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Title: Design of Recycle PWR with Heavy Water Moderation

Abstract

This study shows the conceptual plant design of the recycle PWR (RPWR), which is an innovative MOX-PWR with breeding ratios around 1.1 moderated by heavy water. Most of the plant systems of RPWR can employ the systems of PWRs. RPWR has no acid boron systems and has a small tritium removal system. The construction and operation costs are similar to the current PWRs. While, heavy water cost will be decreased drastically with up-to-date producing methods. The reliability for the plant systems of RPWR is high and R and D cost for realizing RPWR is very low because the core design of RPWR is fundamentally based on the current PWR technology. (authors)

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Reactor Core Engineering Department, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 3-1, Minatomirai 3-chome, Nishi-ku, Yokohama, 220-8401 (Japan)
  2. The Japan Atomic Power Company - JAPC (Japan)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Nuclear Society, 555 North Kensington Avenue, La Grange Park, IL 60526 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
21167831
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ICAPP'02: 2002 International congress on advances in nuclear power plants, Hollywood, FL (United States), 9-13 Jun 2002; Other Information: Country of input: France; 5 refs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; BORON; BREEDING RATIO; CONSTRUCTION; COST; DESIGN; HEAVY WATER; OPERATION; PWR TYPE REACTORS; RELIABILITY; REMOVAL; TRITIUM

Citation Formats

Hibi, K., and Uchita, M.. Design of Recycle PWR with Heavy Water Moderation. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Hibi, K., & Uchita, M.. Design of Recycle PWR with Heavy Water Moderation. United States.
Hibi, K., and Uchita, M.. Mon . "Design of Recycle PWR with Heavy Water Moderation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21167831,
title = {Design of Recycle PWR with Heavy Water Moderation},
author = {Hibi, K. and Uchita, M.},
abstractNote = {This study shows the conceptual plant design of the recycle PWR (RPWR), which is an innovative MOX-PWR with breeding ratios around 1.1 moderated by heavy water. Most of the plant systems of RPWR can employ the systems of PWRs. RPWR has no acid boron systems and has a small tritium removal system. The construction and operation costs are similar to the current PWRs. While, heavy water cost will be decreased drastically with up-to-date producing methods. The reliability for the plant systems of RPWR is high and R and D cost for realizing RPWR is very low because the core design of RPWR is fundamentally based on the current PWR technology. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2002},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2002}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • This study presents the conceptual design of the recycle pressurized water reactor (RPWR), which is an innovative PWR fueled with mixed oxide, moderated by heavy water, and having breeding ratios around 1.1. Most of the systems of RPWR can employ those of PWRs. The RPWR has no boric acid systems and has a small tritium removal system. The construction and operation costs would be similar to those of current PWRs. Heavy water cost has decreased drastically with up-to-date producing methods. The reliability of the systems of the RPWR is high, and the research and development cost for RPWR is verymore » low because the core design is fundamentally based on the current PWR technology.« less
  • In order to ensure the sustainable energy supply in Japan, research and developments of reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) have been performed. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as high burn-up, long operation cycle, multiple recycling of plutonium and effective utilization of uranium resources, based on the matured LWR technologies. MOX fuel assemblies in the tight-lattice fuel rod arrangement are used to reduce the moderation of neutron, and hence, to increase the conversion ratio. The conceptual design has been accomplished for the small 330 MWe RMWR core with the discharge burn-up of 60 GWd/t and the operation cycle ofmore » 24 months, under the natural circulation cooling of the core. A breeding ratio of 1.01 and the negative void reactivity coefficient are simultaneously realized in the design. In the plant system design, the passive safety features are intended to be utilized mainly to improve the economy. At present, a hybrid one under the combination of the passive and the active components, and a fully passive one are proposed. The former has been evaluated to reduce the cost for the reactor components. (authors)« less
  • This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis ofmore » reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no visible impacts on neutronic characteristics compared with reference full UOX core. The fuel cycle analysis has shown that {sup 233}U mono-recycling with U{sub 3}ThOX fuel could save 13% of natural uranium resource compared with UOX once through fuel cycle, slightly more than that of Plutonium single-recycling with MOX fuel. If {sup 233}U multi-recycling with U{sub 3}ThOX fuel is implemented, more natural uranium resource would be saved. (authors)« less
  • Water reuse is becoming a critical technology for industrial plants to remain competitive as environmental regulations become more stringent and as municipal water demands increase. The basic challenge of water reuse is to meet the water quality requirements of both the plant effluent and the in-plant processes in an economical fashion. The complex nature of water reuse problems demands a systematic approach for achieving solutions. Such an approach has been developed which integrates the plant audit, numerical process simulation, and pilot-scale experiments to optimize reuse system designs in the sense of both technical and economic merits. Two case studies aremore » presented which illustrate some of the capabilities of this highly flexible approach to water reuse. The case of an oil refinery demonstrates the utility of process modelling prior to pilot-level testing, which is then used to determine system operating parameters and costs. The role of numerical process simulation in predicting process water chemistry and overall economics is emphasized in the case of a copper smelting plant.« less