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Title: Current Management of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

Abstract

Primary central nervous cell lymphoma (PCNSL) is an uncommon neoplasm of the brain, leptomeninges, and rarely the spinal cord. Initially thought to be characteristically associated with congenital, iatrogenic, or acquired immunosuppression, PCNSL is now recognized with increasing frequency in immunocompetent individuals. The role of surgery is limited to establishing diagnosis, as PCNSL is often multifocal with a propensity to involve the subarachnoid space. A whole-brain radiation volume has empirically been used to adequately address the multifocal tumor frequently encountered at the time of PCNSL diagnosis. Despite high rates of response after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), rapid recurrence is common and long-term survival is the exception. Chemotherapy alone or in combination with WBRT has more recently become the treatment of choice. Most effective regimens contain high-dose methotrexate and or other agents that are capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. High response rates and improved survival with the use of chemotherapy has led to treatment strategies that defer or eliminate WBRT in hopes of lessening the risk of neurotoxicity attributed to WBRT. Unfortunately, elimination of WBRT is also associated with a higher rate of relapse. Combined chemotherapy and WBRT regimens are now being explored that use lower total doses of radiation and alteredmore » fractionation schedules with the aim of maintaining high rates of tumor control while minimizing neurotoxicity. Pretreatment, multifactor prognostic indices have recently been described that may allow selection of treatment regimens that strike an appropriate balance of risk and benefit for the individual PCNSL patient.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21372086
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.10.011; PII: S0360-3016(09)03389-6; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BRAIN; CHEMOTHERAPY; IMMUNOSUPPRESSION; LYMPHOMAS; METHOTREXATE; RADIOTHERAPY; SPINAL CORD; ANTIMETABOLITES; BODY; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; DISEASES; DRUGS; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; NERVOUS SYSTEM; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANS; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Schultz, Christopher J., and Bovi, Joseph, E-mail: jbovi@mcw.ed. Current Management of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.10.011.
Schultz, Christopher J., & Bovi, Joseph, E-mail: jbovi@mcw.ed. Current Management of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.10.011.
Schultz, Christopher J., and Bovi, Joseph, E-mail: jbovi@mcw.ed. Mon . "Current Management of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.10.011.
@article{osti_21372086,
title = {Current Management of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma},
author = {Schultz, Christopher J. and Bovi, Joseph, E-mail: jbovi@mcw.ed},
abstractNote = {Primary central nervous cell lymphoma (PCNSL) is an uncommon neoplasm of the brain, leptomeninges, and rarely the spinal cord. Initially thought to be characteristically associated with congenital, iatrogenic, or acquired immunosuppression, PCNSL is now recognized with increasing frequency in immunocompetent individuals. The role of surgery is limited to establishing diagnosis, as PCNSL is often multifocal with a propensity to involve the subarachnoid space. A whole-brain radiation volume has empirically been used to adequately address the multifocal tumor frequently encountered at the time of PCNSL diagnosis. Despite high rates of response after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), rapid recurrence is common and long-term survival is the exception. Chemotherapy alone or in combination with WBRT has more recently become the treatment of choice. Most effective regimens contain high-dose methotrexate and or other agents that are capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. High response rates and improved survival with the use of chemotherapy has led to treatment strategies that defer or eliminate WBRT in hopes of lessening the risk of neurotoxicity attributed to WBRT. Unfortunately, elimination of WBRT is also associated with a higher rate of relapse. Combined chemotherapy and WBRT regimens are now being explored that use lower total doses of radiation and altered fractionation schedules with the aim of maintaining high rates of tumor control while minimizing neurotoxicity. Pretreatment, multifactor prognostic indices have recently been described that may allow selection of treatment regimens that strike an appropriate balance of risk and benefit for the individual PCNSL patient.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.10.011},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2010},
month = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2010}
}
