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Title: CONSTRAINING THE X-RAY AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION CHEMISTRY OF THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK: EVIDENCE FOR A SUB-INTERSTELLAR COSMIC-RAY RATE

Abstract

We present an observational and theoretical study of the primary ionizing agents (cosmic rays (CRs) and X-rays) in the TW Hya protoplanetary disk. We use a set of resolved and unresolved observations of molecular ions and other molecular species, encompassing 11 lines total, in concert with a grid of disk chemistry models. The molecular ion constraints comprise new data from the Submillimeter Array on HCO{sup +}, acquired at unprecedented spatial resolution, and data from the literature, including ALMA observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +}. We vary the model incident CR flux and stellar X-ray spectra and find that TW Hya's HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission are best-fit by a moderately hard X-ray spectra, as would be expected during the ''flaring'' state of the star, and a low CR ionization rate, ζ{sub CR} ≲ 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}. This low CR rate is the first indication of the presence of CR exclusion by winds and/or magnetic fields in an actively accreting T Tauri disk system. With this new constraint, our best-fit ionization structure predicts a low turbulence ''dead-zone'' extending from the inner edge of the disk out to 50-65 AU. This region coincides with an observed concentration of millimeter grains,more » and we propose that the inner region of TW Hya is a dust (and possibly planet) growth factory as predicted by previous theoretical work.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
  2. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22364290
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 799; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCRETION DISKS; CONCENTRATION RATIO; COSMIC DUST; COSMIC RADIATION; HARD X RADIATION; IONIZATION; LIMITING VALUES; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MOLECULAR IONS; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; STARS; STELLAR WINDS; TURBULENCE; X-RAY SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Cleeves, L. Ilsedore, Bergin, Edwin A., Adams, Fred C., Qi, Chunhua, and Öberg, Karin I. CONSTRAINING THE X-RAY AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION CHEMISTRY OF THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK: EVIDENCE FOR A SUB-INTERSTELLAR COSMIC-RAY RATE. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/799/2/204.
Cleeves, L. Ilsedore, Bergin, Edwin A., Adams, Fred C., Qi, Chunhua, & Öberg, Karin I. CONSTRAINING THE X-RAY AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION CHEMISTRY OF THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK: EVIDENCE FOR A SUB-INTERSTELLAR COSMIC-RAY RATE. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/799/2/204.
Cleeves, L. Ilsedore, Bergin, Edwin A., Adams, Fred C., Qi, Chunhua, and Öberg, Karin I. 2015. "CONSTRAINING THE X-RAY AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION CHEMISTRY OF THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK: EVIDENCE FOR A SUB-INTERSTELLAR COSMIC-RAY RATE". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/799/2/204.
@article{osti_22364290,
title = {CONSTRAINING THE X-RAY AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION CHEMISTRY OF THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK: EVIDENCE FOR A SUB-INTERSTELLAR COSMIC-RAY RATE},
author = {Cleeves, L. Ilsedore and Bergin, Edwin A. and Adams, Fred C. and Qi, Chunhua and Öberg, Karin I.},
abstractNote = {We present an observational and theoretical study of the primary ionizing agents (cosmic rays (CRs) and X-rays) in the TW Hya protoplanetary disk. We use a set of resolved and unresolved observations of molecular ions and other molecular species, encompassing 11 lines total, in concert with a grid of disk chemistry models. The molecular ion constraints comprise new data from the Submillimeter Array on HCO{sup +}, acquired at unprecedented spatial resolution, and data from the literature, including ALMA observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +}. We vary the model incident CR flux and stellar X-ray spectra and find that TW Hya's HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission are best-fit by a moderately hard X-ray spectra, as would be expected during the ''flaring'' state of the star, and a low CR ionization rate, ζ{sub CR} ≲ 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}. This low CR rate is the first indication of the presence of CR exclusion by winds and/or magnetic fields in an actively accreting T Tauri disk system. With this new constraint, our best-fit ionization structure predicts a low turbulence ''dead-zone'' extending from the inner edge of the disk out to 50-65 AU. This region coincides with an observed concentration of millimeter grains, and we propose that the inner region of TW Hya is a dust (and possibly planet) growth factory as predicted by previous theoretical work.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/799/2/204},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 799,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 2
}
  • We model the production of OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} in interstellar clouds, using a steady-state photodissociation region code that treats the freezeout of gas species, grain surface chemistry, and desorption of ices from grains. The code includes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which have important effects on the chemistry. All three ions generally have two peaks in abundance as a function of depth into the cloud, one at A{sub V} {approx}< 1 and one at A{sub V} {approx} 3-8, the exact values depending on the ratio of incident ultraviolet flux to gas density. For relatively lowmore » values of the incident far-ultraviolet flux on the cloud ({chi} {approx}< 1000; {chi} = 1 = local interstellar value), the columns of OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} scale roughly as the cosmic-ray primary ionization rate {zeta}{sub crp} divided by the hydrogen nucleus density n. The H{sub 3}O{sup +} column is dominated by the second peak, and we show that if PAHs are present, N(H{sub 3}O{sup +}) {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} independent of {zeta}{sub crp} or n. If there are no PAHs or very small grains at the second peak, N(H{sub 3}O{sup +}) can attain such columns only if low-ionization potential metals are heavily depleted. We also model diffuse and translucent clouds in the interstellar medium, and show how observations of N(OH{sup +})/N(H) and N(OH{sup +})/N(H{sub 2}O{sup +}) can be used to estimate {zeta}{sub crp}/n, {chi}/n and A{sub V} in them. We compare our models to Herschel observations of these two ions, and estimate {zeta}{sub crp} {approx}4-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16}(n/100 cm{sup -3}) s{sup -1} and {chi}/n = 0.03 cm{sup 3} for diffuse foreground clouds toward W49N.« less
