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Title: Magellan adaptive optics first-light observations of the exoplanet β PIC b. I. Direct imaging in the far-red optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the near-IR with NICI {sup ,}

Abstract

We present the first ground-based CCD (λ < 1 μm) image of an extrasolar planet. Using the Magellan Adaptive Optics system's VisAO camera, we detected the extrasolar giant planet β Pictoris b in Y-short (Y{sub S} , 0.985 μm), at a separation of 0.470 ± 0.''010 and a contrast of (1.63 ± 0.49) × 10{sup –5}. This detection has a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.1 with an empirically estimated upper limit on false alarm probability of 1.0%. We also present new photometry from the Gemini Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager instrument on the Gemini South telescope, in CH {sub 4S,1%} (1.58 μm), K{sub S} (2.18 μm), and K {sub cont} (2.27 μm). A thorough analysis of our photometry combined with previous measurements yields an estimated near-IR spectral type of L2.5 ± 1.5, consistent with previous estimates. We estimate log (L {sub bol}/L {sub ☉}) = –3.86 ± 0.04, which is consistent with prior estimates for β Pic b and with field early-L brown dwarfs (BDs). This yields a hot-start mass estimate of 11.9 ± 0.7 M {sub Jup} for an age of 21 ± 4 Myr, with an upper limit below the deuterium burning mass. Our L {sub bol}-based hot-start estimate for temperaturemore » is T {sub eff} = 1643 ± 32 K (not including model-dependent uncertainty). Due to the large corresponding model-derived radius of R = 1.43 ± 0.02 R {sub Jup}, this T {sub eff} is ∼250 K cooler than would be expected for a field L2.5 BD. Other young, low-gravity (large-radius), ultracool dwarfs and directly imaged EGPs also have lower effective temperatures than are implied by their spectral types. However, such objects tend to be anomalously red in the near-IR compared to field BDs. In contrast, β Pic b has near-IR colors more typical of an early-L dwarf despite its lower inferred temperature.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]; ; ; ; ; ;  [4];  [5];  [6] more »; « less
  1. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  2. European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001 Santiago (Chile)
  3. Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)
  4. Arcetri Observatory/INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125-Firenze (Italy)
  5. Institute for Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)
  6. Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22356962
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 786; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; COLOR; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DETECTION; DEUTERIUM; GRAVITATION; HEAT EXCHANGERS; IMAGES; MASS; NEAR INFRARED RADIATION; OPTICS; PHOTOMETRY; PLANETS; PROBABILITY; SATELLITES; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; STARS; TELESCOPES; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Males, Jared R., Close, Laird M., Morzinski, Katie M., Skemer, Andrew J., Kopon, Derek, Follette, Katherine B., Hinz, Philip M., Rodigas, Timothy J., Wahhaj, Zahed, Liu, Michael C., Nielsen, Eric L., Chun, Mark, Puglisi, Alfio, Esposito, Simone, Riccardi, Armando, Pinna, Enrico, Xompero, Marco, Briguglio, Runa, Biller, Beth A., Hayward, Thomas L., E-mail: jrmales@as.arizona.edu, and and others. Magellan adaptive optics first-light observations of the exoplanet β PIC b. I. Direct imaging in the far-red optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the near-IR with NICI {sup ,}. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/786/1/32.
Males, Jared R., Close, Laird M., Morzinski, Katie M., Skemer, Andrew J., Kopon, Derek, Follette, Katherine B., Hinz, Philip M., Rodigas, Timothy J., Wahhaj, Zahed, Liu, Michael C., Nielsen, Eric L., Chun, Mark, Puglisi, Alfio, Esposito, Simone, Riccardi, Armando, Pinna, Enrico, Xompero, Marco, Briguglio, Runa, Biller, Beth A., Hayward, Thomas L., E-mail: jrmales@as.arizona.edu, & and others. Magellan adaptive optics first-light observations of the exoplanet β PIC b. I. Direct imaging in the far-red optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the near-IR with NICI {sup ,}. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/786/1/32.
