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Title: Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

Abstract

A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
214831
Report Number(s):
CONF-950801-
TRN: 96:000922-0307
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 210. national meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Chicago, IL (United States), 20-25 Aug 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of 210th ACS national meeting. Part 1 and 2; PB: 1866 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; NATURAL GAS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; SOURCE ROCKS; MINERALOGY; PERMEABILITY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Ortoleva, P.J., Chang, K.A., and Maxwell, J.M. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Ortoleva, P.J., Chang, K.A., & Maxwell, J.M. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling. United States.
Ortoleva, P.J., Chang, K.A., and Maxwell, J.M. 1995. "Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_214831,
title = {Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling},
author = {Ortoleva, P.J. and Chang, K.A. and Maxwell, J.M.},
abstractNote = {A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Conference:
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