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Title: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Anal Cancer With Para-aortic Nodal Involvement

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the rates of toxicity, locoregional control, distant control, and survival in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement, treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 6 patients with squamous cell anal cancer and para-aortic nodal involvement were treated with IMRT and concurrent infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. The primary tumor was treated with a median dose of 57.5 Gy (range, 54-60 Gy), involved para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes were treated with a median dose of 55 Gy (range, 50.5-55 Gy), and noninvolved nodal regions were treated with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 43.5-45 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 25 months, none of the patients had a recurrence at the primary tumor, pelvic/inguinal nodes, or para-aortic nodes, whereas 2 patients developed distant metastases to the liver. Four of the 6 patients are alive. The 3-year actuarial locoregional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 100%, 56%, and 63%, respectively. Four of the 6 patients developed Grade 3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity during chemoradiation. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy could potentially serve as definitive therapy in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodalmore » involvement. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be indicated in these patients, as demonstrated by the distant failure rates. These patients need to be followed carefully because of the potential for treatment-related toxicities.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  2. Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21362216
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.021; PII: S0360-3016(08)03798-X; Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CHEMOTHERAPY; CONTROL; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; NEOPLASMS; RADIOTHERAPY; SURVIVAL CURVES; TOXICITY; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Hodges, Joseph C., Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.or, Eng, Cathy, Reish, Andrew G., Beddar, A. Sam, Delclos, Marc E., Krishnan, Sunil, and Crane, Christopher H. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Anal Cancer With Para-aortic Nodal Involvement. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.021.
Hodges, Joseph C., Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.or, Eng, Cathy, Reish, Andrew G., Beddar, A. Sam, Delclos, Marc E., Krishnan, Sunil, & Crane, Christopher H. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Anal Cancer With Para-aortic Nodal Involvement. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.021.
Hodges, Joseph C., Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.or, Eng, Cathy, Reish, Andrew G., Beddar, A. Sam, Delclos, Marc E., Krishnan, Sunil, and Crane, Christopher H. 2009. "Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Anal Cancer With Para-aortic Nodal Involvement". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.021.
@article{osti_21362216,
title = {Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Anal Cancer With Para-aortic Nodal Involvement},
author = {Hodges, Joseph C. and Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.or and Eng, Cathy and Reish, Andrew G. and Beddar, A. Sam and Delclos, Marc E. and Krishnan, Sunil and Crane, Christopher H.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine the rates of toxicity, locoregional control, distant control, and survival in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement, treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 6 patients with squamous cell anal cancer and para-aortic nodal involvement were treated with IMRT and concurrent infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. The primary tumor was treated with a median dose of 57.5 Gy (range, 54-60 Gy), involved para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes were treated with a median dose of 55 Gy (range, 50.5-55 Gy), and noninvolved nodal regions were treated with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 43.5-45 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 25 months, none of the patients had a recurrence at the primary tumor, pelvic/inguinal nodes, or para-aortic nodes, whereas 2 patients developed distant metastases to the liver. Four of the 6 patients are alive. The 3-year actuarial locoregional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 100%, 56%, and 63%, respectively. Four of the 6 patients developed Grade 3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity during chemoradiation. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy could potentially serve as definitive therapy in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be indicated in these patients, as demonstrated by the distant failure rates. These patients need to be followed carefully because of the potential for treatment-related toxicities.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.021},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month =
}
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence of duodenal toxicity in patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treatment of para-aortic nodes and to identify dosimetric parameters predictive of late duodenal toxicity. Methods and Materials: We identified 105 eligible patients with gynecologic malignancies who were treated with IMRT for gross metastatic disease in the para-aortic nodes from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2009. Patients were treated to a nodal clinical target volume to 45 to 50.4 Gy with a boost to 60 to 66 Gy. The duodenum was contoured, and dosimetric data were exported for analysis. Duodenal toxicity was scoredmore » according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and recursive partitioning analysis were used to determine associations between dosimetric variables and time to toxicity and to identify the optimal threshold that separated patients according to risk of toxicity. Results: Nine of the 105 patients experienced grade 2 to grade 5 duodenal toxicity, confirmed by endoscopy in all cases. The 3-year actuarial rate of any duodenal toxicity was 11.7%. A larger volume of the duodenum receiving 55 Gy (V55) was associated with higher rates of duodenal toxicity. The 3-year actuarial rates of duodenal toxicity with V55 above and below 15 cm{sup 3} were 48.6% and 7.4%, respectively (P<.01). In Cox univariate analysis of dosimetric variables, V55 was associated with duodenal toxicity (P=.029). In recursive partitioning analysis, V55 less than 13.94% segregated all patients with duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT can safely and effectively treat para-aortic nodal disease in gynecologic malignancies, provided that care is taken to limit the dose to the duodenum to reduce the risk of late duodenal toxicity. Limiting V55 to below 15 cm{sup 3} may reduce the risk of duodenal complications. In cases where the treatment cannot be delivered within these constraints, consideration should be given to other treatment approaches such as resection or initial chemotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the significance of CD44 protein expression on the treatment outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) with or without p16 protein expression in the tumor tissue. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 58 OPSCC patients who had undergone radiation therapy and examined the tumor tissue expressions of CD44 and p16 protein by immunohistochemical staining. The correlations between the expressions of these proteins and the patients' treatment outcomes were analyzed. Results: The data of 58 consecutive OPSCC patients who had undergone definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy were analyzed. The male/femalemore » ratio was 55:3, and the median age was 64 years. The clinical stage of the disease was stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 5 patients, stage IVA in 35 patients, and stage IVB in 11 patients. Of the patients, 79% received additional induction and/or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up duration was 34 months. The 3-year overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS) and locoregional control (LRC) rates of all the patients, regardless of the results of immunohistochemistry, were 73%, 64% and 76%, respectively. The PFS and LRC rates in the CD44{sup −} patients (86% and 93%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the CD44{sup +} patients (57% and 70%, respectively). The PFS and LRC rates in the p16{sup +} patients (83% and 90%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the p16{sup −} patients (45% and 61%, respectively). Patients who were CD44{sup −}/p16{sup +} showed the best LRC rates, and those who were CD44{sup +}/p16{sup −} showed the worst PFS and LRC rates among all the groups. Conclusions: Profiling of CD44 and p16 protein expressions by immunohistochemical staining is useful for predicting the treatment outcomes in patients with OPSCC undergoing definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters that correlate with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 33 patients receiving CRT. Pelvic bone (PBM) was contoured for each patient and divided into subsites: ilium, lower pelvis (LP), and lumbosacral spine (LSS). The volume of each region receiving at least 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 Gy was calculated. Endpoints included grade {>=}3 HT (HT3+) and hematologic event (HE), defined as any grade {>=}2 HT with a modification in chemotherapy dose. Normal tissue complication probabilitymore » (NTCP) was evaluated with the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. Logistic regression was used to test associations between HT and dosimetric/clinical parameters. Results: Nine patients experienced HT3+ and 15 patients experienced HE. Constrained optimization of the LKB model for HT3+ yielded the parameters m = 0.175, n = 1, and TD{sub 50} = 32 Gy. With this model, mean PBM doses of 25 Gy, 27.5 Gy, and 31 Gy result in a 10%, 20%, and 40% risk of HT3+, respectively. Compared with patients with mean PBM dose of <30 Gy, patients with mean PBM dose {>=}30 Gy had a 14-fold increase in the odds of developing HT3+ (p = 0.005). Several low-dose radiation parameters (i.e., PBM-V10) were associated with the development of HT3+ and HE. No association was found with the ilium, LP, or clinical factors. Conclusions: LKB modeling confirms the expectation that PBM acts like a parallel organ, implying that the mean dose to the organ is a useful predictor for toxicity. Low-dose radiation to the PBM was also associated with clinically significant HT. Keeping the mean PBM dose <22.5 Gy and <25 Gy is associated with a 5% and 10% risk of HT, respectively.« less
  • Purpose: We examined the impact of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on hospitalization rates in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare population with anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study using the SEER-Medicare database. We identified patients with nonmetastatic anal SCC diagnosed between 2001 and 2011 and treated with chemoradiation therapy. We assessed the relation between IMRT and first hospitalization by use of a multivariate competing-risk model, as well as instrumental variable analysis, using provider IMRT affinity as our instrument. Results: Of the 1165 patients included in our study, 458 (39%) receivedmore » IMRT. IMRT use increased over time and was associated more with regional and provider characteristics than with patient characteristics. The 3- and 6-month cumulative incidences of first hospitalization were 41.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 37.3%-46.4%) and 47.6% (95% CI, 43.0%-52.2%), respectively, for the IMRT cohort and 46.7% (95% CI, 43.0%-50.4%) and 52.1% (95% CI, 48.4%-55.7%), respectively, for the non-IMRT cohort. IMRT was associated with a decreased hazard of first hospitalization compared with 3-dimensional radiation techniques (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.58-0.84; P=.0002). Instrumental variable analysis suggested an even greater reduction in hospitalizations with IMRT after controlling for unmeasured confounders. There was a trend toward improved overall survival with IMRT, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.59-1.00; P=.05). Conclusions: The use of IMRT is associated with reduced hospitalizations in elderly patients with anal SCC. Further work is warranted to understand the long-term health and cost impact of IMRT, particularly for patient subgroups most at risk of toxicity and hospitalization.« less
  • Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) is increasingly used in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCAC). Prevention of locoregional failure (LRF) using IMRT requires appropriate clinical target volume (CTV) definition. To better define the CTV for IMRT, we evaluated patterns and predictors of LRF in SCCAC patients given conventional radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of 180 SCCAC patients treated with conventional radiation with or without chemotherapy at our institution between January 1990 and March 2007. All patients received radiation; the median primary tumor dose was 45 Gy. A total of 173 patients alsomore » received mitomycin-based chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 40 months. Actuarial 3-year colostomy-free survival was 89% and overall survival (OS) 88%. Actuarial 3-year LRF was 23%. A total of 45 patients had LRF, with 35 (78%) occurring locally in the primary site (25 local only, 10 local and regional); however, 20 (44%) had regional components of failure within the pelvis or inguinal nodes (10 regional only, 10 local and regional). Cumulative sites of LRF (patients may have one or more site of failure) were as follows: primary, 35; inguinal, 8; external perianal, 5; common iliac, 4; presacral, 3; distal rectum, 2; external iliac, 2; and internal iliac, 2. All patients with common iliac failure had cT3 or N+ disease. Conclusions: The observed patterns of failure support inclusion of the inguinal and all pelvic nodal groups in the CTV for IMRT. In patients with advanced tumor or nodal stage, common iliac nodes should also be included in the CTV.« less