skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

Abstract

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution ofmore » proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)
  2. (Poland)
  3. Department of Immunology, Transplantology and Internal Medicine, Warsaw Medical University, Warsaw (Poland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22210387
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 430; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACID CARBONATES; CYTOPLASM; IN VITRO; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; PH VALUE; PHOSPHATES; PROTEINS; TITRATION; YEASTS

Citation Formats

Poznanski, Jaroslaw, Szczesny, Pawel, Institute of Experimental Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Ruszczynska, Katarzyna, Zielenkiewicz, Piotr, Institute of Experimental Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, and Paczek, Leszek, E-mail: leszek.paczek@wum.edu.pl. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.11.079.
Poznanski, Jaroslaw, Szczesny, Pawel, Institute of Experimental Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Ruszczynska, Katarzyna, Zielenkiewicz, Piotr, Institute of Experimental Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, & Paczek, Leszek, E-mail: leszek.paczek@wum.edu.pl. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.11.079.
Poznanski, Jaroslaw, Szczesny, Pawel, Institute of Experimental Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Ruszczynska, Katarzyna, Zielenkiewicz, Piotr, Institute of Experimental Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, and Paczek, Leszek, E-mail: leszek.paczek@wum.edu.pl. Fri . "Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.11.079.
@article{osti_22210387,
title = {Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm},
author = {Poznanski, Jaroslaw and Szczesny, Pawel and Institute of Experimental Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw and Ruszczynska, Katarzyna and Zielenkiewicz, Piotr and Institute of Experimental Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw and Paczek, Leszek, E-mail: leszek.paczek@wum.edu.pl},
abstractNote = {Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.11.079},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 430,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 11 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Fri Jan 11 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}