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Title: SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2

Abstract

Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an interferon-induced transcriptional activator that suppresses tumors by impeding cell proliferation. Recently, we demonstrated that the level of SUMOylated IRF-1 is elevated in tumor cells, and that SUMOylation of IRF-1 attenuates its tumor-suppressive function. Here we report that SUMOylated IRF-1 mimics IRF-2, an antagonistic repressor, and shows oncogenic potential. To demonstrate the role of SUMOylated IRF-1 in tumorigenesis, we used SUMO-IRF-1 recombinant protein. Stable expression of SUMO-IRF-1 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in focus formation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Inoculation of SUMO-IRF-1-transfected cells into athymic nude mice resulted in tumor formation and infiltration of adipose tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that SUMO-IRF-1 transforms NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that SUMOylated IRF-1 may act as an oncogenic protein in tumor cells.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4]; ;  [5];  [6];  [7];  [1]
  1. Yonsei University, Division of Biological Science and Technology, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. (Korea, Republic of)
  3. Clinical Trial Center for Functional Foods, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of)
  4. Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)
  5. Proteome Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)
  6. School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)
  7. Molecular Therapy Research Center, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22199994
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 391; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADIPOSE TISSUE; AGAR; CELL PROLIFERATION; DOSES; INOCULATION; INTERFERON; MICE; NEOPLASMS; TUMOR CELLS

Citation Formats

Park, Sun-Mi, School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Chae, Myounghee, Kim, Bo-Kyoung, Seo, Taegun, Jang, Ik-Soon, Choi, Jong-Soon, Kim, Il-Chul, Lee, Je-Ho, and Park, Junsoo, E-mail: junsoo@yonsei.ac.kr. SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.11.166.
Park, Sun-Mi, School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Chae, Myounghee, Kim, Bo-Kyoung, Seo, Taegun, Jang, Ik-Soon, Choi, Jong-Soon, Kim, Il-Chul, Lee, Je-Ho, & Park, Junsoo, E-mail: junsoo@yonsei.ac.kr. SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.11.166.
Park, Sun-Mi, School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Chae, Myounghee, Kim, Bo-Kyoung, Seo, Taegun, Jang, Ik-Soon, Choi, Jong-Soon, Kim, Il-Chul, Lee, Je-Ho, and Park, Junsoo, E-mail: junsoo@yonsei.ac.kr. 2010. "SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.11.166.
@article{osti_22199994,
title = {SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2},
author = {Park, Sun-Mi and School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 and Chae, Myounghee and Kim, Bo-Kyoung and Seo, Taegun and Jang, Ik-Soon and Choi, Jong-Soon and Kim, Il-Chul and Lee, Je-Ho and Park, Junsoo, E-mail: junsoo@yonsei.ac.kr},
abstractNote = {Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an interferon-induced transcriptional activator that suppresses tumors by impeding cell proliferation. Recently, we demonstrated that the level of SUMOylated IRF-1 is elevated in tumor cells, and that SUMOylation of IRF-1 attenuates its tumor-suppressive function. Here we report that SUMOylated IRF-1 mimics IRF-2, an antagonistic repressor, and shows oncogenic potential. To demonstrate the role of SUMOylated IRF-1 in tumorigenesis, we used SUMO-IRF-1 recombinant protein. Stable expression of SUMO-IRF-1 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in focus formation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Inoculation of SUMO-IRF-1-transfected cells into athymic nude mice resulted in tumor formation and infiltration of adipose tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that SUMO-IRF-1 transforms NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that SUMOylated IRF-1 may act as an oncogenic protein in tumor cells.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.11.166},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 391,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 1
}
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