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Title: ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 107146

Abstract

We present the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) continuum observations at a wavelength of 1.25 mm of the debris disk surrounding the ∼100 Myr old solar analog HD 107146. The continuum emission extends from about 30 to 150 AU from the central star with a decrease in the surface brightness at intermediate radii. We analyze the ALMA interferometric visibilities using debris disk models with radial profiles for the dust surface density parameterized as (1) a single power law, (2) a single power law with a gap, and (3) a double power law. We find that models with a gap of radial width ∼8 AU at a distance of ∼80 AU from the central star, as well as double power-law models with a dip in the dust surface density at ∼70 AU provide significantly better fits to the ALMA data than single power-law models. We discuss possible scenarios for the origin of the HD 107146 debris disk using models of planetesimal belts in which the formation of Pluto-sized objects trigger disruptive collisions of large bodies, as well as models that consider the interaction of a planetary system with a planetesimal belt and spatial variation of the dust opacity across the disk. If future observationsmore » with higher angular resolution and sensitivity confirm the fully depleted gap structure discussed here, a planet with a mass of approximately a few Earth masses in a nearly circular orbit at ∼80 AU from the central star would be a possible explanation for the presence of the gap.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  2. Department of Astronomy, Wesleyan University, Van Vleck Observatory, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Midletown, CT 06457 (United States)
  3. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)
  4. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 South Main, Houston, TX 77521-1892 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364606
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 798; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; APPROXIMATIONS; BRIGHTNESS; COSMIC DUST; DENSITY; DISTANCE; MASS; OPACITY; ORBITS; ORIGIN; PHOTON EMISSION; PLUTO PLANET; RESOLUTION; SATELLITES; SENSITIVITY; STARS; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Ricci, L., Carpenter, J. M., Fu, B., Hughes, A. M., Corder, S., and Isella, A., E-mail: lricci@astro.caltech.edu. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 107146. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/124.
Ricci, L., Carpenter, J. M., Fu, B., Hughes, A. M., Corder, S., & Isella, A., E-mail: lricci@astro.caltech.edu. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 107146. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/124.
Ricci, L., Carpenter, J. M., Fu, B., Hughes, A. M., Corder, S., and Isella, A., E-mail: lricci@astro.caltech.edu. 2015. "ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 107146". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/124.
@article{osti_22364606,
title = {ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 107146},
author = {Ricci, L. and Carpenter, J. M. and Fu, B. and Hughes, A. M. and Corder, S. and Isella, A., E-mail: lricci@astro.caltech.edu},
abstractNote = {We present the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) continuum observations at a wavelength of 1.25 mm of the debris disk surrounding the ∼100 Myr old solar analog HD 107146. The continuum emission extends from about 30 to 150 AU from the central star with a decrease in the surface brightness at intermediate radii. We analyze the ALMA interferometric visibilities using debris disk models with radial profiles for the dust surface density parameterized as (1) a single power law, (2) a single power law with a gap, and (3) a double power law. We find that models with a gap of radial width ∼8 AU at a distance of ∼80 AU from the central star, as well as double power-law models with a dip in the dust surface density at ∼70 AU provide significantly better fits to the ALMA data than single power-law models. We discuss possible scenarios for the origin of the HD 107146 debris disk using models of planetesimal belts in which the formation of Pluto-sized objects trigger disruptive collisions of large bodies, as well as models that consider the interaction of a planetary system with a planetesimal belt and spatial variation of the dust opacity across the disk. If future observations with higher angular resolution and sensitivity confirm the fully depleted gap structure discussed here, a planet with a mass of approximately a few Earth masses in a nearly circular orbit at ∼80 AU from the central star would be a possible explanation for the presence of the gap.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/124},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 798,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 1
}
  • Circumstellar disks around stars older than 10 Myr are expected to be gas-poor. There are, however, two examples of old (30-40 Myr) debris-like disks containing a detectable amount of cold CO gas. Here we present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) and Herschel Space Observatory observations of one of these disks, around HD 21997, and study the distribution and origin of the dust and its connection to the gas. Our ALMA continuum images at 886 μm clearly resolve a broad ring of emission within a diameter of ∼4.''5, adding HD 21997 to the dozen debris disks resolved at (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Modelingmore » the morphology of the ALMA image with a radiative transfer code suggests inner and outer radii of ∼55 and ∼150 AU, and a dust mass of 0.09 M {sub ⊕}. Our data and modeling hints at an extended cold outskirt of the ring. Comparison with the morphology of the CO gas in the disk reveals an inner dust-free hole where gas nevertheless can be detected. Based on dust grain lifetimes, we propose that the dust content of this gaseous disk is of secondary origin and is produced by planetesimals. Since the gas component is probably primordial, HD 21997 is one of the first known examples of a hybrid circumstellar disk, a thus-far little studied late phase of circumstellar disk evolution.« less
