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Title: Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants

Abstract

An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Astronomical Institute Utrecht, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508TA Utrecht (Netherlands)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21255149
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1085; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 4. international meeting on high energy gamma-ray astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany), 7-11 Jul 2008; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3076632; (c) 2009 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ACCELERATION; AMPLIFICATION; COMPRESSION; COSMIC RADIATION; COSMIC X-RAY SOURCES; ELECTRON TEMPERATURE; EQUATIONS; ION TEMPERATURE; MAGNETIC FIELDS; PLASMA; RESOLUTION; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; X RADIATION; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Vink, Jacco. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3076632.
Vink, Jacco. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3076632.
Vink, Jacco. Wed . "Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3076632.
@article{osti_21255149,
title = {Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants},
author = {Vink, Jacco},
abstractNote = {An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3076632},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1085,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 24 00:00:00 EST 2008},
month = {Wed Dec 24 00:00:00 EST 2008}
}
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