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Title: Proinflammatory adipokine leptin mediates disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane-induced early steatohepatitic injury in obesity

Abstract

Today's developed world faces a major public health challenge in the rise in the obese population and the increased incidence in fatty liver disease. There is a strong association among diet induced obesity, fatty liver disease and development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis but the environmental link to disease progression remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that in obesity, early steatohepatitic lesions induced by the water disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane are mediated by increased oxidative stress and leptin which act in synchrony to potentiate disease progression. Low acute exposure to bromodichloromethane (BDCM), in diet-induced obesity produced oxidative stress as shown by increased lipid peroxidation, protein free radical and nitrotyrosine formation and elevated leptin levels. Exposed obese mice showed histopathological signs of early steatohepatitic injury and necrosis. Spontaneous knockout mice for leptin or systemic leptin receptor knockout mice had significantly decreased oxidative stress and TNF-α levels. Co-incubation of leptin and BDCM caused Kupffer cell activation as shown by increased MCP-1 release and NADPH oxidase membrane assembly, a phenomenon that was decreased in Kupffer cells isolated from leptin receptor knockout mice. In obese mice that were BDCM-exposed, livers showed a significant increase in Kupffer cell activation marker CD68 and, increased necrosis as assessed by levels ofmore » isocitrate dehydrogenase, events that were decreased in the absence of leptin or its receptor. In conclusion, our results show that exposure to the disinfection byproduct BDCM in diet-induced obesity augments steatohepatitic injury by potentiating the effects of leptin on oxidative stress, Kupffer cell activation and cell death in the liver. - Highlights: ► BDCM acute exposure sensitizes liver to increased free radical stress in obesity. ► BDCM-induced higher leptin contributes to early steatohepatitic lesions. ► Increased leptin mediates protein radical and 3-nitrotyrosine formation. ► BDCM exposure in obesity activates Kupffer cells and NADPH oxidase. ► BDCM/leptin synergy promotes necrotic cell-death and augments steatohepatitis.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [1]
  1. Environmental Health and Disease Laboratory, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)
  2. Free Radical Metabolism Group, Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)
  3. Inorganic Toxicology Group, National Toxicology Program Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22285322
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 269; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; APOPTOSIS; DIET; INJURIES; LEPTIN; LIVER; METABOLIC DISEASES; MICE; NECROSIS; OXIDASES; RECEPTORS; RETICULOENDOTHELIAL SYSTEM; TYROSINE

Citation Formats

Das, Suvarthi, Kumar, Ashutosh, Seth, Ratanesh Kumar, Tokar, Erik J., Kadiiska, Maria B., Waalkes, Michael P., Mason, Ronald P., and Chatterjee, Saurabh, E-mail: schatt@mailbox.sc.edu. Proinflammatory adipokine leptin mediates disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane-induced early steatohepatitic injury in obesity. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2013.02.003.
Das, Suvarthi, Kumar, Ashutosh, Seth, Ratanesh Kumar, Tokar, Erik J., Kadiiska, Maria B., Waalkes, Michael P., Mason, Ronald P., & Chatterjee, Saurabh, E-mail: schatt@mailbox.sc.edu. Proinflammatory adipokine leptin mediates disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane-induced early steatohepatitic injury in obesity. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2013.02.003.
Das, Suvarthi, Kumar, Ashutosh, Seth, Ratanesh Kumar, Tokar, Erik J., Kadiiska, Maria B., Waalkes, Michael P., Mason, Ronald P., and Chatterjee, Saurabh, E-mail: schatt@mailbox.sc.edu. 2013. "Proinflammatory adipokine leptin mediates disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane-induced early steatohepatitic injury in obesity". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TAAP.2013.02.003.
@article{osti_22285322,
title = {Proinflammatory adipokine leptin mediates disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane-induced early steatohepatitic injury in obesity},
author = {Das, Suvarthi and Kumar, Ashutosh and Seth, Ratanesh Kumar and Tokar, Erik J. and Kadiiska, Maria B. and Waalkes, Michael P. and Mason, Ronald P. and Chatterjee, Saurabh, E-mail: schatt@mailbox.sc.edu},
abstractNote = {Today's developed world faces a major public health challenge in the rise in the obese population and the increased incidence in fatty liver disease. There is a strong association among diet induced obesity, fatty liver disease and development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis but the environmental link to disease progression remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that in obesity, early steatohepatitic lesions induced by the water disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane are mediated by increased oxidative stress and leptin which act in synchrony to potentiate disease progression. Low acute exposure to bromodichloromethane (BDCM), in diet-induced obesity produced oxidative stress as shown by increased lipid peroxidation, protein free radical and nitrotyrosine formation and elevated leptin levels. Exposed obese mice showed histopathological signs of early steatohepatitic injury and necrosis. Spontaneous knockout mice for leptin or systemic leptin receptor knockout mice had significantly decreased oxidative stress and TNF-α levels. Co-incubation of leptin and BDCM caused Kupffer cell activation as shown by increased MCP-1 release and NADPH oxidase membrane assembly, a phenomenon that was decreased in Kupffer cells isolated from leptin receptor knockout mice. In obese mice that were BDCM-exposed, livers showed a significant increase in Kupffer cell activation marker CD68 and, increased necrosis as assessed by levels of isocitrate dehydrogenase, events that were decreased in the absence of leptin or its receptor. In conclusion, our results show that exposure to the disinfection byproduct BDCM in diet-induced obesity augments steatohepatitic injury by potentiating the effects of leptin on oxidative stress, Kupffer cell activation and cell death in the liver. - Highlights: ► BDCM acute exposure sensitizes liver to increased free radical stress in obesity. ► BDCM-induced higher leptin contributes to early steatohepatitic lesions. ► Increased leptin mediates protein radical and 3-nitrotyrosine formation. ► BDCM exposure in obesity activates Kupffer cells and NADPH oxidase. ► BDCM/leptin synergy promotes necrotic cell-death and augments steatohepatitis.},
doi = {10.1016/J.TAAP.2013.02.003},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 3,
volume = 269,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 6
}
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