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Title: Factors for Predicting Rectal Dose of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy After Pelvic Irradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: A Retrospective Study With Radiography-Based Dosimetry

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the predictive factors for rectal dose of the first fraction of high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1993 through February 2008, 946 patients undergoing pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT were analyzed. Examination under anesthesia (EUA) at the first implantation of the applicator was usually performed in the early period. Rectal point was determined radiographically according to the 38th Report of the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). The ICRU rectal dose (PRD) as a percentage of point A dose was calculated; multiple linear regression models were used to predict PRD. Results: Factors influencing successful rectal dose calculation were EUA (p < 0.001) and absence of diabetes (p = 0.047). Age (p < 0.001), body weight (p = 0.002), diabetes (p = 0.020), and EUA (p < 0.001) were independent factors for the PRD. The predictive equation derived from the regression model was PRD (%) = 57.002 + 0.443 x age (years) - 0.257 x body weight (kg) + 6.028 x diabetes (no: 0; yes: 1) - 8.325 x EUA (no: 0; yes: 1) Conclusion: Rectal dose at the first fraction of HDR-ICBT is positively influenced by age andmore » diabetes, and negatively correlated with EUA and body weight. A small fraction size at point A may be considered in patients with a potentially high rectal dose to reduce the biologically effective dose if the ICRU rectal dose has not been immediately obtained in the first fraction of HDR-ICBT.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China)
  2. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21372065
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.02.018; PII: S0360-3016(09)00261-2; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRACHYTHERAPY; DOSE RATES; DOSIMETRY; NEOPLASMS; PELVIS; RECTUM; UROGENITAL SYSTEM DISEASES; BODY; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; INTESTINES; LARGE INTESTINE; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ORGANS; RADIOLOGY; RADIOTHERAPY; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Huang Engyen, E-mail: huangengyen@giga.net.t, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Wang Chongjong, Lan Jenhong, Chen Huichun, Fang Fumin, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Hsu, H.-C., School of Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Huang Yujie, Wang Changyu, and Wang Yuming. Factors for Predicting Rectal Dose of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy After Pelvic Irradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: A Retrospective Study With Radiography-Based Dosimetry. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.02.018.
Huang Engyen, E-mail: huangengyen@giga.net.t, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Wang Chongjong, Lan Jenhong, Chen Huichun, Fang Fumin, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Hsu, H.-C., School of Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Huang Yujie, Wang Changyu, & Wang Yuming. Factors for Predicting Rectal Dose of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy After Pelvic Irradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: A Retrospective Study With Radiography-Based Dosimetry. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.02.018.
Huang Engyen, E-mail: huangengyen@giga.net.t, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Wang Chongjong, Lan Jenhong, Chen Huichun, Fang Fumin, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Hsu, H.-C., School of Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan, Huang Yujie, Wang Changyu, and Wang Yuming. 2010. "Factors for Predicting Rectal Dose of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy After Pelvic Irradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: A Retrospective Study With Radiography-Based Dosimetry". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.02.018.
