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Title: STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

Abstract

The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15more » Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)
  2. Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)
  3. Department of Physics, Cambridge University, Cambridge (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22122880
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (New York, N.Y. Online); Journal Volume: 146; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BRIGHTNESS; COLOR; CORRELATIONS; EMISSION; EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; HYPOTHESIS; LUMINOSITY; MASS; STARS; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Schombert, James, McGaugh, Stacy, and Maciel, Tamela, E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: tm419@cam.ac.uk. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/146/2/41.
Schombert, James, McGaugh, Stacy, & Maciel, Tamela, E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: tm419@cam.ac.uk. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/146/2/41.
Schombert, James, McGaugh, Stacy, and Maciel, Tamela, E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: tm419@cam.ac.uk. 2013. "STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/146/2/41.
@article{osti_22122880,
title = {STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS},
author = {Schombert, James and McGaugh, Stacy and Maciel, Tamela, E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: tm419@cam.ac.uk},
abstractNote = {The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-6256/146/2/41},
journal = {Astronomical Journal (New York, N.Y. Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 146,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 8
}
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