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Title: F-18-FDG-PET Confined Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced NSCLC With Concomitant Chemotherapy: Results of the PET-PLAN Pilot Trial

Abstract

Purpose: The integration of fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the process of radiotherapy (RT) planning of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may improve diagnostic accuracy and minimize interobserver variability compared with target volume definition solely based on computed tomography. Furthermore, irradiating only FDG-PET-positive findings and omitting elective nodal regions may allow dose escalation by treating smaller volumes. The aim of this prospective pilot trial was to evaluate the therapeutic safety of FDG-PET-based RT treatment planning with an autocontour-derived delineation of the primary tumor. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had Stages II-III inoperable NSCLC, and simultaneous, platinum-based radiochemotherapy was indicated. FDG-PET and computed tomography acquisitions in RT treatment planning position were coregistered. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the FDG-PET-defined primary tumor, which was autodelineated with a source-to-background algorithm, plus FDG-PET-positive lymph node stations. Limited by dose restrictions for normal tissues, prescribed total doses were in the range of 66.6 to 73.8 Gy. The primary endpoint was the rate of out-of-field isolated nodal recurrences (INR). Results: As per intent to treat, 32 patients received radiochemotherapy. In 15 of these patients, dose escalation above 66.6 Gy was achieved. No Grade 4 toxicities occurred. After a median follow-up time of 27.2more » months, the estimated median survival time was 19.3 months. During the observation period, one INR was observed in 23 evaluable patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET-confined target volume definition in radiochemotherapy of NSCLC, based on a contrast-oriented source-to-background algorithm, was associated with a low risk of INR. It might provide improved tumor control because of dose escalation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [2];  [4];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany)
  2. Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany)
  3. Department of Internal Medicine V, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany)
  4. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22054378
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 81; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; ALGORITHMS; CHEMOTHERAPY; FLUORINE 18; FLUORODEOXYGLUCOSE; HAZARDS; LUNGS; LYMPH NODES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; PLATINUM; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURVIVAL TIME; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Fleckenstein, Jochen, Hellwig, Dirk, Kremp, Stephanie, Grgic, Aleksandar, Groeschel, Andreas, Kirsch, Carl-Martin, Nestle, Ursula, Clinic for Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Freiburg, and Ruebe, Christian, E-mail: christian.ruebe@uks.eu. F-18-FDG-PET Confined Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced NSCLC With Concomitant Chemotherapy: Results of the PET-PLAN Pilot Trial. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.01.020.
Fleckenstein, Jochen, Hellwig, Dirk, Kremp, Stephanie, Grgic, Aleksandar, Groeschel, Andreas, Kirsch, Carl-Martin, Nestle, Ursula, Clinic for Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Freiburg, & Ruebe, Christian, E-mail: christian.ruebe@uks.eu. F-18-FDG-PET Confined Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced NSCLC With Concomitant Chemotherapy: Results of the PET-PLAN Pilot Trial. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.01.020.
Fleckenstein, Jochen, Hellwig, Dirk, Kremp, Stephanie, Grgic, Aleksandar, Groeschel, Andreas, Kirsch, Carl-Martin, Nestle, Ursula, Clinic for Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Freiburg, and Ruebe, Christian, E-mail: christian.ruebe@uks.eu. 2011. "F-18-FDG-PET Confined Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced NSCLC With Concomitant Chemotherapy: Results of the PET-PLAN Pilot Trial". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.01.020.
