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Title: Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

Abstract

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells andmore » induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)
  2. Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan)
  3. Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)
  4. Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22207838
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 421; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0006-291X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; APOPTOSIS; CELL PROLIFERATION; FIBROBLASTS; IN VIVO; INJECTION; NEOPLASMS; PANCREAS; PHENOTYPE; SIMIAN VIRUS; STEM CELLS; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Hamada, Shin, Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp, Takikawa, Tetsuya, Suzuki, Noriaki, Kikuta, Kazuhiro, Hirota, Morihisa, Hamada, Hirofumi, Kobune, Masayoshi, Satoh, Kennichi, and Shimosegawa, Tooru. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.04.014.
Hamada, Shin, Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp, Takikawa, Tetsuya, Suzuki, Noriaki, Kikuta, Kazuhiro, Hirota, Morihisa, Hamada, Hirofumi, Kobune, Masayoshi, Satoh, Kennichi, & Shimosegawa, Tooru. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.04.014.
Hamada, Shin, Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp, Takikawa, Tetsuya, Suzuki, Noriaki, Kikuta, Kazuhiro, Hirota, Morihisa, Hamada, Hirofumi, Kobune, Masayoshi, Satoh, Kennichi, and Shimosegawa, Tooru. Fri . "Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.04.014.
@article{osti_22207838,
title = {Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells},
author = {Hamada, Shin and Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp and Takikawa, Tetsuya and Suzuki, Noriaki and Kikuta, Kazuhiro and Hirota, Morihisa and Hamada, Hirofumi and Kobune, Masayoshi and Satoh, Kennichi and Shimosegawa, Tooru},
abstractNote = {Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2012.04.014},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
issn = {0006-291X},
number = 2,
volume = 421,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {5}
}