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Title: Surface modification of amorphous nanosilica particles suppresses nanosilica-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA damage in various mammalian cells

Abstract

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is increasing concern regarding the potential health risks of nanomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluated the effect of surface properties of nanomaterials on cellular responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the surface properties play an important in determining its safety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These data provide useful information for producing safer nanomaterials. -- Abstract: Recently, nanomaterials have been utilized in various fields. In particular, amorphous nanosilica particles are increasingly being used in a range of applications, including cosmetics, food technology, and medical diagnostics. However, there is concern that the unique characteristics of nanomaterials might induce undesirable effects. The roles played by the physical characteristics of nanomaterials in cellular responses have not yet been elucidated precisely. Here, by using nanosilica particles (nSPs) with a diameter of 70 nm whose surface was either unmodified (nSP70) or modified with amine (nSP70-N) or carboxyl groups (nSP70-C), we examined the relationship between the surface properties of nSPs and cellular responses such as cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and DNA damage. To compare the cytotoxicity of nSP70, nSP70-N, or nSP70-C, we examined in vitro cell viability after nSP treatment. Although the susceptibility of each cell line to the nSPs was different, nSP70-C and nSP70-N showed lower cytotoxicitymore » than nSP70 in all cell lines. Furthermore, the generation of ROS and induction of DNA damage in nSP70-C- and nSP70-N-treated cells were lower than those in nSP70-treated cells. These results suggest that the surface properties of nSP70 play an important role in determining its safety, and surface modification of nSP70 with amine or carboxyl groups may be useful for the development of safer nSPs. We hope that our results will contribute to the development of safer nanomaterials.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [2];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [4]
  1. Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
  2. Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan)
  3. Cancer Biology Research Center, Sanford Research/USD, 2301 E. 60th Street N, Sioux Falls, SD 57104 (United States)
  4. (Japan)
  5. Division of Foods, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1, Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22210317
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 427; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0006-291X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AMINES; CONSUMER PRODUCTS; DNA DAMAGES; ELECTROMECHANICS; FOOD; HEALTH HAZARDS; IN VITRO; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE; MICROSTRUCTURE; NANOSTRUCTURES; OXYGEN; SURFACE PROPERTIES; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Yoshida, Tokuyuki, Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp, Matsuyama, Keigo, Nakazato, Yasutaro, Tochigi, Saeko, Hirai, Toshiro, Kondoh, Sayuri, Nagano, Kazuya, Abe, Yasuhiro, Kamada, Haruhiko, Tsunoda, Shin-ichi, The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Nabeshi, Hiromi, Yoshikawa, Tomoaki, Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp, Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085, and The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871. Surface modification of amorphous nanosilica particles suppresses nanosilica-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA damage in various mammalian cells. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.09.132.
Yoshida, Tokuyuki, Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp, Matsuyama, Keigo, Nakazato, Yasutaro, Tochigi, Saeko, Hirai, Toshiro, Kondoh, Sayuri, Nagano, Kazuya, Abe, Yasuhiro, Kamada, Haruhiko, Tsunoda, Shin-ichi, The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Nabeshi, Hiromi, Yoshikawa, Tomoaki, Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp, Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085, & The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871. Surface modification of amorphous nanosilica particles suppresses nanosilica-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA damage in various mammalian cells. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.09.132.
Yoshida, Tokuyuki, Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp, Matsuyama, Keigo, Nakazato, Yasutaro, Tochigi, Saeko, Hirai, Toshiro, Kondoh, Sayuri, Nagano, Kazuya, Abe, Yasuhiro, Kamada, Haruhiko, Tsunoda, Shin-ichi, The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Nabeshi, Hiromi, Yoshikawa, Tomoaki, Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp, Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085, and The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871. Fri . "Surface modification of amorphous nanosilica particles suppresses nanosilica-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA damage in various mammalian cells". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.09.132.
@article{osti_22210317,
title = {Surface modification of amorphous nanosilica particles suppresses nanosilica-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA damage in various mammalian cells},
author = {Yoshida, Tokuyuki and Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp and Matsuyama, Keigo and Nakazato, Yasutaro and Tochigi, Saeko and Hirai, Toshiro and Kondoh, Sayuri and Nagano, Kazuya and Abe, Yasuhiro and Kamada, Haruhiko and Tsunoda, Shin-ichi and The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 and Nabeshi, Hiromi and Yoshikawa, Tomoaki and Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp and Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 and The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871},
abstractNote = {Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is increasing concern regarding the potential health risks of nanomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluated the effect of surface properties of nanomaterials on cellular responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the surface properties play an important in determining its safety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These data provide useful information for producing safer nanomaterials. -- Abstract: Recently, nanomaterials have been utilized in various fields. In particular, amorphous nanosilica particles are increasingly being used in a range of applications, including cosmetics, food technology, and medical diagnostics. However, there is concern that the unique characteristics of nanomaterials might induce undesirable effects. The roles played by the physical characteristics of nanomaterials in cellular responses have not yet been elucidated precisely. Here, by using nanosilica particles (nSPs) with a diameter of 70 nm whose surface was either unmodified (nSP70) or modified with amine (nSP70-N) or carboxyl groups (nSP70-C), we examined the relationship between the surface properties of nSPs and cellular responses such as cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and DNA damage. To compare the cytotoxicity of nSP70, nSP70-N, or nSP70-C, we examined in vitro cell viability after nSP treatment. Although the susceptibility of each cell line to the nSPs was different, nSP70-C and nSP70-N showed lower cytotoxicity than nSP70 in all cell lines. Furthermore, the generation of ROS and induction of DNA damage in nSP70-C- and nSP70-N-treated cells were lower than those in nSP70-treated cells. These results suggest that the surface properties of nSP70 play an important role in determining its safety, and surface modification of nSP70 with amine or carboxyl groups may be useful for the development of safer nSPs. We hope that our results will contribute to the development of safer nanomaterials.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.09.132},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
issn = {0006-291X},
number = 4,
volume = 427,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}