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Title: Determining the refractive index of shocked [100] lithium fluoride to the limit of transmissibility

Abstract

Lithium fluoride (LiF) is a common window material used in shock- and ramp-compression experiments because it displays a host of positive attributes in these applications. Most commonly, it is used to maintain stress at an interface and velocimetry techniques are used to record the particle velocity at that interface. In this application, LiF remains transparent to stresses up to 200 GPa. In this stress range, LiF has an elastic-plastic response with a very low (<0.5 GPa) elastic precursor and exhibits no known solid-solid phase transformations. However, because the density dependence of the refractive index of LiF does not follow the Gladstone-Dale relation, the measured particle velocity at this interface is not the true particle velocity and must be corrected. For that reason, the measured velocity is often referred to as the apparent velocity in these types of experiments. In this article, we describe a series of shock-compression experiments that have been performed to determine the refractive index of LiF at the two most commonly used wavelengths (532 nm and 1550 nm) between 35 and 200 GPa to high precision. A modified form of the Gladstone-Dale relation was found to work best to fit the determined values of refractive index. In addition, we provide a directmore » relationship between the apparent and true particle velocity to correct experimentally obtained wave profiles by others using these velocimetry techniques.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)
  2. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22308700
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 116; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: (c) 2014 Author(s); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ACCURACY; COMPRESSION; INTERFACES; LITHIUM FLUORIDES; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PLASTICS; PRESSURE RANGE GIGA PA; REFRACTIVE INDEX; SOLIDS; STRESSES

Citation Formats

Rigg, P. A., E-mail: prigg@lanl.gov, Scharff, R. J., Hixson, R. S., and Knudson, M. D. Determining the refractive index of shocked [100] lithium fluoride to the limit of transmissibility. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4890714.
Rigg, P. A., E-mail: prigg@lanl.gov, Scharff, R. J., Hixson, R. S., & Knudson, M. D. Determining the refractive index of shocked [100] lithium fluoride to the limit of transmissibility. United States. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4890714
Rigg, P. A., E-mail: prigg@lanl.gov, Scharff, R. J., Hixson, R. S., and Knudson, M. D. Mon . "Determining the refractive index of shocked [100] lithium fluoride to the limit of transmissibility". United States. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4890714.
@article{osti_22308700,
title = {Determining the refractive index of shocked [100] lithium fluoride to the limit of transmissibility},
author = {Rigg, P. A., E-mail: prigg@lanl.gov and Scharff, R. J. and Hixson, R. S. and Knudson, M. D.},
abstractNote = {Lithium fluoride (LiF) is a common window material used in shock- and ramp-compression experiments because it displays a host of positive attributes in these applications. Most commonly, it is used to maintain stress at an interface and velocimetry techniques are used to record the particle velocity at that interface. In this application, LiF remains transparent to stresses up to 200 GPa. In this stress range, LiF has an elastic-plastic response with a very low (<0.5 GPa) elastic precursor and exhibits no known solid-solid phase transformations. However, because the density dependence of the refractive index of LiF does not follow the Gladstone-Dale relation, the measured particle velocity at this interface is not the true particle velocity and must be corrected. For that reason, the measured velocity is often referred to as the apparent velocity in these types of experiments. In this article, we describe a series of shock-compression experiments that have been performed to determine the refractive index of LiF at the two most commonly used wavelengths (532 nm and 1550 nm) between 35 and 200 GPa to high precision. A modified form of the Gladstone-Dale relation was found to work best to fit the determined values of refractive index. In addition, we provide a direct relationship between the apparent and true particle velocity to correct experimentally obtained wave profiles by others using these velocimetry techniques.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4890714},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22308700}, journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = 3,
volume = 116,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {7}
}