  • We present ALMA continuum and spectral line observations of the young brown dwarf {rho}-Oph 102 at about 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm. We detect dust emission from the disk at these wavelengths and derive an upper limit on the radius of the dusty disk of {approx}40 AU. The derived variation of the dust opacity with frequency in the millimeter (mm) provides evidence for the presence of mm-sized grains in the disk's outer regions. This result demonstrates that mm-sized grains are found even in the low-density environments of brown dwarf disks and challenges our current understanding of dust evolution in disks.more » The CO map at 345 GHz clearly reveals molecular gas emission at the location of the brown dwarf, indicating a gas-rich disk as typically found for disks surrounding young pre-main-sequence stars. We derive a disk mass of {approx}0.3%-1% of the mass of the central brown dwarf, similar to the typical values found for disks around more massive young stars.« less
  • We present H- and K{sub s}-band imaging data resolving the gap in the transitional disk around LkCa 15, revealing the surrounding nebulosity. We detect sharp elliptical contours delimiting the nebulosity on the inside as well as the outside, consistent with the shape, size, ellipticity, and orientation of starlight reflected from the far-side disk wall, whereas the near-side wall is shielded from view by the disk's optically thick bulk. We note that forward scattering of starlight on the near-side disk surface could provide an alternate interpretation of the nebulosity. In either case, this discovery provides confirmation of the disk geometry thatmore » has been proposed to explain the spectral energy distributions of such systems, comprising an optically thick disk with an inner truncation radius of {approx}46 AU enclosing a largely evacuated gap. Our data show an offset of the nebulosity contours along the major axis, likely corresponding to a physical pericenter offset of the disk gap. This reinforces the leading theory that dynamical clearing by at least one orbiting body is the cause of the gap. Based on evolutionary models, our high-contrast imagery imposes an upper limit of 21 M{sub Jup} on companions at separations outside of 0.''1 and of 13 M{sub Jup} outside of 0.''2. Thus, we find that a planetary system around LkCa 15 is the most likely explanation for the disk architecture.« less
  • The 30 Myr old A3-type star HD 21997 is one of the two known debris dust disks having a measurable amount of cold molecular gas. With the goal of understanding the physical state, origin, and evolution of the gas in young debris disks, we obtained CO line observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Here, we report on the detection of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO in the J = 2-1 and J = 3-2 transitions and C{sup 18}O in the J = 2-1 line. The gas exhibits a Keplerian velocity curve, one of the few direct measurements ofmore » Keplerian rotation in young debris disks. The measured CO brightness distribution could be reproduced by a simple star+disk system, whose parameters are r{sub in} < 26 AU, r{sub out} = 138 ± 20 AU, M{sub *}=1.8{sup +0.5}{sub -0.2} M{sub ☉}, and i = 32.°6 ± 3.°1. The total CO mass, as calculated from the optically thin C{sup 18}O line, is about (4-8) × 10{sup –2} M{sub ⊕}, while the CO line ratios suggest a radiation temperature on the order of 6-9 K. Comparing our results with those obtained for the dust component of the HD 21997 disk from ALMA continuum observations by Moór et al., we conclude that comparable amounts of CO gas and dust are present in the disk. Interestingly, the gas and dust in the HD 21997 system are not colocated, indicating a dust-free inner gas disk within 55 AU of the star. We explore two possible scenarios for the origin of the gas. A secondary origin, which involves gas production from colliding or active planetesimals, would require unreasonably high gas production rates and would not explain why the gas and dust are not colocated. We propose that HD 21997 is a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and primordial gas coexist. HD 21997, whose age exceeds both the model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest T Tauri-like or transitional gas disks in the literature, may be a key object linking the primordial and the debris phases of disk evolution.« less
  • We have conducted ALMA observations in the 1.3 mm continuum and {sup 12}CO (2-1), C{sup 18}O (2-1), and SO (5{sub 6}-4{sub 5}) lines toward L1489 IRS, a Class I protostar surrounded by a Keplerian disk and an infalling envelope. The Keplerian disk is clearly identified in the {sup 12}CO and C{sup 18}O emission, and its outer radius (∼700 AU) and mass (∼0.005 M {sub ☉}) are comparable to those of disks around T Tauri stars. The protostellar mass is estimated to be 1.6 M {sub ☉} with the inclination angle of 66°. In addition to the Keplerian disk, there aremore » blueshifted and redshifted off-axis protrusions seen in the C{sup 18}O emission pointing toward the north and the south, respectively, adjunct to the middle part of the Keplerian disk. The shape and kinematics of these protrusions can be interpreted as streams of infalling flows with a conserved angular momentum following parabolic trajectories toward the Keplerian disk, and the mass infalling rate is estimated to be ∼5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The specific angular momentum of the infalling flows (∼2.5 × 10{sup –3} km s{sup –1} pc) is comparable to that at the outer radius of the Keplerian disk (∼4.8 × 10{sup –3} km s{sup –1} pc). The SO emission is elongated along the disk major axis and exhibits a linear velocity gradient along the axis, which is interpreted to mean that the SO emission primarily traces a ring region in the flared Keplerian disk at radii of ∼250-390 AU. The local enhancement of the SO abundance in the ring region can be due to the accretion shocks at the centrifugal radius where the infalling flows fall onto the disk. Our ALMA observations unveiled both the Keplerian disk and the infalling gas onto the disk, and the disk can further grow by accreting material and angular momenta from the infalling gas.« less