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Title: Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields

Abstract

In addition to producing loud gravitational waves, the dynamics of a binary black hole system could induce emission of electromagnetic radiation by affecting the behavior of plasmas and electromagnetic fields in their vicinity. We study how the electromagnetic fields are affected by a pair of orbiting black holes through the merger. In particular, we show how the binary's dynamics induce a variability in possible electromagnetically induced emissions as well as an enhancement of electromagnetic fields during the late-merge and merger epochs. These time dependent features will likely leave their imprint in processes generating detectable emissions and can be exploited in the detection of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA), Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)
  2. (Germany)
  3. Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)
  4. (Canada)
  5. (CIFAR), Cosmology and Gravity Program (Canada)
  6. Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21409593
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 81; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.81.084007; (c) 2010 The American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; DETECTION; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; EMISSION; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; PLASMA; TIME DEPENDENCE; RADIATIONS

Citation Formats

Palenzuela, Carlos, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Berlin, D-14476 Golm, Lehner, Luis, Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canadian Institute For Advanced Research, and Yoshida, Shin. Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.81.084007.
Palenzuela, Carlos, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Berlin, D-14476 Golm, Lehner, Luis, Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canadian Institute For Advanced Research, & Yoshida, Shin. Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.81.084007.
Palenzuela, Carlos, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Berlin, D-14476 Golm, Lehner, Luis, Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canadian Institute For Advanced Research, and Yoshida, Shin. 2010. "Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.81.084007.
@article{osti_21409593,
title = {Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields},
author = {Palenzuela, Carlos and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Berlin, D-14476 Golm and Lehner, Luis and Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 and Canadian Institute For Advanced Research and Yoshida, Shin},
abstractNote = {In addition to producing loud gravitational waves, the dynamics of a binary black hole system could induce emission of electromagnetic radiation by affecting the behavior of plasmas and electromagnetic fields in their vicinity. We study how the electromagnetic fields are affected by a pair of orbiting black holes through the merger. In particular, we show how the binary's dynamics induce a variability in possible electromagnetically induced emissions as well as an enhancement of electromagnetic fields during the late-merge and merger epochs. These time dependent features will likely leave their imprint in processes generating detectable emissions and can be exploited in the detection of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.81.084007},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 8,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 4
}
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