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Title: Anatomic and Dosimetric Changes During the Treatment Course of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

Abstract

Many patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) have marked anatomic change during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this study, the magnitude of anatomic changes and its dosimetric effects were quantified. Fifteen patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had repeated computed tomography (CT) after 18 fractions. A hybrid plan was made to the anatomy of the second computed tomography scan. The dose of the original plan, hybrid plan, and new plan were compared. The mean volume of left and right parotid decreased 6.19 mL and 6.44 mL, respectively. The transverse diameters of the upper bound of odontoid process, the center of odontoid process, and the center of C2 vertebral body slices contracted with the mean contraction of 8.2 mm, 9.4 mm, and 7.6 mm. Comparing the hybrid plan with the treatment plan, the coverage of target was maintained while the maximum dose to the brain stem and spinal cord increased by 0.08 to 6.51 Gy and 0.05 to 7.8 Gy. The mean dose to left and right parotid increased by 2.97 Gy and 2.57 Gy, respectively. A new plan reduced the dose of spinal cord, brain stem, and parotids. Measurable anatomic changes occurring during the IMRT for locally advanced NPCmore » maintained the coverage of targets but increased the dose to critical organs. Those patients might benefit from replanning.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [4]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)
  2. (China)
  3. (Singapore)
  4. Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China), E-mail: Hucsu62@yahoo.com
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21333983
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Dosimetry; Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.meddos.2009.06.007; PII: S0958-3947(09)00058-2; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BRAIN; CARCINOMAS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; PHARYNX; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SPINAL CORD