  • The ionization rate of interstellar material by cosmic rays has been a major source of controversy, with different estimates varying by three orders of magnitude. Observational constraints of this rate have all depended on analyzing the chemistry of various molecules that are produced following cosmic-ray ionization, and in many cases these analyses contain significant uncertainties. Even in the simplest case (H{sup +} {sub 3}), the derived ionization rate depends on an (uncertain) estimate of the absorption path length. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of inferring the cosmic-ray ionization rate using the 10830 A absorption line of metastable helium.more » Observations through the diffuse clouds toward HD 183143 are presented, but yield only an upper limit on the metastable helium column density. A thorough investigation of He{sup +} chemistry reveals that only a small fraction of He{sup +} will recombine into the triplet state and populate the metastable level. In addition, excitation to the triplet manifold of helium by secondary electrons must be accounted for as it is the dominant mechanism which produces He* in some environments. Incorporating these various formation and destruction pathways, we derive new equations for the steady state abundance of metastable helium. Using these equations in concert with our observations, we find zeta{sub He} < 1.2 x 10{sup -15} s{sup -1}, an upper limit about 5 times larger than the ionization rate previously inferred for this sight line using H{sup +} {sub 3}. While observations of interstellar He* are extremely difficult at present, and the background chemistry is not nearly as simple as previously thought, potential future observations of metastable helium would provide an independent check on the cosmic-ray ionization rate derived from H{sup +} {sub 3} in diffuse molecular clouds, and, perhaps more importantly, allow the first direct measurements of the ionization rate in diffuse atomic clouds.« less
  • Observations of H{sup +}{sub 3} in the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium have led to various surprising results, including the conclusion that the cosmic-ray ionization rate ({zeta}{sub 2}) is about one order of magnitude larger than previously thought. The present survey expands the sample of diffuse cloud sight lines with H{sup +}{sub 3} observations to 50, with detections in 21 of those. Ionization rates inferred from these observations are in the range (1.7 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1} < {zeta}{sub 2} < (10.6 {+-} 8.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1} with a mean value of {zeta}{sub 2} = (3.5{supmore » +5.3}{sub -3.0}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. Upper limits (3{sigma}) derived from non-detections of H{sup +}{sub 3} are as low as {zeta}{sub 2} < 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. These low upper limits, in combination with the wide range of inferred cosmic-ray ionization rates, indicate variations in {zeta}{sub 2} between different diffuse cloud sight lines. A study of {zeta}{sub 2} versus N{sub H} (total hydrogen column density) shows that the two parameters are not correlated for diffuse molecular cloud sight lines, but that the ionization rate decreases when N{sub H} increases to values typical of dense molecular clouds. Both the difference in ionization rates between diffuse and dense clouds and the variation of {zeta}{sub 2} among diffuse cloud sight lines are likely the result of particle propagation effects. The lower ionization rate in dense clouds is due to the inability of low-energy (few MeV) protons to penetrate such regions, while the ionization rate in diffuse clouds is controlled by the proximity of the observed cloud to a site of particle acceleration.« less
  • We present the detection of rotationally resolved electronic transitions in the OH{sup +} A{sup 3}Π–X{sup 3}Σ{sup −} (0, 0) and (1, 0) bands toward CD-32 4348, HD 63804, HD 78344, and HD 80077. These four translucent clouds have been studied in a recent Very Large Telescope/Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph observational run. In total, seven absorption features of OH{sup +} are detected, and six of them are identified here for the first time, providing a precise tool to trace OH{sup +} in translucent interstellar clouds. An improved set of line positions and oscillator strengths is compiled to support our data interpretation.more » A dedicated analysis of the observed features in individual targets yields an accurate determination of OH{sup +} column densities. The results are applied to estimate the primary cosmic ray ionization rate in the investigated translucent clouds, which yields a typical value of ∼1.0 × 10{sup −16} s{sup −1}. In addition, following this work, two of the new interstellar features recently reported by Bhatt and Cami, at ∼3572.65 and 3346.96 Å, can be identified as OH{sup +} absorption lines now.« less
  • Chemistry plays an important role in the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks, with implications for the composition of comets and planets. This is the first of a series of papers based on data from DISCS, a Submillimeter Array survey of the chemical composition of protoplanetary disks. The six Taurus sources in the program (DM Tau, AA Tau, LkCa 15, GM Aur, CQ Tau, and MWC 480) range in stellar spectral type from M1 to A4 and offer an opportunity to test the effects of stellar luminosity on the disk chemistry. The disks were observed in 10 different lines atmore » {approx}3'' resolution and an rms of {approx}100 mJy beam{sup -1} at {approx}0.5 km s{sup -1}. The four brightest lines are CO 2-1, HCO{sup +} 3-2, CN 2{sub 33/4/2} - 1{sub 22/3/1}, and HCN 3-2, and these are detected toward all sources (except for HCN toward CQ Tau). The weaker lines of CN 2{sub 22}-1{sub 11}, DCO{sup +} 3-2, N{sub 2}H{sup +} 3-2, H{sub 2}CO 3{sub 03}-2{sub 02}, and 4{sub 14}-3{sub 13} are detected toward two to three disks each, and DCN 3-2 only toward LkCa 15. CH{sub 3}OH 4{sub 21}-3{sub 1} {sub 2} and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} are not detected. There is no obvious difference between the T Tauri and Herbig Ae sources with regard to CN and HCN intensities. In contrast, DCO{sup +}, DCN, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO are detected only toward the T Tauri stars, suggesting that the disks around Herbig Ae stars lack cold regions for long enough timescales to allow for efficient deuterium chemistry, CO freeze-out, and grain chemistry.« less