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Title: Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)
  2. Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22202401
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 393; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BONE MARROW; COLONY FORMING UNITS; DRUGS; EDTA; FIBROBLASTS; GLUCOSE; GROWTH FACTORS; KARYOTYPE; MORPHOLOGY; PHOSPHATES; RECEPTORS; STEM CELLS; THERAPY; TRYPSIN

Citation Formats

Tomar, Geetanjali B., Srivastava, Rupesh K., Gupta, Navita, Barhanpurkar, Amruta P., Pote, Satish T., Jhaveri, Hiral M., Mishra, Gyan C., and Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2010.01.126.
Tomar, Geetanjali B., Srivastava, Rupesh K., Gupta, Navita, Barhanpurkar, Amruta P., Pote, Satish T., Jhaveri, Hiral M., Mishra, Gyan C., & Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2010.01.126.
Tomar, Geetanjali B., Srivastava, Rupesh K., Gupta, Navita, Barhanpurkar, Amruta P., Pote, Satish T., Jhaveri, Hiral M., Mishra, Gyan C., and Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in. Fri . "Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2010.01.126.
@article{osti_22202401,
title = {Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine},
author = {Tomar, Geetanjali B. and Srivastava, Rupesh K. and Gupta, Navita and Barhanpurkar, Amruta P. and Pote, Satish T. and Jhaveri, Hiral M. and Mishra, Gyan C. and Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in},
abstractNote = {Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2010.01.126},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 3,
volume = 393,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 12 00:00:00 EST 2010},
month = {Fri Mar 12 00:00:00 EST 2010}
}
  • Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacterial pathogens, which not only affect connective tissue attachments but also cause alveolar bone loss. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of Human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs) on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs) under lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory conditions. Proliferation levels were measured by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU). Osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization were investigated using chromogenic alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) activity substrate assays, Alizarin red S staining, and RT-PCR analysis of HBMSCs osteogenic marker expression. Oxidative stress induced by LPS was investigated by assayingmore » reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Here, we demonstrated that HAMSCs increased the proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, and SOD activity of LPS-induced HBMSCs, and down-regulated the ROS level. Moreover, our results suggested that the activation of p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway is essential for reversing the LPS-induced bone-destructive processes. SB203580, a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK signaling, significantly suppressed the anti-inflammatory effects in HAMSCs. In conclusion, HAMSCs show a strong potential in treating inflammation-induced bone loss by influencing p38 MAPK signaling. - Highlights: • LPS inhibites osteogenic differentiation in HBMSCs via suppression of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. • HAMSCs promote LPS-induced HBMSCs osteogenic differentiation through p38 MAPK signaling pathway. • HAMSCs reverse LPS-induced oxidative stress in LPS-induced HBMSCs through p38 MAPK signaling pathway.« less
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