Citation Formats

Wang Xin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Lu Jiade, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Hospital, Xiong Xiaopeng, Zhu Guopei, Ying Hongmei, He Shaoqin, Hu Weigang, and Hu Chaosu. Anatomic and Dosimetric Changes During the Treatment Course of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.meddos.2009.06.007.
Wang Xin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Lu Jiade, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Hospital, Xiong Xiaopeng, Zhu Guopei, Ying Hongmei, He Shaoqin, Hu Weigang, & Hu Chaosu. Anatomic and Dosimetric Changes During the Treatment Course of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. United States. doi:10.1016/j.meddos.2009.06.007.
Wang Xin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Lu Jiade, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Hospital, Xiong Xiaopeng, Zhu Guopei, Ying Hongmei, He Shaoqin, Hu Weigang, and Hu Chaosu. 2010. "Anatomic and Dosimetric Changes During the Treatment Course of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma". United States. doi:10.1016/j.meddos.2009.06.007.
@article{osti_21333983,
title = {Anatomic and Dosimetric Changes During the Treatment Course of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma},
author = {Wang Xin and Department of Radiation Oncology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai and Lu Jiade and Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Hospital and Xiong Xiaopeng and Zhu Guopei and Ying Hongmei and He Shaoqin and Hu Weigang and Hu Chaosu},
abstractNote = {Many patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) have marked anatomic change during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this study, the magnitude of anatomic changes and its dosimetric effects were quantified. Fifteen patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had repeated computed tomography (CT) after 18 fractions. A hybrid plan was made to the anatomy of the second computed tomography scan. The dose of the original plan, hybrid plan, and new plan were compared. The mean volume of left and right parotid decreased 6.19 mL and 6.44 mL, respectively. The transverse diameters of the upper bound of odontoid process, the center of odontoid process, and the center of C2 vertebral body slices contracted with the mean contraction of 8.2 mm, 9.4 mm, and 7.6 mm. Comparing the hybrid plan with the treatment plan, the coverage of target was maintained while the maximum dose to the brain stem and spinal cord increased by 0.08 to 6.51 Gy and 0.05 to 7.8 Gy. The mean dose to left and right parotid increased by 2.97 Gy and 2.57 Gy, respectively. A new plan reduced the dose of spinal cord, brain stem, and parotids. Measurable anatomic changes occurring during the IMRT for locally advanced NPC maintained the coverage of targets but increased the dose to critical organs. Those patients might benefit from replanning.},
doi = {10.1016/j.meddos.2009.06.007},
journal = {Medical Dosimetry},
number = 2,
volume = 35,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) technique with fixed-gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: CT datasets of eleven nasopharyngeal-carcinoma patients were included. Dual-arc VMAT and seven-field IMRT plans were created for each case, and were then compared in terms of conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) and delivery time. Results: The D98% (near-minimal dose) of PTV in the VMAT plans was slightly lower than that of the IMRT plans (P < 0.05), while the CI was higher than that of themore » IMRT plans (P < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the HI between the two plans (P > 0.05). Compared with the IMRT plans, the VMAT plans demonstrated lower Dmean (mean dose) of the bilateral temporal lobes and the whole surrounding normal tissue (P < 0.05), but slightly higher Dmean of brainstem (P < 0.05). In terms of the other OARs, no significant differences were found (P > 0.05). The MUs of the VMAT plans (672 ± 112) was significantly lower than that of the IMRT plans (917 ± 206), by 25 ± 13% (P < 0.05). The average delivery time of the VMAT plans (2.3 ± 0.1 min) was less than that of the IMRT plans (5.1 ± 0.4 min), by 54 ± 3%. Conclusion: For locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the VMAT technique could achieve equivalent or superior dose distribution of the target and better protect the bilateral temporal lobes, compared with the IMRT technique. Moreover, it could reduce the MU and delivery time effectively.« less
  • Purpose: Locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients can be salvaged by reirradiation with a substantial degree of radiation-related complications. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is widely used in this regard because of its rapid dose falloff and high geometric precision. The aim of this study was to examine whether the newly developed intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) has any dosimetric advantages over three other stereotactic techniques, including circular arc (CARC), static conformal beam (SmMLC), and dynamic conformal arc (mARC), in treating locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography images of 32 patients with locally recurrent NPC, previously treated with SRT, were retrievedmore » from the stereotactic planning system for contouring and computing treatment plans. Treatment planning of each patient was performed for the four treatment techniques: CARC, SmMLC, mARC, and IMSRT. The conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV) and doses to the organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. Results: All four techniques delivered adequate doses to the PTV. IMSRT, SmMLC, and mARC delivered reasonably conformal and homogenous dose to the PTV (CI <1.47, HI <0.53), but not for CARC (p < 0.05). IMSRT presented with the smallest CI (1.37) and HI (0.40). Among the four techniques, IMSRT spared the greatest number of OARs, namely brainstem, temporal lobes, optic chiasm, and optic nerve, and had the smallest normal tissue volume in the low-dose region. Conclusion: Based on the dosimetric comparison, IMSRT was optimal for locally recurrent NPC by delivering a conformal and homogenous dose to the PTV while sparing OARs.« less
  • Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) technique with fixed-gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique for locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma. Methods: CT datasets of eleven patients were included. Dual-arc VMAT and 7-field IMRT plans, which were created based on the Eclipse treatment planning system, were compared in terms of dose-volume parameters, conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) of planning target volume (PTV), as well as organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, planning time, monitor units (MUs) and delivery time. Results: Compared with the IMRT plans, the VMAT plans provided lower D2% and better CI/HI for the high-risk PTV (PTV1), and provided bettermore » CI and comparable HI for the low-risk PTV (PTV2). Concerning the OAR sparing, the VMAT plans demonstrated significantly lower Dmax of the spinal cord (planning OAR volume, PRV) and brainstem (PRV), as well as lower Dmean and V30Gy of the right parotid. No significant differences were observed between the two plans concerning the doses delivered to the thyroid, carotid, oral cavity and left parotid. Moreover, the VMAT planning (147 ± 18 min) consumed 213% more time than the IMRT planning (48 ± 10 min). The MUs of the VMAT plans (556 ± 52) were 64% less than those of the IMRT plans (1684 ± 409), and the average delivery time (2.1 ± 0.1 min) was 66% less than that of the IMRT plans (6.3 ± 0.7 min). Conclusion: Compared with the IMRT technique, the VMAT technique can achieve superior target dose distribution and better sparing of the spinal cord, brainstem and right parotid, with less MUs and less delivery time. It is recommended for the radiotherapy of locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma.« less
  • To investigate the dosimetric difference amongst TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with late-stage (Stage III or IV) NPC treated with TomoTherapy or IMRT were selected for the study. Treatment plans with these 3 techniques were devised according to departmental protocol. Dosimetric parameters for organ at risk and treatment targets were compared between TomoTherapy and IMRT, TomoTherapy and RapidArc, and IMRT and RapidArc. Comparison amongst the techniques was done by statistical tests on the dosimetric parameters, total monitor unit (MU), and expected delivery time. All 3 techniques achievedmore » similar target dose coverage. TomoTherapy achieved significantly lower doses in lens and mandible amongst the techniques. It also achieved significantly better dose conformity to the treatment targets. RapidArc achieved significantly lower dose to the eye and normal tissue, lower total MU, and less delivery time. The dosimetric advantages of the 3 techniques were identified in the treatment of late-stage NPC. This may serve as a guideline for selection of the proper technique for different clinical cases.« less
  • Purpose: To quantify the target and normal structures on dose distributing variations during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and to assess the value of replanning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight NPC patients treated with IMRT were recruited. The IMRT was delivered in 33 fractions, to 70 to 76Gy, to the gross tumor volume (GTV). Before the 25th fraction of IMRT, a new simulation computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for all patients. According to the dose constraint criterion in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0225 protocol, the replanning was generated on the new simulation CT. With themore » Quality Assessment Center of a CORVUS 6.3 treatment planning system, a phantom plan was generated for each patient by applying the beam configurations of the initial plan to the anatomy of the new simulation CT. The dose-volume histograms of the phantom plan were compared with the replanning. Results: The percentage of prescription dose delivered to the clinical target volume (CTV1) was significantly increased by 4.91% +- 10.89%, whereas the maximum dose to the spinal cord, mean dose to the left parotid, and V30 to the right parotid were significantly decreased by 5.00 +- 9.23Gy, 4.23 +- 10.03Gy, and 11.47% +- 18.89% respectively in the replanning, compared with the phantom plan (p < 0.05). Based on the dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, 50% of phantom plans (14/28) were out of limit for the dose to the normal critical structures, whereas no plan was out of limit in replanning (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Replanning for patients with NPC before the 25th fraction during IMRT helps to ensure adequate dose to the target volumes and safe doses to critical normal structures.« less