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Title: Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for unresectable retroperitoneal sarcomas with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: From May 1997 to February 2006, 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) with unresectable retroperitoneal sarcoma received CIRT. Age ranged from 16 to 77 years (median, 48.6 years). Of the patients, 16 had primary disease and 8 recurrent disease. Histologic diagnoses were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 6, liposarcoma in 3, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3, Ewing/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, and miscellaneous in 10 patients. The histologic grades were as follows: Grade 3 in 15, Grade 2-3 in 2, Grade 2 in 3, and unknown in 4. Clinical target volumes ranged between 57 cm{sup 3} and 1,194 cm{sup 3} (median 525 cm{sup 3}). The delivered carbon ion dose ranged from 52.8 to 73.6 GyE in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-143 months). The overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 75% and 50%, respectively. The local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 77% and 69%. No complications of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered. Nomore » other toxicity greater than Grade 2 was observed. Conclusions: Use of CIRT is suggested to be effective and safe for retroperitoneal sarcomas. The results obtained with CIRT were a good overall survival rate and local control, notwithstanding the fact that most patients were not eligible for surgical resection and had high-grade sarcomas.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)
  2. Department of Radiology, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21367508
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.12.019; PII: S0360-3016(08)03915-1; Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARBON IONS; PERITONEUM; RADIOTHERAPY; SARCOMAS; SURVIVAL CURVES; CHARGED PARTICLES; DISEASES; IONS; MEDICINE; MEMBRANES; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIOLOGY; SEROUS MEMBRANES; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Serizawa, Itsuko, E-mail: s_itsuko@nirs.go.j, Kagei, Kenji, Kamada, Tadashi, Imai, Reiko, Sugahara, Shinji, Okada, Tohru, Tsuji, Hiroshi, Ito, Hisao, and Tsujii, Hirohiko. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.12.019.
Serizawa, Itsuko, E-mail: s_itsuko@nirs.go.j, Kagei, Kenji, Kamada, Tadashi, Imai, Reiko, Sugahara, Shinji, Okada, Tohru, Tsuji, Hiroshi, Ito, Hisao, & Tsujii, Hirohiko. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.12.019.
Serizawa, Itsuko, E-mail: s_itsuko@nirs.go.j, Kagei, Kenji, Kamada, Tadashi, Imai, Reiko, Sugahara, Shinji, Okada, Tohru, Tsuji, Hiroshi, Ito, Hisao, and Tsujii, Hirohiko. 2009. "Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.12.019.
@article{osti_21367508,
title = {Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas},
author = {Serizawa, Itsuko, E-mail: s_itsuko@nirs.go.j and Kagei, Kenji and Kamada, Tadashi and Imai, Reiko and Sugahara, Shinji and Okada, Tohru and Tsuji, Hiroshi and Ito, Hisao and Tsujii, Hirohiko},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for unresectable retroperitoneal sarcomas with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: From May 1997 to February 2006, 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) with unresectable retroperitoneal sarcoma received CIRT. Age ranged from 16 to 77 years (median, 48.6 years). Of the patients, 16 had primary disease and 8 recurrent disease. Histologic diagnoses were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 6, liposarcoma in 3, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3, Ewing/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, and miscellaneous in 10 patients. The histologic grades were as follows: Grade 3 in 15, Grade 2-3 in 2, Grade 2 in 3, and unknown in 4. Clinical target volumes ranged between 57 cm{sup 3} and 1,194 cm{sup 3} (median 525 cm{sup 3}). The delivered carbon ion dose ranged from 52.8 to 73.6 GyE in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-143 months). The overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 75% and 50%, respectively. The local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 77% and 69%. No complications of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered. No other toxicity greater than Grade 2 was observed. Conclusions: Use of CIRT is suggested to be effective and safe for retroperitoneal sarcomas. The results obtained with CIRT were a good overall survival rate and local control, notwithstanding the fact that most patients were not eligible for surgical resection and had high-grade sarcomas.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.12.019},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month =
}
  • Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE.more » Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.« less
  • Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the treatment outcomes of particle therapy using protons or carbon ions for unresectable or incompletely resected bone and soft tissue sarcomas (BSTSs) of the pelvis. Methods and Materials: From May 2005 to December 2014, 91 patients with nonmetastatic histologically proven unresectable or incompletely resected pelvic BSTSs underwent particle therapy with curative intent. The particle therapy used protons (52 patients) or carbon ions (39 patients). All patients received a dose of 70.4 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness) in 32 fractions (55 patients) or 16 fractions (36 patients). Results: The median patient age was 67 years (range 18-87). The median planning targetmore » volume (PTV) was 455 cm{sup 3} (range 108-1984). The histologic type was chordoma in 53 patients, chondrosarcoma in 14, osteosarcoma in 10, malignant fibrous histiocytoma/undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in 5, and other in 9 patients. Of the 91 patients, 82 had a primary tumor and 9 a recurrent tumor. The median follow-up period was 32 months (range 3-112). The 3-year rate of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control was 83%, 72%, and 92%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazards model revealed that chordoma histologic features and a PTV of ≤500 cm{sup 3} were significantly associated with better OS, and a primary tumor and PTV of ≤500 cm{sup 3} were significantly associated with better PFS. Ion type and number of fractions were not significantly associated with OS, PFS, or local control. Late grade ≥3 toxicities were observed in 23 patients. Compared with the 32-fraction protocol, the 16-fraction protocol was associated with significantly more frequent late grade ≥3 toxicities (18 of 36 vs 5 of 55; P<.001). Conclusions: Particle therapy using protons or carbon ions was effective for unresectable or incompletely resected pelvic BSTS, and the 32-fraction protocol was effective and relatively less toxic. Nevertheless, a longer follow-up period is needed to confirm these results.« less
  • Between 1971 and 1982, 23 patients have been treated with radiation therpy at the Massachusetts General Hospital(MGH) for retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcomas. Seventeen patients were treated with curative intent and six with palliative intent. Of the patients treated with curative intent, the 5 year actuarial survivial rate was 54% and the 5 year actuarial local control rate was also 54%. With a complete surgical resection local tumor control was obtained in 5 of 7 patients (71%), 4 of 7 (57%) with incomplete resection and 1/3 (33%) with no resection having local control. The radiation dose appeared to influence tumor controlmore » with 2 of 6 patients (33%) having local control with less than 5,000 cGY compared to 0 of 5 patients with doses of 5,000 to 6,000 cGy and 5 of 6 (83%) with doses greater than 6,000 cGy. An effect of tumor grade on either local control or on rate of metastasis formation could not be demonstrated in this series. Long-term local control and survival appears to be associated with maximal surgical resection and high dose radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate local control, survival outcomes, and complication rates of patients treated with aggressive surgery and radiation therapy (RT) for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 121 consecutive patients treated for RPS with surgery and RT between 1965 and 2012. The most common histology was liposarcoma (n=42; 35%). The median follow-up was 100 months (range: 20-467 months). Eighty-six patients (71%) were treated for initial presentation of RPS, and 35 patients (29%) presented with and were treated for RPS recurrence. RT was preoperative in 88 patients (73%; median dose: 50.4 Gy)more » and postoperative in 33 patients (27%; median dose: 55 Gy). Results: Five-year local control and overall survival rates were 56% and 57%, respectively. Two factors were associated with higher risk of any intra-abdominal recurrence at 5 years: positive or uncertain margins (58% vs 30% for negative margins, P<.001; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-4.8) and disease recurrence after previous resection (76% vs 31% for de novo RPS, P<.001; HR: 4.4; 95% CI: 2.5-7.5). The 10-year complication rate was 5%, and RT-related complications were associated with postoperative RT (P<.001) and RT dose of ≥60 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Intra-abdominal RPS recurrence continues to be a significant challenge despite the use of aggressive surgery and radiation therapy. Given the complications associated with postoperative radiation therapy, we recommend that preoperative radiation therapy is the preferred strategy when combined modality therapy is recommended.« less