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Title: Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-planned partial salvage permanent prostate implant (psPPI) among patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence after initial PPI without evidence of distant disease. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2009, 15 patients underwent MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) planning for salvage brachytherapy (psPPI, I-125 [n=14; 144 Gy]; Pd-103 [n=1; 125 Gy]) without hormone therapy. Full dose was prescribed to areas of recurrence and underdosage, without entire prostate implantation. Limiting urethral and rectal toxicity was prioritized. Follow-up was from salvage date to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration failure (Phoenix criteria = nadir + 2.0; ASTRO = 3 consecutive rises), recurrence, distant metastases, or last follow-up PSA level. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as no PSA failure or biopsy-proven recurrence without all-cause mortality. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: At salvage, median age was 68 years, and PSA concentration was 3.5 ng/mL (range, 0.9-5.6 ng/mL). Abnormal MRI/MRS findings were evident in 40% of patients. Biopsy-proven recurrences consisted of a single focus (80%) or 2 foci (20%). At recurrence, Gleason score was 6 (67%) or {>=}7 (27%). Median interval between initial and salvage implantation was 69 months (range, 28-132 months). psPPI planning characteristicsmore » limited doses to the rectum (mean V100 = 0.5% [0.07 cc]) and urethra (V100 = 12% [0.3 cc]). At median follow-up (23.3 months; range, 8-88 months), treatment failure (n=2) resulted only in localized recurrence; both patients underwent second psPPI with follow-up PSA tests at 12 and 26 months, resulting in 0.6 and 0.7 ng/mL, respectively. American Society for Radiation Oncology PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 86.7%, 78.4%, and 62.7%, respectively, with 5 patients for whom treatment failed (n=3 with negative transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results). Phoenix PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 100%, 100%, and 71.4%. 73%, respectively; achieved PSA nadir of <0.5 ng/mL; and 47% of patients had a nadir of <0.1 ng/mL. Treatment-related toxicity was minimal, with no operative interventions, fistulas, or other grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Thirteen percent had grade 1 GI and 33% had grade 2 GU toxicities. Postsalvage, 20% of patients had no erectile dysfunction, 67% of patients had medication-responsive erectile dysfunction, and 13% of patients had erectile dysfunction refractory to medication. Conclusions: Focal psPPI with MR-planning in highly selected patients is feasible with short-term control comparable to conventional salvage, with less toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm its impact on quality of life and treatment.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]; ;  [1];  [4];  [1];  [5];  [6];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Dijon University, Dijon (France)
  4. Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)
  5. Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)
  6. Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22149760
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANTIGENS; BIOPSY; BRACHYTHERAPY; FAILURES; HORMONES; IMPLANTS; IODINE 125; METASTASES; MORTALITY; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PALLADIUM 103; PATIENTS; PLANNING; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RECTUM; SPECTROSCOPY; STANDARD OF LIVING; TOXICITY; URINARY TRACT

Citation Formats

Hsu, Charles C., E-mail: hsucc@radonc.ucsf.edu, Hsu, Howard, Pickett, Barby, Crehange, Gilles, Hsu, I-Chow Joe, Dea, Ryan, Weinberg, Vivian, Gottschalk, Alexander R., Kurhanewicz, John, Shinohara, Katsuto, and Roach, Mack. Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.04.028.
Hsu, Charles C., E-mail: hsucc@radonc.ucsf.edu, Hsu, Howard, Pickett, Barby, Crehange, Gilles, Hsu, I-Chow Joe, Dea, Ryan, Weinberg, Vivian, Gottschalk, Alexander R., Kurhanewicz, John, Shinohara, Katsuto, & Roach, Mack. Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.04.028.
Hsu, Charles C., E-mail: hsucc@radonc.ucsf.edu, Hsu, Howard, Pickett, Barby, Crehange, Gilles, Hsu, I-Chow Joe, Dea, Ryan, Weinberg, Vivian, Gottschalk, Alexander R., Kurhanewicz, John, Shinohara, Katsuto, and Roach, Mack. 2013. "Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.04.028.
