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Title: Observations of the long distance exploding wire restrike mechanism

Abstract

An exploding wire restrike mechanism is applied to create plasma paths up to 9 m in length. The mechanism uses enameled copper wires in a 5 to 10 kV/m region of average electric field (AEF). This relatively low AEF restrike mechanism appears to be linked to the formation of plasma beads along the wire's length. Voltage traces, measurement of relative emitted light intensity and photographs are presented at AEFs below, inside and above the identified restrike region.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800 Christchurch (New Zealand)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21476444
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3481385; (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; COPPER; ELECTRIC FIELDS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; EXPLODING WIRES; IMAGES; PHOTOGRAPHY; PLASMA; PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS; PLASMA PRODUCTION; VISIBLE RADIATION; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELEMENTS; METALS; RADIATIONS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; WIRES

Citation Formats

Sinton, Rowan, Herel, Ryan van, Enright, Wade, and Bodger, Pat. Observations of the long distance exploding wire restrike mechanism. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3481385.
Sinton, Rowan, Herel, Ryan van, Enright, Wade, & Bodger, Pat. Observations of the long distance exploding wire restrike mechanism. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3481385.
Sinton, Rowan, Herel, Ryan van, Enright, Wade, and Bodger, Pat. 2010. "Observations of the long distance exploding wire restrike mechanism". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3481385.
@article{osti_21476444,
title = {Observations of the long distance exploding wire restrike mechanism},
author = {Sinton, Rowan and Herel, Ryan van and Enright, Wade and Bodger, Pat},
abstractNote = {An exploding wire restrike mechanism is applied to create plasma paths up to 9 m in length. The mechanism uses enameled copper wires in a 5 to 10 kV/m region of average electric field (AEF). This relatively low AEF restrike mechanism appears to be linked to the formation of plasma beads along the wire's length. Voltage traces, measurement of relative emitted light intensity and photographs are presented at AEFs below, inside and above the identified restrike region.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3481385},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 9
}
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