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Title: Compressibility and strength of nanocrystalline tungsten boride under compression to 60 GPa

Abstract

The compression behavior and stress state of nanocrystalline tungsten boride (WB) were investigated using radial x-ray diffraction (RXRD) in a diamond-anvil cell under non-hydrostatic compression up to 60.4 GPa. The compression properties and stress state are analyzed using lattice strain theory. Experiments were conducted at beamline X17C of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The radial x-ray diffraction data yield a bulk modulus that is qualitatively consistent with density functional theory calculations and demonstrate that WB is a highly incompressible material. A maximum differential stress, t, of about 14 GPa can be supported by nanocrystalline WB at the highest pressure. This corresponds to about 5% of the shear modulus, G, which is smaller than the values of t/G ({approx}8%-10%) observed for BC{sub 2}N, B{sub 6}O, TiB{sub 2}, and {gamma}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} at high pressures. Thus, while WB is highly incompressible, its strength is relatively low at high pressures compared to other hard ceramics.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3]; ; ; ;  [1];  [4]
  1. Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)
  2. (United States)
  3. Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)
  4. Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22089247
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: (c) 2012 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CERAMICS; COMPRESSIBILITY; CRYSTALS; DENSITY FUNCTIONAL METHOD; NANOSTRUCTURES; PRESSURE RANGE GIGA PA; SILICON NITRIDES; STRAINS; STRESSES; TITANIUM BORIDES; TUNGSTEN BORIDES; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Dong Haini, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, Dorfman, Susannah M., Duffy, Thomas S., Chen Ying, Wang Haikuo, Wang Jianghua, He Duanwei, and Qin Jiaqian. Compressibility and strength of nanocrystalline tungsten boride under compression to 60 GPa. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4728208.
Dong Haini, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, Dorfman, Susannah M., Duffy, Thomas S., Chen Ying, Wang Haikuo, Wang Jianghua, He Duanwei, & Qin Jiaqian. Compressibility and strength of nanocrystalline tungsten boride under compression to 60 GPa. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4728208.
Dong Haini, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, Dorfman, Susannah M., Duffy, Thomas S., Chen Ying, Wang Haikuo, Wang Jianghua, He Duanwei, and Qin Jiaqian. Fri . "Compressibility and strength of nanocrystalline tungsten boride under compression to 60 GPa". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4728208.
@article{osti_22089247,
title = {Compressibility and strength of nanocrystalline tungsten boride under compression to 60 GPa},
author = {Dong Haini and Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 and Dorfman, Susannah M. and Duffy, Thomas S. and Chen Ying and Wang Haikuo and Wang Jianghua and He Duanwei and Qin Jiaqian},
abstractNote = {The compression behavior and stress state of nanocrystalline tungsten boride (WB) were investigated using radial x-ray diffraction (RXRD) in a diamond-anvil cell under non-hydrostatic compression up to 60.4 GPa. The compression properties and stress state are analyzed using lattice strain theory. Experiments were conducted at beamline X17C of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The radial x-ray diffraction data yield a bulk modulus that is qualitatively consistent with density functional theory calculations and demonstrate that WB is a highly incompressible material. A maximum differential stress, t, of about 14 GPa can be supported by nanocrystalline WB at the highest pressure. This corresponds to about 5% of the shear modulus, G, which is smaller than the values of t/G ({approx}8%-10%) observed for BC{sub 2}N, B{sub 6}O, TiB{sub 2}, and {gamma}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} at high pressures. Thus, while WB is highly incompressible, its strength is relatively low at high pressures compared to other hard ceramics.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4728208},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = 12,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {6}
}