@article{osti_22149760,
title = {Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer},
author = {Hsu, Charles C., E-mail: hsucc@radonc.ucsf.edu and Hsu, Howard and Pickett, Barby and Crehange, Gilles and Hsu, I-Chow Joe and Dea, Ryan and Weinberg, Vivian and Gottschalk, Alexander R. and Kurhanewicz, John and Shinohara, Katsuto and Roach, Mack},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-planned partial salvage permanent prostate implant (psPPI) among patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence after initial PPI without evidence of distant disease. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2009, 15 patients underwent MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) planning for salvage brachytherapy (psPPI, I-125 [n=14; 144 Gy]; Pd-103 [n=1; 125 Gy]) without hormone therapy. Full dose was prescribed to areas of recurrence and underdosage, without entire prostate implantation. Limiting urethral and rectal toxicity was prioritized. Follow-up was from salvage date to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration failure (Phoenix criteria = nadir + 2.0; ASTRO = 3 consecutive rises), recurrence, distant metastases, or last follow-up PSA level. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as no PSA failure or biopsy-proven recurrence without all-cause mortality. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: At salvage, median age was 68 years, and PSA concentration was 3.5 ng/mL (range, 0.9-5.6 ng/mL). Abnormal MRI/MRS findings were evident in 40% of patients. Biopsy-proven recurrences consisted of a single focus (80%) or 2 foci (20%). At recurrence, Gleason score was 6 (67%) or {>=}7 (27%). Median interval between initial and salvage implantation was 69 months (range, 28-132 months). psPPI planning characteristics limited doses to the rectum (mean V100 = 0.5% [0.07 cc]) and urethra (V100 = 12% [0.3 cc]). At median follow-up (23.3 months; range, 8-88 months), treatment failure (n=2) resulted only in localized recurrence; both patients underwent second psPPI with follow-up PSA tests at 12 and 26 months, resulting in 0.6 and 0.7 ng/mL, respectively. American Society for Radiation Oncology PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 86.7%, 78.4%, and 62.7%, respectively, with 5 patients for whom treatment failed (n=3 with negative transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results). Phoenix PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 100%, 100%, and 71.4%. 73%, respectively; achieved PSA nadir of <0.5 ng/mL; and 47% of patients had a nadir of <0.1 ng/mL. Treatment-related toxicity was minimal, with no operative interventions, fistulas, or other grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Thirteen percent had grade 1 GI and 33% had grade 2 GU toxicities. Postsalvage, 20% of patients had no erectile dysfunction, 67% of patients had medication-responsive erectile dysfunction, and 13% of patients had erectile dysfunction refractory to medication. Conclusions: Focal psPPI with MR-planning in highly selected patients is feasible with short-term control comparable to conventional salvage, with less toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm its impact on quality of life and treatment.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.04.028},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 2
}
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 21 consecutively accrued patients undergoing salvage HDR brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT between November 1998 and December 2005. After pathologic confirmation of locally recurrent disease, all patients were treated with 36 Gy in six fractions using two transrectal ultrasound-guided HDR prostate implants, separated by 1 week. Eleven patients received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy immediately presalvage, whereas none received adjuvant hormonal therapy postsalvage. Median follow-upmore » time from recurrence was 18.7 months (range, 6-84 months). Determination of subsequent biochemical failure after brachytherapy was based on the definition by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Results: Based on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3), 18 patients reported Grade 1 to 2 genitourinary symptoms by 3 months postsalvage. Three patients developed Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. Maximum observed gastrointestinal toxicity was Grade 2; all cases spontaneously resolved. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of biochemical control after recurrence was 89%. Thirteen patients have achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.1 ng/ml, but at the time of writing this endpoint has not yet been reached for all patients. All patients are alive; however 2 have experienced biochemical failure, both with PSA nadirs {>=}1, and have subsequently been found to have distant metastases. Conclusions: Salvage HDR prostate brachytherapy appears to be feasible and effective.« less
  • Purpose: We recently published a scoring algorithm to predict biochemical recurrence (BCR) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) for prostate cancer. Currently, this algorithm is based on clinicopathologic features and does not incorporate information from tumor-based biomarkers. Herein, we evaluate the ability of Ki-67 staining in primary prostate cancer to independently aid in the prediction of BCR among men undergoing SRT. Methods and Materials: We identified 147 patients who were treated with SRT between July 1987 and July 2003 at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN; Jacksonville, FL; Scottsdale, AZ). Staining levels of Ki-67 in primary tumor samples were detected by use ofmore » a monoclonal antibody and quantified by use of a computer-assisted method. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association of Ki-67 staining and BCR in single-variable models and after multivariable adjustment. Results: The risk of BCR for men with tumors in the highest tertile of Ki-67 staining is approximately two times that for men with tumors in the lower two tertiles (relative risk, 2.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.32; p = 0.005) after adjustment for the features in our original scoring algorithm. Further adjustment for additional covariates did not attenuate this association. Evidence from concordance index values supports that Ki-67 staining adds to the predictive ability of our existing scoring algorithm. Conclusions: Our data suggest that higher levels of Ki-67 staining are associated with increased risk of BCR after SRT, independent of existing clinicopathologic covariates. Future studies involving larger numbers of patients are required to validate these results and also explore possible means of combining this biomarker with existing prognostic tools.« less
