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Title: CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA

Abstract

Inner cavities and annular gaps in circumstellar disks are possible signposts of giant planet formation. The young star HD 142527 hosts a massive protoplanetary disk with a large cavity that extends up to 140 AU from the central star, as seen in continuum images at infrared and millimeter wavelengths. Estimates of the survival of gas inside disk cavities are needed to discriminate between clearing scenarios. We present a spatially and spectrally resolved carbon monoxide isotopologue observations of the gas-rich disk HD 142527, in the J = 2-1 line of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We detect emission coming from inside the dust-depleted cavity in all three isotopologues. Based on our analysis of the gas in the dust cavity, the {sup 12}CO emission is optically thick, while {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are both optically thin. The total mass of residual gas inside the cavity is ∼1.5-2 M {sub Jup}. We model the gas with an axisymmetric disk model. Our best-fit model shows that the cavity radius is much smaller in CO than it is in millimeter continuum and scattered light observations, with a gas cavity that does not extendmore » beyond 105 AU (at 3σ). The gap wall at its outer edge is diffuse and smooth in the gas distribution, while in dust continuum it is manifestly sharper. The inclination angle, as estimated from the high velocity channel maps, is 28 ± 0.5 deg, higher than in previous estimates, assuming a fix central star mass of 2.2 M {sub ☉}.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)
  2. Millenium Nucleus "Protoplanetary Disks in ALMA Early Science," Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)
  3. UMI-FCA 3386, CNRS/INSU, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364667
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 798; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; AXIAL SYMMETRY; CARBON 12; CARBON 13; CARBON 18; CARBON MONOXIDE; CAVITIES; COSMIC DUST; EMISSION SPECTRA; IMAGES; INCLINATION; MASS; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; STARS; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Perez, S., Casassus, S., Van der Plas, G., Christiaens, V., Ménard, F., Roman, P., Cieza, L., Hales, A. S., and Pinte, C. CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/85.
Perez, S., Casassus, S., Van der Plas, G., Christiaens, V., Ménard, F., Roman, P., Cieza, L., Hales, A. S., & Pinte, C. CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/85.
Perez, S., Casassus, S., Van der Plas, G., Christiaens, V., Ménard, F., Roman, P., Cieza, L., Hales, A. S., and Pinte, C. 2015. "CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/85.
@article{osti_22364667,
title = {CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA},
author = {Perez, S. and Casassus, S. and Van der Plas, G. and Christiaens, V. and Ménard, F. and Roman, P. and Cieza, L. and Hales, A. S. and Pinte, C.},
abstractNote = {Inner cavities and annular gaps in circumstellar disks are possible signposts of giant planet formation. The young star HD 142527 hosts a massive protoplanetary disk with a large cavity that extends up to 140 AU from the central star, as seen in continuum images at infrared and millimeter wavelengths. Estimates of the survival of gas inside disk cavities are needed to discriminate between clearing scenarios. We present a spatially and spectrally resolved carbon monoxide isotopologue observations of the gas-rich disk HD 142527, in the J = 2-1 line of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We detect emission coming from inside the dust-depleted cavity in all three isotopologues. Based on our analysis of the gas in the dust cavity, the {sup 12}CO emission is optically thick, while {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are both optically thin. The total mass of residual gas inside the cavity is ∼1.5-2 M {sub Jup}. We model the gas with an axisymmetric disk model. Our best-fit model shows that the cavity radius is much smaller in CO than it is in millimeter continuum and scattered light observations, with a gas cavity that does not extend beyond 105 AU (at 3σ). The gap wall at its outer edge is diffuse and smooth in the gas distribution, while in dust continuum it is manifestly sharper. The inclination angle, as estimated from the high velocity channel maps, is 28 ± 0.5 deg, higher than in previous estimates, assuming a fix central star mass of 2.2 M {sub ☉}.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/85},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 798,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 1
}
  • In view of both the size of its gap and the previously reported asymmetries and near-infrared spiral arms, the transition disk of the Herbig Fe star HD 142527 constitutes a remarkable case study. This paper focuses on the morphology of the outer disk through ALMA observations of {sup 12}CO J = 2-1, {sup 12}CO J = 3-2, and {sup 13}CO J = 2-1. Both {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 and {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 show spiral features of different sizes. The innermost spiral arm (S1) is a radio counterpart of the first near-infrared spiral observed by Fukagawa, but itmore » is shifted radially outward. However, the most conspicuous CO spiral arm (S2) lies at the outskirts of the disk and has not been detected before. It corresponds to a cold density structure, with both brightness and excitation temperatures of order 13±2 K and conspicuous in the {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 peak-intensity map, but faint in {sup 12}CO J = 3-2. There is also a faint counterarm (S3), at a point-symmetric location of S2 with respect to the star. These three spirals are modeled separately with two different formulae that approximate the loci of density maxima in acoustic waves due to embedded planets. S1 could be fit relatively well with these formulae, compared to S2 and S3. Alternative scenarios such as gravitational instability or external tidal interaction are discussed. The impact of channelization on spectrally and spatially resolved peak intensity maps is also briefly addressed.« less