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, toxicity, and survival of whole-brain radiotherapy-treated (WBRT) and high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP)-treated in elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Methods and Materials: Patients with PCNSL who were 70 years and older received 1 g of methylprednisolone daily for 5 days, 30 days after WBRT. Patients then received 1 g of methylprednisolone every 28 days until progression. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) at 6 months. Results were compared with those in patients on the previous North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) trial who received pre-WBRT cytoxan,more » adriamycin, vincristine, prednisone (CHOP) and high-dose cytarabine (CHOP-WBRT). A planned interim analysis was performed. The current regimen would be considered inactive if survival was not improved from patients treated with CHOP-WBRT. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued between 1998 and 2003. Median age was 76 years. Interim analysis revealed a 6-month survival of 33%, resulting in closure of the trial. Toxicity, OS, and event-free survival (EFS) were similar to those in patients more than 70 years of age who received CHOP-WBRT. The subgroup of patients who received HDMP had longer OS (12.1 vs. 7.0 months, p = 0.76) and EFS (11.7 vs. 4.0 months, p = 0.04) compared with the CHOP-WBRT patients alive 60 days after the start of treatment. Conclusions: Patients on-study long enough to receive HDMP had prolongation of OS and EFS compared to patients receiving CHOP-WBRT. Although the numbers of patients are too small for statistical conclusions, the HDMP regimen deserves further study.« less
  • Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare disease. Seven patients were seen and treated at the University of Michigan Medical Center between January 1969 and December 1983. All patients had histologically proven diagnoses of large cell lymphoma with clinical and radiologic evidence of involvement limited to the CNS. Five of seven patients received postoperative radiation therapy, two of whom have had apparent local control at 1- and 2-year follow-up. The two patients without postoperative radiation died of local recurrence 2 and 3 months following subtotal resection. These poor results suggest that adjuvant therapy may bemore » required for improved control of this type of extranodal lymphoma.« less
  • Purpose: To assess, in a multicenter setting, the long-term outcomes of a brief course of high-dose methotrexate followed by radiotherapy for patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients were entered in a Phase II protocol consisting of methotrexate (1 g/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8), followed by whole-brain irradiation (45-50.4 Gy). The median follow-up time was 7 years, with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Results: The 5-year survival estimate was 37% ({+-}14%, 95% confidence interval [CI]), with progression-free survival being 36% ({+-}15%, 95% CI), and median survival 36 months. Of the originalmore » 46 patients, 10 were alive, all without evidence of disease recurrence. A total of 11 patients have developed neurotoxicity, with the actuarial risk being 30% ({+-}18%, 95% CI) at 5 years but continuing to increase. For patients aged >60 years the risk of neurotoxicity at 7 years was 58% ({+-}30%, 95% CI). Conclusion: Combined-modality therapy, based on high-dose methotrexate, results in improved survival outcomes in PCNSL. The risk of neurotoxicity for patients aged >60 years is unacceptable with this regimen, although survival outcomes for patients aged >60 years were higher than in many other series.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), vincristine, and dexamethasone (CHOD) plus bis-chloronitrosourea (BCNU), cytosine arabinoside, and methotrexate (BVAM) followed by whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) for patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Methods and Materials: Patients 70 years old and younger with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven PCNSL received one cycle of CHOD followed by two cycles of BVAM. Patients then received WBRT, 30.6 Gy, if a complete response was evoked, or 50.4 Gy if the response was less than complete; both doses were given in 1.8-Gy daily fractions. The primary efficacy endpoint wasmore » 1-year survival. Results: Thirty-six patients (19 men, 17 women) enrolled between 1995 and 2000. Median age was 60.5 years (range, 34 to 69 years). Thirty (83%) patients had baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scores of 0 to 1. All 36 patients were eligible for survival and response evaluations. Median time to progression was 12.3 months, and median survival was 18.5 months. The percentages of patients alive at 1, 2, and 3 years were 64%, 36%, and 33%, respectively. The best response was complete response in 10 patients and immediate progression in 7 patients. Ten (28%) patients had at least one grade 3 or higher neurologic toxicity. Conclusions: This regimen did improve the survival of PCNSL patients but also caused substantial toxicity. The improvement in survival is less than that reported with high-dose methotrexate-based therapies.« less
  • In 38 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) by malignant lymphoma developed during an eight year period. All patients had lymphomatous meningitis; clinical involvement of the spinal nerves or cranial nerves suggested the diagnosis. Spinal fluid was abnormal in 97% of the patients although a positive cytology could be documented in only 67% by lumbar puncture. The histology in 82% of the patients was diffuse. Involvement of the CNS in nodular lymphoma was uncommon (3%), and the histology in virtually all of these patients had converted to diffuse. At the time of diagnosis of CNSmore » disease, 95% of the patients had other evidence of advanced disease; 66% had bone marrow involvement. In only 18% of the patients did CNS disease develop while they werin clinical remission. Eighty-five percent of the patients treated with whole brain irradiation and intrathecal chemotherapy had a good clinical response. Knowledge of these risk factors permits definition of a group of patients who may benefit from CNS prophylaxis.« less