  • Purpose: The ability to predict which men will experience biochemical recurrence (BCR) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) for recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) remains less than optimal. Related to this, novel targets for adjuvant therapies are also lacking. Here, we evaluate the association of B7-H3 expression in primary PCa tumors and BCR after SRT. Methods and Materials: We identified 148 patients who received SRT between July 1987 and July 2003. Expression of B7-H3 in primary PCa tumors was detected using a monoclonal antibody. The staining levels were quantified via visual assessment and categorized as weak, moderate, or marked. Relative risks (RRs)more » and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between B7-H3 staining and BCR. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years (minimum, 0.6; maximum, 14.7), 78 patients (53%) experienced BCR. In single-variable analysis, there was evidence of an increased risk of BCR for patients with moderate (RR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.24-4.09, p = 0.008) and marked (RR, 4.40, 95% CI, 2.29-8.43, p < 0.001) B7-H3 staining compared with weak staining. This evidence remained, albeit weaker, after adjustment for additional clinicopathologic covariates (RR, 1.82, p = 0.068 [moderate vs. weak]; RR, 2.87, p = 0.003 [marked vs. weak]). Conclusion: This is the first report that higher tumor B7-H3 staining in primary PCa tumors is associated with increased risk of BCR after SRT. Future studies involving larger numbers of patients are required to validate these results and also to explore possible means of targeting B7-H3 in an adjuvant setting.« less
  • Purpose: Salvage treatment of the entire prostate for local recurrent cancer after primary radiotherapy is associated with high toxicity rates. Our goal was to show that, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the visualization of a recurrence, focal salvage treatment can be performed, with, potentially, a reduction in toxicity. Methods and Materials: We performed MRI, including a DCE sequence, in 7 patients with biopsy-proven locally recurrent prostate cancer. The specific regions of interest suspect for containing tumor were delineated using DCE and T{sub 2}-weighted MRI scans. Subsequently, focal salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy plans were created to illustrate the principlemore » of focal salvage. Total salvage treatment plans were also created for comparison. Results: The transfer constant (K{sup trans}) values from the DCE were 0.33-0.67 min{sup -1} for areas suspect for tumor and 0.07-0.25 min{sup -1} for normal tissue. In 4 cases, a focal salvage plan could be generated; 93-100% of the gross tumor volume was covered with the prescribed dose, with relative sparing of the bladder, rectum, and urethra. In the total salvage plans, 24-53% of the gross tumor volume was covered, and the organs at risk received high doses. In 3 cases, a focal salvage plan could not be created because of multifocal tumor, seminal vesicle extension, or capsular extension. Conclusion: Focal salvage treatment plans can be created in patients with local recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. DCE-MRI supports the localization of the target area. This could lead to less toxicity in patients with local recurrent prostate cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To report a multi-institutional outcomes study on permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) to 9 years that includes postimplant dosimetry, to develop a postimplant nomogram predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence. Methods and Materials: Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 5,931 patients who underwent PPB for clinically localized prostate cancer from six centers. The model was validated against the dataset using bootstrapping. Disease progression was determined using the Phoenix definition. The biological equivalent dose was calculated from the minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) and external-beam radiotherapy dose using an alpha/beta of 2. Results:more » The 9-year biochemical freedom from recurrence probability for the modeling set was 77% (95% confidence interval, 73-81%). In the model, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason sum, isotope, external beam radiation, year of treatment, and D90 were associated with recurrence (each p < 0.05), whereas clinical stage was not. The concordance index of the model was 0.710. Conclusion: A predictive model for a postimplant nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence at 9-years after PPB has been developed and validated from a large multi-institutional database. This study also demonstrates the significance of implant dosimetry for predicting outcome. Unique to predictive models, these nomograms may be used a priori to calculate a D90 that likely achieves a desired outcome with further validation. Thus, a personalized dose prescription can potentially be calculated for each patient.« less