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Title: Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease

Abstract

Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 {mu}m resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres ({approx}30 {mu}m) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons ofmore » 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]; ;  [3];  [2]; ; ;  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science, Monash University, 3800 Clayton (Australia)
  2. (Australia)
  3. Department of Physiology, Monash University, 3800 Clayton (Australia)
  4. National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Suita (Japan)
  5. Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 679-5198 Harima (Japan)
  6. Department of Clinical Radiology, Hiroshima International University, 724-0695 Kurose (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21415288
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1266; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 6. international conference on medical applications of synchrotron radiation, Melbourne (Australia), 15-18 Feb 2010; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3478204; (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ARTERIOSCLEROSIS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD VESSELS; CONTRAST MEDIA; HEART; HEART FAILURE; HYPERTENSION; IODINE; MAINTENANCE; MORTALITY; MUSCLES; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; RADIOTHERAPY; RECEPTORS; RESOLUTION; SPRING-8 STORAGE RING; STEADY-STATE CONDITIONS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; X RADIATION; BODY; BREMSSTRAHLUNG; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DISEASES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELEMENTS; HALOGENS; IONIZING RADIATIONS; MEDICINE; MEMBRANE PROTEINS; NONMETALS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PROTEINS; RADIATION SOURCES; RADIATIONS; RADIOLOGY; STORAGE RINGS; SYMPTOMS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES; THERAPY; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Pearson, James T., Department of Physiology, Monash University, 3800 Clayton, Schwenke, Daryl O., Eppel, Gabriela A., Evans, Roger G., Jenkins, Mathew J., Edgley, Amanda J., Department of Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, 3065 Fitzroy, Sonobe, Takashi, Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue, Shirai, Mikiyasu, Umetani, Keiji, and Okura, Yasuhiko. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3478204.
Pearson, James T., Department of Physiology, Monash University, 3800 Clayton, Schwenke, Daryl O., Eppel, Gabriela A., Evans, Roger G., Jenkins, Mathew J., Edgley, Amanda J., Department of Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, 3065 Fitzroy, Sonobe, Takashi, Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue, Shirai, Mikiyasu, Umetani, Keiji, & Okura, Yasuhiko. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3478204.
Pearson, James T., Department of Physiology, Monash University, 3800 Clayton, Schwenke, Daryl O., Eppel, Gabriela A., Evans, Roger G., Jenkins, Mathew J., Edgley, Amanda J., Department of Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, 3065 Fitzroy, Sonobe, Takashi, Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue, Shirai, Mikiyasu, Umetani, Keiji, and Okura, Yasuhiko. Fri . "Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3478204.
@article{osti_21415288,
title = {Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease},
author = {Pearson, James T. and Department of Physiology, Monash University, 3800 Clayton and Schwenke, Daryl O. and Eppel, Gabriela A. and Evans, Roger G. and Jenkins, Mathew J. and Edgley, Amanda J. and Department of Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, University of Melbourne, 3065 Fitzroy and Sonobe, Takashi and Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue and Shirai, Mikiyasu and Umetani, Keiji and Okura, Yasuhiko},
abstractNote = {Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 {mu}m resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres ({approx}30 {mu}m) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons of 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3478204},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1266,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 23 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Fri Jul 23 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}