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Title: Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human phosphate-binding protein

Abstract

The purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported. HPBP is a new human apoprotein that is absent from the genomic database and is the first phosphate transporter characterized in human plasma. Human phosphate-binding protein (HPBP) was serendipitously discovered by crystallization and X-ray crystallography. HPBP belongs to a eukaryotic protein family named DING that is systematically absent from the genomic database. This apoprotein of 38 kDa copurifies with the HDL-associated apoprotein paraoxonase (PON1) and binds inorganic phosphate. HPBP is the first identified transporter capable of binding phosphate ions in human plasma. Thus, it may be regarded as a predictor of phosphate-related diseases such as atherosclerosis. In addition, HPBP may be a potential therapeutic protein for the treatment of such diseases. Here, the purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [2];  [1];  [2];  [4];  [4]
  1. Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France)
  2. Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France)
  3. Laboratoire de Cristallographie Macromoléculaire, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France)
  4. (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22356250
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Acta Crystallographica. Section F; Journal Volume: 62; Journal Issue: Pt 1; Other Information: PMCID: PMC2150935; PMID: 16511265; PUBLISHER-ID: pu5112; OAI: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:2150935; Copyright (c) International Union of Crystallography 2006; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CRYSTALLIZATION; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; IONS; PHOSPHATES; PLASMA; POTENTIALS; PROTEINS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Contreras-Martel, Carlos, Carpentier, Philippe, Morales, Renaud, Renault, Frédérique, Chesne-Seck, Marie-Laure, Rochu, Daniel, Masson, Patrick, Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos, Chabrière, Eric, E-mail: eric.chabriere@lcm3b.uhp-nancy.fr, Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, and Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human phosphate-binding protein. United Kingdom: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1107/S1744309105041461.
Contreras-Martel, Carlos, Carpentier, Philippe, Morales, Renaud, Renault, Frédérique, Chesne-Seck, Marie-Laure, Rochu, Daniel, Masson, Patrick, Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos, Chabrière, Eric, E-mail: eric.chabriere@lcm3b.uhp-nancy.fr, Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, & Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human phosphate-binding protein. United Kingdom. doi:10.1107/S1744309105041461.
Contreras-Martel, Carlos, Carpentier, Philippe, Morales, Renaud, Renault, Frédérique, Chesne-Seck, Marie-Laure, Rochu, Daniel, Masson, Patrick, Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos, Chabrière, Eric, E-mail: eric.chabriere@lcm3b.uhp-nancy.fr, Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, and Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble. Sun . "Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human phosphate-binding protein". United Kingdom. doi:10.1107/S1744309105041461.
@article{osti_22356250,
title = {Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human phosphate-binding protein},
author = {Contreras-Martel, Carlos and Carpentier, Philippe and Morales, Renaud and Renault, Frédérique and Chesne-Seck, Marie-Laure and Rochu, Daniel and Masson, Patrick and Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos and Chabrière, Eric, E-mail: eric.chabriere@lcm3b.uhp-nancy.fr and Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy and Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble},
abstractNote = {The purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported. HPBP is a new human apoprotein that is absent from the genomic database and is the first phosphate transporter characterized in human plasma. Human phosphate-binding protein (HPBP) was serendipitously discovered by crystallization and X-ray crystallography. HPBP belongs to a eukaryotic protein family named DING that is systematically absent from the genomic database. This apoprotein of 38 kDa copurifies with the HDL-associated apoprotein paraoxonase (PON1) and binds inorganic phosphate. HPBP is the first identified transporter capable of binding phosphate ions in human plasma. Thus, it may be regarded as a predictor of phosphate-related diseases such as atherosclerosis. In addition, HPBP may be a potential therapeutic protein for the treatment of such diseases. Here, the purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported.},
doi = {10.1107/S1744309105041461},
journal = {Acta Crystallographica. Section F},
number = Pt 1,
volume = 62,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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