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Title: Common plant toxicology: A comparison of national and Southwest Ohio data trends on plant poisonings in the 21st century

Abstract

Data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) and the Cincinnati-based Drug and Poison Information Center (DPIC) were analyzed to determine the incidence and trends of human plant poisonings since the year 2000. Approximately 3.4% of the approximately 4.3 million annual calls to the AAPCC centers involved plants, with a higher fraction (4.5%) for pediatric exposures. Nearly 70% of plant exposures occurred in children under six. Only 8% of cases required treatment in a health-care facility, and only 0.1% (in 2008) were considered severe outcomes. The most prominent groups of plants involved in exposures are those containing oxalates, and the most common symptom is gastroenteritis. The top 12 identified plants (in descending order) nationally were Spathiphyllum species (peace lilly), Philodendron species (philodendron), Euphorbia pulcherrima (poinssettia), Ilex species (holly), Phytolacca americana (pokeweed), Toxicodendron radicans (poison ivy), Capsicum (pepper), Ficus (rubber tree, weeping fig), Crassula argentea (jade plant), Diffenbachia (dumb cane), Epipremnum areum (pothos) and Schlumbergera bridesii (Christmas cactus). Broad overlaps between the DPIC and the AAPCC incidence data were noted, with essentially the same plant species in each dataset. The nature of the various toxins, the symptomatology and potential treatments are discussed for the highest ranking plant species.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21587789
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 254; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: TRAC 2008/2009 meeting: 2008 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference;2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference, West Chester, OH (United States);West Chester, OH (United States), 14-17 Apr 2008;27-30 Apr 2009; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2010.10.022; PII: S0041-008X(10)00415-1; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0041-008X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CACTI; CAPSICUM; CHILDREN; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CONTROL; DRUGS; OHIO; PEPPERS; POISONING; RUBBER TREES; SYMPTOMS; TOXINS; AGE GROUPS; ANIMALS; ANTIGENS; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; EUPHORBIA; EVALUATION; FOOD; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; MAGNOLIOPHYTA; MAGNOLIOPSIDA; MAMMALS; MAN; MATERIALS; NORTH AMERICA; PLANTS; PRIMATES; TOXIC MATERIALS; TREES; USA; VEGETABLES; VERTEBRATES

Citation Formats

Petersen, Dan D., E-mail: petersen.dan@epa.gov. Common plant toxicology: A comparison of national and Southwest Ohio data trends on plant poisonings in the 21st century. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2010.10.022.
Petersen, Dan D., E-mail: petersen.dan@epa.gov. Common plant toxicology: A comparison of national and Southwest Ohio data trends on plant poisonings in the 21st century. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2010.10.022.
Petersen, Dan D., E-mail: petersen.dan@epa.gov. Fri . "Common plant toxicology: A comparison of national and Southwest Ohio data trends on plant poisonings in the 21st century". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2010.10.022.
@article{osti_21587789,
title = {Common plant toxicology: A comparison of national and Southwest Ohio data trends on plant poisonings in the 21st century},
author = {Petersen, Dan D., E-mail: petersen.dan@epa.gov},
abstractNote = {Data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) and the Cincinnati-based Drug and Poison Information Center (DPIC) were analyzed to determine the incidence and trends of human plant poisonings since the year 2000. Approximately 3.4% of the approximately 4.3 million annual calls to the AAPCC centers involved plants, with a higher fraction (4.5%) for pediatric exposures. Nearly 70% of plant exposures occurred in children under six. Only 8% of cases required treatment in a health-care facility, and only 0.1% (in 2008) were considered severe outcomes. The most prominent groups of plants involved in exposures are those containing oxalates, and the most common symptom is gastroenteritis. The top 12 identified plants (in descending order) nationally were Spathiphyllum species (peace lilly), Philodendron species (philodendron), Euphorbia pulcherrima (poinssettia), Ilex species (holly), Phytolacca americana (pokeweed), Toxicodendron radicans (poison ivy), Capsicum (pepper), Ficus (rubber tree, weeping fig), Crassula argentea (jade plant), Diffenbachia (dumb cane), Epipremnum areum (pothos) and Schlumbergera bridesii (Christmas cactus). Broad overlaps between the DPIC and the AAPCC incidence data were noted, with essentially the same plant species in each dataset. The nature of the various toxins, the symptomatology and potential treatments are discussed for the highest ranking plant species.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2010.10.022},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
issn = {0041-008X},
number = 2,
volume = 254,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {7}
}