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Title: Desiccant outdoor air preconditioners maximize heat recovery ventilation potentials

Abstract

Microorganisms are well protected indoors by the moisture surrounding them if the relative humidity is above 70%. They can cause many acute diseases, infections, and allergies. Humidity also has an effect on air cleanliness and causes the building structure and its contents to deteriorate. Therefore, controlling humidity is a very important factor to human health and comfort and the structural longevity of a building. To date, a great deal of research has been done, and is continuing, in the use of both solid and liquid desiccants. This paper introduces a desiccant-assisted system that combines dehumidification and mechanical refrigeration by means of a desiccant preconditioning module that can serve two or more conventional air-conditioning units. It will be demonstrated that the proposed system, also having indirect evaporative cooling within the preconditioning module, can reduce energy consumption and provide significant cost savings, independent humidity and temperature control, and, therefore, improved indoor air quality and enhanced occupant comfort.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Meckler Group, Encino, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
211855
Report Number(s):
CONF-950624-
Journal ID: ISSN 0001-2505; TRN: IM9617%%171
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), San Diego, CA (United States), 24-28 Jun 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of ASHRAE transactions 1995: Technical and symposium papers. Volume 101, Part 2; PB: 1497 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; SPACE HVAC SYSTEMS; HEAT RECOVERY EQUIPMENT; VENTILATION SYSTEMS; BUILDINGS; ENERGY CONSERVATION

Citation Formats

Meckler, M. Desiccant outdoor air preconditioners maximize heat recovery ventilation potentials. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Meckler, M. Desiccant outdoor air preconditioners maximize heat recovery ventilation potentials. United States.
Meckler, M. Sun . "Desiccant outdoor air preconditioners maximize heat recovery ventilation potentials". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_211855,
title = {Desiccant outdoor air preconditioners maximize heat recovery ventilation potentials},
author = {Meckler, M.},
abstractNote = {Microorganisms are well protected indoors by the moisture surrounding them if the relative humidity is above 70%. They can cause many acute diseases, infections, and allergies. Humidity also has an effect on air cleanliness and causes the building structure and its contents to deteriorate. Therefore, controlling humidity is a very important factor to human health and comfort and the structural longevity of a building. To date, a great deal of research has been done, and is continuing, in the use of both solid and liquid desiccants. This paper introduces a desiccant-assisted system that combines dehumidification and mechanical refrigeration by means of a desiccant preconditioning module that can serve two or more conventional air-conditioning units. It will be demonstrated that the proposed system, also having indirect evaporative cooling within the preconditioning module, can reduce energy consumption and provide significant cost savings, independent humidity and temperature control, and, therefore, improved indoor air quality and enhanced occupant comfort.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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