@article{osti_22054378,
title = {F-18-FDG-PET Confined Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced NSCLC With Concomitant Chemotherapy: Results of the PET-PLAN Pilot Trial},
author = {Fleckenstein, Jochen and Hellwig, Dirk and Kremp, Stephanie and Grgic, Aleksandar and Groeschel, Andreas and Kirsch, Carl-Martin and Nestle, Ursula and Clinic for Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Freiburg and Ruebe, Christian, E-mail: christian.ruebe@uks.eu},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The integration of fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the process of radiotherapy (RT) planning of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may improve diagnostic accuracy and minimize interobserver variability compared with target volume definition solely based on computed tomography. Furthermore, irradiating only FDG-PET-positive findings and omitting elective nodal regions may allow dose escalation by treating smaller volumes. The aim of this prospective pilot trial was to evaluate the therapeutic safety of FDG-PET-based RT treatment planning with an autocontour-derived delineation of the primary tumor. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had Stages II-III inoperable NSCLC, and simultaneous, platinum-based radiochemotherapy was indicated. FDG-PET and computed tomography acquisitions in RT treatment planning position were coregistered. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the FDG-PET-defined primary tumor, which was autodelineated with a source-to-background algorithm, plus FDG-PET-positive lymph node stations. Limited by dose restrictions for normal tissues, prescribed total doses were in the range of 66.6 to 73.8 Gy. The primary endpoint was the rate of out-of-field isolated nodal recurrences (INR). Results: As per intent to treat, 32 patients received radiochemotherapy. In 15 of these patients, dose escalation above 66.6 Gy was achieved. No Grade 4 toxicities occurred. After a median follow-up time of 27.2 months, the estimated median survival time was 19.3 months. During the observation period, one INR was observed in 23 evaluable patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET-confined target volume definition in radiochemotherapy of NSCLC, based on a contrast-oriented source-to-background algorithm, was associated with a low risk of INR. It might provide improved tumor control because of dose escalation.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.01.020},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month =
}
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare toxicity/efficacy of conventional radiotherapy using delayed accelerated concomitant boost radiotherapy (CBRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy (CT) for locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and June 2004, a total of 293 consecutive patients were treated at our institution for cancer of the oropharynx. Of these, 112 had Stage III/IV disease and squamous cell histology. In all, 41 were treated with IMRT/CT and 71 were treated with CBRT/CT, both to a median dose of 70 Gy. Most common CT was a planned twomore » cycles given every 3 to 4 weeks of cisplatin, 100 mg/m{sup 2} i.v., but an additional cycle was given to IMRT patients when possible. Both groups were well-matched for all prognostic factors. Results: Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 3-93 months) for the CBRT patients and 31 months (range, 20-64 months) for the IMRT group. Three-year actuarial local-progression-free, regional-progression-free, locoregional progression-free, distant-metastases-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 85% vs. 95% (p = 0.17), 95% vs. 94% (p = 0.90), 82% vs. 92% (p = 0.18), 85% vs. 86% (p = 0.78), 76% vs. 82% (p = 0.57), and 81% vs. 91% (p = 0.10) for CBRT and IMRT patients, respectively. Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity in the CBRT group vs. none undergoing IMRT. At 2 years, 4% IMRT patients vs. 21% CBRT patients were dependent on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (p = 0.02). Among those who had {>=}20 months follow-up, there was a significant difference in Grade {>=}2 xerostomia as defined by the criteria of Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group, 67% vs. 12% (p = 0.02), in the CBRT vs. IMRT arm. Conclusion: In the setting of CT for locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma, IMRT results in lower toxicity and similar treatment outcomes when compared with CBRT.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the long-term outcome of treatment with concomitant cisplatin and hyperfractionated radiotherapy versus treatment with hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From July 1994 to July 2000, a total of 224 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were randomized to receive either hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone (median total dose, 74.4 Gy; 1.2 Gy twice daily; 5 days per week) or the same radiotherapy combined with two cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 consecutive days during weeks 1 and 5). The primary endpoint was themore » time to any treatment failure; secondary endpoints were locoregional failure, metastatic failure, overall survival, and late toxicity assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Median follow-up was 9.5 years (range, 0.1-15.4 years). Median time to any treatment failure was not significantly different between treatment arms (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2 [95% confidence interval {l_brace}CI{r_brace}, 0.9-1.7; p = 0.17]). Rates of locoregional failure-free survival (HR, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.1-2.1; p = 0.02]), distant metastasis-free survival (HR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.1-2.5; p = 0.02]), and cancer-specific survival (HR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.0-2.5; p = 0.03]) were significantly improved in the combined-treatment arm, with no difference in major late toxicity between treatment arms. However, overall survival was not significantly different (HR, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.9-1.8; p = 0.11]). Conclusions: After long-term follow-up, combined-treatment with cisplatin and hyperfractionated radiotherapy maintained improved rates of locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival compared to that of hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone, with no difference in major late toxicity.« less