@article{osti_21372065,
title = {Factors for Predicting Rectal Dose of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy After Pelvic Irradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: A Retrospective Study With Radiography-Based Dosimetry},
author = {Huang Engyen, E-mail: huangengyen@giga.net.t and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan and Wang Chongjong and Lan Jenhong and Chen Huichun and Fang Fumin and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan and Hsu, H.-C. and School of Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan and Huang Yujie and Wang Changyu and Wang Yuming},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the predictive factors for rectal dose of the first fraction of high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1993 through February 2008, 946 patients undergoing pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT were analyzed. Examination under anesthesia (EUA) at the first implantation of the applicator was usually performed in the early period. Rectal point was determined radiographically according to the 38th Report of the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). The ICRU rectal dose (PRD) as a percentage of point A dose was calculated; multiple linear regression models were used to predict PRD. Results: Factors influencing successful rectal dose calculation were EUA (p < 0.001) and absence of diabetes (p = 0.047). Age (p < 0.001), body weight (p = 0.002), diabetes (p = 0.020), and EUA (p < 0.001) were independent factors for the PRD. The predictive equation derived from the regression model was PRD (%) = 57.002 + 0.443 x age (years) - 0.257 x body weight (kg) + 6.028 x diabetes (no: 0; yes: 1) - 8.325 x EUA (no: 0; yes: 1) Conclusion: Rectal dose at the first fraction of HDR-ICBT is positively influenced by age and diabetes, and negatively correlated with EUA and body weight. A small fraction size at point A may be considered in patients with a potentially high rectal dose to reduce the biologically effective dose if the ICRU rectal dose has not been immediately obtained in the first fraction of HDR-ICBT.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.02.018},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 2
}
  • Purpose: To compare the dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters obtained by three-dimensional gynecologic brachytherapy planning with the rectosigmoid mucosal changes observed by flexible sigmoidoscopy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2004 and July 2005, 71 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB-IIIB uterine cervical cancer underwent computed tomography-based high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. The total dose (external beam radiotherapy [RT] plus intracavitary brachytherapy) to the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements rectal point (ICRU{sub RP}) and DVH parameters for rectosigmoid colon were calculated using the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions ({alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy). Sigmoidoscopy was performed every 6 monthsmore » after RT, with the 6-scale scoring system used to determine mucosal changes. Results: The mean values of the DVH parameters and ICRU{sub RP} were significantly greater in patients with a score of {>=}2 than in those with a score <2 at 12 months after RT (ICRU{sub RP}, 71 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3} vs. 66 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3}, p = 0.02; D{sub 0.1cc}, 93 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3} vs. 85 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3}, p = 0.04; D{sub 1cc}, 80 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3} vs. 73 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3}, p = 0.02; D{sub 2cc}, 75 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3} vs. 69 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3}, p = 0.02). The probability of a score of {>=}2 showed a significant relationship with the DVH parameters and ICRU{sub RP} (ICRU{sub RP}, p = 0.03; D{sub 0.1cc}, p = 0.05; D{sub 1cc}, p = 0.02; D{sub 2cc}, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Our preliminary data have shown that DVH values of the rectosigmoid colon obtained by computed tomography-based three-dimensional brachytherapy planning are reliable and predictive of score {>=}2 rectosigmoid mucosal changes.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a definitive radiotherapy protocol using high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a low cumulative dose schedule in nonbulky early-stage cervical cancer patients, we conducted a prospective multi-institutional study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix, Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages Ib1, IIa, and IIb, tumor size <40 mm in diameter (assessed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging), and no pelvic/para-aortic lymphadenopathy. The treatment protocol consisted of whole-pelvis external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 20 Gy/10 fractions, pelvic EBRT with midline block of 30 Gy/15 fractions, and HDR-ICBTmore » of 24 Gy/4 fractions (at point A). The cumulative biologically effective dose (BED) was 62 Gy{sub 10} ({alpha}/{beta} = 10) at point A. The primary endpoint was the 2-year pelvic disease progression-free (PDPF) rate. All patients received a radiotherapy quality assurance review. Results: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 60 eligible patients were enrolled. Thirty-six patients were assessed with FIGO stage Ib1; 12 patients with stage IIa; and 12 patients with stage IIb. Median tumor diameter was 28 mm (range, 6-39 mm). Median overall treatment time was 43 days. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 7-72 months). Seven patients developed recurrences: 3 patients had pelvic recurrences (2 central, 1 nodal), and 4 patients had distant metastases. The 2-year PDPF was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-100%). The 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% (95% CI, 82%-98%) and 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%), respectively. The 2-year late complication rates (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer of Grade {>=}1) were 18% (95% CI, 8%-28%) for large intestine/rectum, 4% (95% CI, 0%-8%) for small intestine, and 0% for bladder. No Grade {>=}3 cases were observed for genitourinary/gastrointestinal late complications. Conclusions: These results suggest that definitive radiotherapy using HDR-ICBT with a low cumulative dose schedule (BED, 62 Gy{sub 10} at point A) can provide excellent local control without severe toxicity in nonbulky (<4-cm) early-stage cervical cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the treatment results of 2 fractionation schedules for high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2001 through January 2008, 267 patients with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent 4-field pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT. The median central and parametrial doses were 39.6 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. Patient underwent either 6 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 (HDR-4) (n=144) or 4.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 6 (HDR-6) (n=123) to point A of ICBT using {sup 192}Ir isotope twice weekly. The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, proctitis, cystitis,more » and enterocolitis were compared between HDR-4 and HDR-6. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic data between HDR-4 and HDR-6 except for total treatment time. The 5-year proctitis rates were 23.0% and 21.5% in HDR-4 and HDR-6 (P=.399), respectively. The corresponding rates of grade 2-4 proctitis were 18.7% and 9.6% (P=.060). The corresponding rates of grades 3-4 proctitis were 5.2% and 1.3% (P=.231). Subgroup analysis revealed that HDR-4 significantly increased grade 2-4 proctitis in patients aged {>=}62 years old (P=.012) but not in patients aged <62 years (P=.976). The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were not significantly different between HDR-4 and HDR-6 schedules. Conclusion: The small fraction size of HDR-ICBT is associated with grade 2 proctitis without compromise of prognosis in elderly patients. This schedule is suggested for patients who tolerate an additional 2 applications of HDR-ICBT.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the physics contributions and clinical outcome with three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-guided pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The data from 45 patients with primary locally advanced cervical carcinoma were analyzed. The median tumor cervical volume was 64.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 3-178). Of the 45 patients, 24 (53%) had histologic and/or radiologic pelvic involvement. After pelvic with or without para-aortic concomitant chemoradiotherapy, a PDR brachytherapy boost was delivered to a three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-based clinical target volume, taking into account the dose-volume constraints for critical organs and optimization of the target volume coverage.more » Results: At a median follow-up of 26 months (range, 9-47), the 2-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 78% and 73%, respectively. At the last follow-up visit, the disease of all patients remained locally controlled. Adding external beam radiotherapy and PDR using the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions model, the median dose received by 100% and 90% of the target was 54.4 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 10} and 63.5 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 10} for the intermediate-risk clinical target volume and 61.6 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 10} and 74.9 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 10} for the high-risk clinical target volume, respectively. Of the 45 patients, 23 and 2 developed acute Grade 1-2 and Grade 3 complications, respectively; 21 patients presented with delayed Grade 1-2 complications. One other patient presented with Grade 3 vesicovaginal fistula. No Grade 4 or greater complications, whether acute or delayed, were observed. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided PDR brachytherapy with optimization integrating the limits of tolerance to critical organs allows for excellent local control rates. Moreover, the present results have confirmed that the ability to optimize dwell times can contribute to an improvement in local control rates with a low level of late side effects.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT), with special emphasis on the relationship between the incidence of rectal bleeding and the rectal dose from HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 100 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT for {>=}12 months were analyzed. The fractionation schema for HDR brachytherapy was prospectively changed, and the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The distribution of the fractionation schema used in the patients was as follows: 5 Gy xmore » 5 in 13 patients; 7 Gy x 3 in 19 patients; and 9 Gy x 2 in 68 patients. Results: Ten patients (10%) developed Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. Regarding the correlation with dosimetric factors, no significant differences were found in the average percentage of the entire rectal volume receiving 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose from EBRT between those with bleeding and those without. The average percentage of the entire rectal volume receiving 10%, 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose from HDR brachytherapy in those who developed rectal bleeding was 77.9%, 28.6%, 9.0%, 1.5%, and 0.3%, respectively, and was 69.2%, 22.2%, 6.6%, 0.9%, and 0.4%, respectively, in those without bleeding. The differences in the percentages of the entire rectal volume receiving 10%, 30%, and 50% between those with and without bleeding were statistically significant. Conclusions: The rectal dose from HDR brachytherapy for patients with prostate cancer may have a significant impact on the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding.« less