Males, Jared R., Close, Laird M., Morzinski, Katie M., Skemer, Andrew J., Kopon, Derek, Follette, Katherine B., Hinz, Philip M., Rodigas, Timothy J., Wahhaj, Zahed, Liu, Michael C., Nielsen, Eric L., Chun, Mark, Puglisi, Alfio, Esposito, Simone, Riccardi, Armando, Pinna, Enrico, Xompero, Marco, Briguglio, Runa, Biller, Beth A., Hayward, Thomas L., E-mail: jrmales@as.arizona.edu, and and others. Thu . "Magellan adaptive optics first-light observations of the exoplanet β PIC b. I. Direct imaging in the far-red optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the near-IR with NICI {sup ,}". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/786/1/32.
@article{osti_22356962,
title = {Magellan adaptive optics first-light observations of the exoplanet β PIC b. I. Direct imaging in the far-red optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the near-IR with NICI {sup ,}},
author = {Males, Jared R. and Close, Laird M. and Morzinski, Katie M. and Skemer, Andrew J. and Kopon, Derek and Follette, Katherine B. and Hinz, Philip M. and Rodigas, Timothy J. and Wahhaj, Zahed and Liu, Michael C. and Nielsen, Eric L. and Chun, Mark and Puglisi, Alfio and Esposito, Simone and Riccardi, Armando and Pinna, Enrico and Xompero, Marco and Briguglio, Runa and Biller, Beth A. and Hayward, Thomas L., E-mail: jrmales@as.arizona.edu and and others},
abstractNote = {We present the first ground-based CCD (λ < 1 μm) image of an extrasolar planet. Using the Magellan Adaptive Optics system's VisAO camera, we detected the extrasolar giant planet β Pictoris b in Y-short (Y{sub S} , 0.985 μm), at a separation of 0.470 ± 0.''010 and a contrast of (1.63 ± 0.49) × 10{sup –5}. This detection has a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.1 with an empirically estimated upper limit on false alarm probability of 1.0%. We also present new photometry from the Gemini Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager instrument on the Gemini South telescope, in CH {sub 4S,1%} (1.58 μm), K{sub S} (2.18 μm), and K {sub cont} (2.27 μm). A thorough analysis of our photometry combined with previous measurements yields an estimated near-IR spectral type of L2.5 ± 1.5, consistent with previous estimates. We estimate log (L {sub bol}/L {sub ☉}) = –3.86 ± 0.04, which is consistent with prior estimates for β Pic b and with field early-L brown dwarfs (BDs). This yields a hot-start mass estimate of 11.9 ± 0.7 M {sub Jup} for an age of 21 ± 4 Myr, with an upper limit below the deuterium burning mass. Our L {sub bol}-based hot-start estimate for temperature is T {sub eff} = 1643 ± 32 K (not including model-dependent uncertainty). Due to the large corresponding model-derived radius of R = 1.43 ± 0.02 R {sub Jup}, this T {sub eff} is ∼250 K cooler than would be expected for a field L2.5 BD. Other young, low-gravity (large-radius), ultracool dwarfs and directly imaged EGPs also have lower effective temperatures than are implied by their spectral types. However, such objects tend to be anomalously red in the near-IR compared to field BDs. In contrast, β Pic b has near-IR colors more typical of an early-L dwarf despite its lower inferred temperature.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/786/1/32},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 786,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
  • We utilized the new high-order (250-378 mode) Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO) to obtain very high spatial resolution observations in ''visible light'' with MagAO's VisAO CCD camera. In the good-median seeing conditions of Magellan (0.''5-0.''7), we find MagAO delivers individual short exposure images as good as 19 mas optical resolution. Due to telescope vibrations, long exposure (60 s) r' (0.63 {mu}m) images are slightly coarser at FWHM = 23-29 mas (Strehl {approx}28%) with bright (R < 9 mag) guide stars. These are the highest resolution filled-aperture images published to date. Images of the young ({approx}1 Myr) Orion Trapezium {theta}{sup 1}more » Ori A, B, and C cluster members were obtained with VisAO. In particular, the 32 mas binary {theta}{sup 1} Ori C{sub 1} C{sub 2} was easily resolved in non-interferometric images for the first time. The relative positions of the bright trapezium binary stars were measured with {approx}0.6-5 mas accuracy. We are now sensitive to relative proper motions of just {approx}0.2 mas yr{sup -1} ({approx}0.4 km s{sup -1} at 414 pc)-this is a {approx}2-10 Multiplication-Sign improvement in orbital velocity accuracy compared to previous efforts. For the first time, we see clear motion of the barycenter of {theta}{sup 1} Ori B{sub 2} B{sub 3} about {theta}{sup 1} Ori B{sub 1}. All five members of the {theta}{sup 1} Ori B system appear likely to be a gravitationally bound ''mini cluster'', but we find that not all the orbits can be both circular and co-planar. The lowest mass member of the {theta}{sup 1} Ori B system (B{sub 4}; mass {approx}0.2 M{sub Sun }) has a very clearly detected motion (at 4.1 {+-} 1.3 km s{sup -1}; correlation = 99.9%) w.r.t. B{sub 1}. Previous work has suggested that B{sub 4} and B{sub 3} are on long-term unstable orbits and will be ejected from this ''mini cluster''. However, our new ''baseline'' model of the {theta}{sup 1} Ori B system suggests a more hierarchical system than previously thought, and so the ejection of B{sub 4} may not occur for many orbits, and B{sub 3} may be stable against ejection in the long-term. This ''ejection'' process of the lowest mass member of a ''mini cluster'' could play a major role in the formation of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs.« less