  • Purpose: To compare concomitant and sequential adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens in node-positive, operable breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized, French, multicenter, phase III trial enrolling 638 eligible women with prior breast surgery and positive axillary dissection. Patients in Arm A received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 12 mg/m{sup 2} mitoxantrone, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with concomitant radiotherapy (50 Gy {+-} 10-20-Gy boost). Patients in Arm B received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 60 mg/m{sup 2} epirubicin, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with subsequent radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was administered on Day 1 every 21 days for 4 cycles. Results: Medianmore » treatment durations were 64 and 126 days (Arms A and B, respectively), with no significant difference in overall or disease-free survival. Five-year locoregional relapse-free survival favored patients with conservative surgery (two thirds of the population), with less local and/or regional recurrence in Arm A than in Arm B (3% vs. 9%; p 0.01). Multivariate analysis in this subgroup showed a 2.8-fold increased risk of locoregional recurrence with sequential chemoradiotherapy, independent of other prognostic factors (p = 0.027). Febrile neutropenia and Grade 3-4 leukopenia were significantly more frequent in Arm A. Subclinical left ventricular ejection fraction events at 1 year were more frequent with concomitant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Concomitant radiotherapy with adjuvant fluorouracil, mitoxantrone, and cyclophosphamide has significantly better locoregional control in node-positive breast cancer after conservative surgery and 50% shorter treatment, albeit with slightly more acute toxicity. With mitoxantrone no longer available for adjuvant breast cancer treatment, alternative concomitant chemoradiotherapy studies are needed.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of ifosfamide and cisplatin administered concomitantly with low-dose-rate brachytherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (LASCC). Methods and materials: Forty-four patients with biopsy-proven LASCC were enrolled. FIGO Stages IB2 bulky to IVA were entered into this study. Patients were assigned to receive external radiotherapy (50 Gy in 25 fractions); then ifosfamide 2 g/m{sup 2} plus cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} was applied during two low-dose-rate brachytherapy applications, and 4 cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with the same drug combination were given after completion of radiotherapy. The plannedmore » dose to point A was 85 Gy. Results: All patients received both courses of concomitant chemobrachytherapy and at least 1 cycle of consolidation chemotherapy. The average duration of radiation was 45.1 days. The clinical complete response rate was 100%. Grade 3 and 4 leukopenia occurred in 25% and 11% of the cycles, respectively. After a median follow-up of 34 months (range, 20-54 months), the recurrence-free and the overall survival rates were 84% and 91%, respectively. Major delayed local complications occurred in 7 cases (16%). Conclusions: These results indicate that concomitant chemobrachyradiotherapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin is a feasible combination for patients with LASCC of the cervix uteri. A randomized trial is planned.« less
  • Purpose: Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that both CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy) and induction chemotherapy offer a survival advantage over conventional radical radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell-lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicenter randomized controlled trial (INCH) was set up to assess the value of giving induction chemotherapy before CHART. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed, inoperable, Stage I-III NSCLC were randomized to induction chemotherapy (ICT) (three cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by CHART) or CHART alone. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized (23 in each treatment arm) from 9 UK centers. As a result ofmore » poor accrual, the trial was closed in December 2007. Twenty-eight patients were male, 28 had squamous cell histology, 34 were Stage IIIA or IIIB, and all baseline characteristics were well balanced between the two treatment arms. Seventeen (74%) of the 23 ICT patients completed the three cycles of chemotherapy. All 42 (22 CHART + 20 ICT) patients who received CHART completed the prescribed treatment. Median survival was 17 months in the CHART arm and 25 months in the ICT arm (hazard ratio of 0.60 [95% CI 0.31-1.16], p = 0.127). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events (mainly fatigue, dysphagia, breathlessness, and anorexia) were reported for 13 (57%) CHART and 13 (65%) ICT patients. Conclusions: This small randomized trial indicates that ICT followed by CHART is feasible and well tolerated. Despite closing early because of poor accrual, and so failing to show clear evidence of a survival benefit for the additional chemotherapy, the results suggest that CHART, and ICT before CHART, remain important options for the treatment of inoperable NSCLC and deserve further study.« less