  • We utilized the new high-order 585 actuator Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO) to obtain very high-resolution visible light images of HD 142527 with MagAO's VisAO science camera. In the median seeing conditions of the 6.5 m Magellan telescope (0.''5–0.''7), we find MagAO delivers 24%-19% Strehl at Hα (0.656 μm). We detect a faint companion (HD 142527B) embedded in this young transitional disk system at just 86.3 ± 1.9 mas (∼12 AU) from the star. The companion is detected in both Hα and a continuum filter (Δmag = 6.33 ± 0.20 mag at Hα and 7.50 ± 0.25 mag in the continuum filter). This provides confirmation ofmore » the tentative companion discovered by Biller and co-workers with sparse aperture masking at the 8 m Very Large Telescope. The Hα emission from the ∼0.25 solar mass companion (EW = 180 Å) implies a mass accretion rate of ∼5.9 × 10{sup –10} M {sub sun} yr{sup –1} and a total accretion luminosity of 1.2% L {sub sun}. Assuming a similar accretion rate, we estimate that a 1 Jupiter mass gas giant could have considerably better (50-1000×) planet/star contrasts at Hα than at the H band (COND models) for a range of optical extinctions (3.4-0 mag). We suggest that ∼0.5-5 M {sub jup} extrasolar planets in their gas accretion phase could be much more luminous at Hα than in the NIR. This is the motivation for our new MagAO GAPplanetS survey for extrasolar planets.« less
  • Detailed observations of gaps in protoplanetary disks have revealed structures that drive current research on circumstellar disks. One such feature is the two intensity nulls seen along the outer disk of the HD 142527 system, which are particularly well traced in polarized differential imaging. Here we propose that these are shadows cast by the inner disk. The inner and outer disk are thick, in terms of the unit-opacity surface in the H band, so that the shape and orientation of the shadows inform on the three-dimensional structure of the system. Radiative transfer predictions on a parametric disk model allow usmore » to conclude that the relative inclination between the inner and outer disks is 70° ± 5°. This finding taps the potential of high-contrast imaging of circumstellar disks, and bears consequences on the gas dynamics of gapped disks, as well as on the physical conditions in the shadowed regions.« less
  • We present the polarization observations toward the circumstellar disk around HD 142527 by using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at the frequency of 343 GHz. The beam size is 0.″51 × 0.″44, which corresponds to the spatial resolution of ∼71 × 62 au. The polarized intensity displays a ring-like structure with a peak located on the east side with a polarization fraction of P = 3.26 ± 0.02%, which is different from the peak of the continuum emission from the northeast region. The polarized intensity is significantly weaker at the peak of the continuum where P = 0.220 ± 0.010%. Themore » polarization vectors are in the radial direction in the main ring of the polarized intensity, while there are two regions outside at the northwest and northeast areas where the vectors are in the azimuthal direction. If the polarization vectors represent the magnetic field morphology, the polarization vectors indicate the toroidal magnetic field configuration on the main ring and the poloidal fields outside. On the other hand, the flip of the polarization vectors is predicted by the self-scattering of thermal dust emission due to the change of the direction of thermal radiation flux. Therefore, we conclude that self-scattering of thermal dust emission plays a major role in producing polarization at millimeter wavelengths in this protoplanetary disk. Also, this puts a constraint on the maximum grain size to be approximately 150 μ m if we assume compact spherical dust grains.« less
  • We present Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 31 T Tauri stars (TTS) and IRAM/1.3 mm observations for 34 low- and intermediate-mass stars in the Cep OB2 region. Including our previously published data, we analyze 56 TTS and 3 intermediate-mass stars with silicate features in Tr 37 ({approx}4 Myr) and NGC 7160 ({approx}12 Myr). The silicate emission features are well reproduced with a mixture of amorphous (with olivine, forsterite, and silica stoichiometry) and crystalline grains (forsterite, enstatite). We explore grain size and disk structure using radiative transfer disk models, finding that most objects have suffered substantial evolution (grain growth, settling). About halfmore » of the disks show inside-out evolution, with either dust-cleared inner holes or a radially dependent dust distribution, typically with larger grains and more settling in the innermost disk. The typical strong silicate features nevertheless require the presence of small dust grains, and could be explained by differential settling according to grain size, anomalous dust distributions, and/or optically thin dust populations within disk gaps. M-type stars tend to have weaker silicate emission and steeper spectral energy distributions than K-type objects. The inferred low dust masses are in a strong contrast with the relatively high gas accretion rates, suggesting global grain growth and/or an anomalous gas-to-dust ratio. Transition disks in the Cep OB2 region display strongly processed grains, suggesting that they are dominated by dust evolution and settling. Finally, the presence of rare but remarkable disks with strong accretion at old ages reveals that some very massive disks may still survive to grain growth, gravitational instabilities, and planet formation.« less