phase rises with the same power law (S {sub ν}∝t {sup 2}) for both the spherical and bipolar models. In the bipolar case, there is a 'plateau' phase—depending on the thickness of the shell as well as the ratio of the minor- to major-axis—before the final decline, which follows the same power law (S {sub ν}∝t {sup –3}) as in the spherical case. Finally, fitting spherical models to the bipolar-model synthetic light curves requires, in the worst-case scenario, doubling the ejected mass, more than halving the electron temperature, and reducing the shell thickness by nearly a factor of 10. This implies that in some systems we have been over-predicting the ejected masses and under-predicting the electron temperature of the ejecta.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/792/1/57},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 792,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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