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Title: Treatment of Bottled Liquid Waste During Remediation of the Hanford 618-10 Burial Ground - 13001

Abstract

A problematic waste form encountered during remediation of the Hanford Site 618-10 burial ground consists of bottled aqueous waste potentially contaminated with regulated metals. The liquid waste requires stabilization prior to landfill disposal. Prior remediation activities at other Hanford burial grounds resulted in a standard process for sampling and analyzing liquid waste using manual methods. Due to the highly dispersible characteristics of alpha contamination, and the potential for shock sensitive chemicals, a different method for bottle processing was needed for the 618-10 burial ground. Discussions with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to development of a modified approach. The modified approach involves treatment of liquid waste in bottles, up to one gallon per bottle, in a tray or box within the excavation of the remediation site. Bottles are placed in the box, covered with soil and fixative, crushed, and mixed with a Portland cement grout. The potential hazards of the liquid waste preclude sampling prior to treatment. Post treatment verification sampling is performed to demonstrate compliance with land disposal restrictions and disposal facility acceptance criteria. (authors)

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9-332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22224815
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-13-WM-13001
TRN: US14V0248045770
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2013: Waste Management Conference: International collaboration and continuous improvement, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 24-28 Feb 2013; Other Information: Country of input: France; 11 refs.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; CONTAMINATION; EXCAVATION; GROUTING; LIQUID WASTES; PORTLAND CEMENT; REMEDIAL ACTION; SAMPLING; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SOILS; US EPA; WASTE FORMS

Citation Formats

Faulk, Darrin E., Pearson, Chris M., Vedder, Barry L., and Martin, David W. Treatment of Bottled Liquid Waste During Remediation of the Hanford 618-10 Burial Ground - 13001. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Faulk, Darrin E., Pearson, Chris M., Vedder, Barry L., & Martin, David W. Treatment of Bottled Liquid Waste During Remediation of the Hanford 618-10 Burial Ground - 13001. United States.
Faulk, Darrin E., Pearson, Chris M., Vedder, Barry L., and Martin, David W. 2013. "Treatment of Bottled Liquid Waste During Remediation of the Hanford 618-10 Burial Ground - 13001". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_22224815,
title = {Treatment of Bottled Liquid Waste During Remediation of the Hanford 618-10 Burial Ground - 13001},
author = {Faulk, Darrin E. and Pearson, Chris M. and Vedder, Barry L. and Martin, David W.},
abstractNote = {A problematic waste form encountered during remediation of the Hanford Site 618-10 burial ground consists of bottled aqueous waste potentially contaminated with regulated metals. The liquid waste requires stabilization prior to landfill disposal. Prior remediation activities at other Hanford burial grounds resulted in a standard process for sampling and analyzing liquid waste using manual methods. Due to the highly dispersible characteristics of alpha contamination, and the potential for shock sensitive chemicals, a different method for bottle processing was needed for the 618-10 burial ground. Discussions with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to development of a modified approach. The modified approach involves treatment of liquid waste in bottles, up to one gallon per bottle, in a tray or box within the excavation of the remediation site. Bottles are placed in the box, covered with soil and fixative, crushed, and mixed with a Portland cement grout. The potential hazards of the liquid waste preclude sampling prior to treatment. Post treatment verification sampling is performed to demonstrate compliance with land disposal restrictions and disposal facility acceptance criteria. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 7
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Under the U.S. Department of Energy's River Corridor Closure Project, Washington Closure Hanford has completed remediation of more than 10 mixed low-level waste burial grounds in the 100 and 300 Areas of the Hanford Site. The records of decision for the burial grounds required excavation, characterization, and transport of contaminated material to a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976-compliant hazardous waste landfill. This paper discusses a sample of the anomalous waste found during remediation and provides an overview of the waste excavation activities. The 100 Area burial grounds received plutonium production reactor waste and waste associated with various testmore » programs. Examples of 100 Area anomalies include spent nuclear fuel, elemental mercury, reactor hardware, and the remains of animals used in testing the effects of radionuclides on living organisms. The 300 Area burial grounds received waste from research and development laboratories and fuel manufacturing operations. Of the seven 300 Area burial grounds remediated to date, the most challenging has been the 618-2 Burial Ground. It presented significant challenges because of the potential for airborne alpha contamination and the discovery of plutonium in an isotopically pure form. Anomalies encountered in the 618-2 Burial Ground included a combination safe that contained gram quantities of plutonium, miscellaneous containers of unknown liquids, and numerous types of shielded shipping casks. Information presented in this paper will be an aid to those involved in remediation activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy complex and at other nuclear waste disposal sites. (authors)« less
  • The 618-10 Burial Ground was in operation from 1954 to 1963 and consists of 94 vertical pipe disposal units (VPUs) and 12 solid waste disposal trenches. Remediation of the trenches began in March of 2011 under the River Corridor Closure Contract (RCCC)a. This work was considered to be high risk because the trenches are known to contain a large radiological inventory and have the potential to release airborne contaminants. Remediation is being performed without a containment structure by using a combination of engineering controls and monitoring equipment. The engineering controls include storing material below grade using a surge trench, themore » application of soil fixatives, and applying material storage limits. The use of radiological and chemical monitoring equipment is also used to provide near real-time information to guide remediation activities and limit contact of waste until risks can be evaluated. Remediation of the trenches is progressing without any significant personnel or environmental issues. (authors)« less
  • The Hanford burial grounds contains a broad spectrum of low activity radioactive wastes, transuranic (TRU) wastes, and hazardous wastes including fission products, byproduct material (thorium and uranium), plutonium and laboratory chemicals. A passive neutron non-destructive assay technique has been developed for characterization of shielded concreted drums exhumed from the burial grounds. This method facilitates the separation of low activity radiological waste containers from TRU waste containers exhumed from the burial grounds. Two identical total neutron counting systems have been deployed, each consisting of He-3 detectors surrounded by a polyethylene moderator. The counts are processed through a statistical filter that removesmore » outliers in order to suppress cosmic spallation events and electronic noise. Upon completion of processing, a 'GO / NO GO' signal is provided to the operator based on a threshold level equivalent to 0.5 grams of weapons grade plutonium in the container being evaluated. This approach allows instantaneous decisions to be made on how to proceed with the waste. The counting systems have been set up using initial on-site measurements (neutron emitting standards loaded into surrogate waste containers) combined with Monte Carlo modeling techniques. The benefit of this approach is to allow the systems to extend their measurement ranges, in terms of applicable matrix types and container sizes, with minimal interruption to the operations at the burial grounds. (authors)« less
  • A performance assessment analysis is being performed at the Hanford Site to support the disposal of low-level waste. The analysis is required to achieve compliance with US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A, which states that a performance assessment analysis be submitted and approved for a particular disposal facility. Performance objectives defined in the order and other informal guidance are used to define the types of analyses and associated data collection tasks that must be completed to produce a satisfactory analysis. In this paper, the types of tasks being conducted at the Hanford Site are discussed and progress made in differentmore » areas is summarized.« less
  • A performance assessment analysis is being performed at the Hanford Site to support the disposal of low-level waste. The analysis is required to achieve compliance with US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A, which states that a performance assessment analysis be submitted and approved for a particular disposal facility. Performance objectives defined in the order and other informal guidance are used to define the types of analyses and associated data collection tasks that must be completed to produce a satisfactory analysis. In this paper, the types of tasks being conducted at the Hanford Site are discussed and progress made in differentmore » areas is summarized.« less