  • We present high-resolution adaptive optics (AO) corrected images of the silhouette disk Orion 218-354 taken with Magellan AO (MagAO) and its visible light camera, VisAO, in simultaneous differential imaging mode at Hα. This is the first image of a circumstellar disk seen in silhouette with AO and is among the first visible light AO results in the literature. We derive the disk extent, geometry, intensity, and extinction profiles and find, in contrast with previous work, that the disk is likely optically thin at Hα. Our data provide an estimate of the column density in primitive, ISM-like grains as a functionmore » of radius in the disk. We estimate that only ∼10% of the total submillimeter derived disk mass lies in primitive, unprocessed grains. We use our data, Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling, and previous results from the literature to make the first self-consistent multiwavelength model of Orion 218-354. We find that we are able to reproduce the 1-1000 μm spectral energy distribution with a ∼2-540 AU disk of the size, geometry, small versus large grain proportion, and radial mass profile indicated by our data. This inner radius is a factor of ∼15 larger than the sublimation radius of the disk, suggesting that it is likely cleared in the very interior.« less
  • We present new astrometry for the young (12-21 Myr) exoplanet β Pictoris b taken with the Gemini/NICI and Magellan/MagAO instruments between 2009 and 2012. The high dynamic range of our observations allows us to measure the relative position of β Pic b with respect to its primary star with greater accuracy than previous observations. Based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, we find the planet has an orbital semi-major axis of 9.1{sub −0.5}{sup +5.3} AU and orbital eccentricity <0.15 at 68% confidence (with 95% confidence intervals of 8.2-48 AU and 0.00-0.82 for semi-major axis and eccentricity, respectively, due tomore » a long narrow degenerate tail between the two). We find that the planet has reached its maximum projected elongation, enabling higher precision determination of the orbital parameters than previously possible, and that the planet's projected separation is currently decreasing. With unsaturated data of the entire β Pic system (primary star, planet, and disk) obtained thanks to NICI's semi-transparent focal plane mask, we are able to tightly constrain the relative orientation of the circumstellar components. We find the orbital plane of the planet lies between the inner and outer disks: the position angle (P.A.) of nodes for the planet's orbit (211.8 ± 0.°3) is 7.4σ greater than the P.A. of the spine of the outer disk and 3.2σ less than the warped inner disk P.A., indicating the disk is not collisionally relaxed. Finally, for the first time we are able to dynamically constrain the mass of the primary star β Pic to 1.76{sub −0.17}{sup +0.18} M {sub ☉}.« less
  • The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 43 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designedmore » for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from ≈0.''15 to 2.''5 separation, with magnitude differences up to Δm ≈ 6. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% ± 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured planetary radius. We discuss several Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are 'coincident multiple' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we find 98% confidence evidence that short-period giant planets are two to three times more likely than longer-period planets to be found in wide stellar binaries.« less
  • The results of an adaptive optics survey of exoplanet host stars for stellar companions are presented. We used the Advanced Electro-Optical System telescope and its adaptive optics system to collect deep images of the stars in the I band. Sixty-two exoplanet host stars were observed and fifteen multiple star systems were resolved. Of these eight are known multiples, while seven are new candidate binaries. For all binaries, we measured the relative astrometry of the pair and the differential magnitude in the I band. We improved the orbits of HD 19994 and {tau} Boo. These observations will provide improved statistics onmore » the duplicity of exoplanet host stars and provide an increased understanding of the dynamics of known binary star exoplanet hosts.« less