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Title: Inorganic arsenic exposure affects pain behavior and inflammatory response in rat

Abstract

Inorganic arsenic (iAs) contamination of drinking water is a worldwide problem associated with an increased risk for the development of various types of cancer and noncancerous damage. In vitro studies have suggested that iAs can modulate the activity of macrophages producing an over-expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and resulting in an increase in prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) concentrations in endothelial cells. These effects may lead to an in vivo enhancement of inflammatory and pain responses. Our aim was to determine the effect of a single dose of arsenic or subchronic exposure to arsenic on pain behavior and tissue inflammation in rats. Rats were given a single dose of sodium arsenite (0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg i.p.) or submitted to subchronic exposure to arsenic added to the drinking water for 4 weeks (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppm). Inflammatory pain was assessed by using the formalin and tail-flick tests, while inflammation was evaluated with the carrageenan model. Arsenite did not induce pain or significant inflammation by itself. In contrast, arsenite in both single dose administration and subchronic exposure increased not only the inflammatory process and the underlying hyperalgesic pain, but also induced a decrease in the pain threshold. Alterations in painmore » processing were dependent on the arsenic dose and the length of exposure, and the underlying mechanism involved an increased release of local PGE{sub 2}. These results suggest that inorganic arsenic exposure enhances pain perception and exacerbates the pathological state of inflammatory diseases.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, 78200 Mexico (Mexico)
  2. Seccion Externa de Toxicologia, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico)
  3. Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, 78200 Mexico (Mexico), E-mail: jpurizar@uaslp.mx
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21140871
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 229; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2008.01.029; PII: S0041-008X(08)00059-8; Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARSENIC; CONTAMINATION; DOSES; DRINKING WATER; FORMALDEHYDE; IN VITRO; IN VIVO; INFLAMMATION; MACROPHAGES; NEOPLASMS; PAIN; PROSTAGLANDINS; RATS; SODIUM

Citation Formats

Aguirre-Banuelos, Patricia, Escudero-Lourdes, Claudia, Sanchez-Pena, Luz Carmen, Del Razo, Luz Maria, and Perez-Urizar, Jose. Inorganic arsenic exposure affects pain behavior and inflammatory response in rat. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2008.01.029.
Aguirre-Banuelos, Patricia, Escudero-Lourdes, Claudia, Sanchez-Pena, Luz Carmen, Del Razo, Luz Maria, & Perez-Urizar, Jose. Inorganic arsenic exposure affects pain behavior and inflammatory response in rat. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2008.01.029.
Aguirre-Banuelos, Patricia, Escudero-Lourdes, Claudia, Sanchez-Pena, Luz Carmen, Del Razo, Luz Maria, and Perez-Urizar, Jose. 2008. "Inorganic arsenic exposure affects pain behavior and inflammatory response in rat". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2008.01.029.
@article{osti_21140871,
title = {Inorganic arsenic exposure affects pain behavior and inflammatory response in rat},
author = {Aguirre-Banuelos, Patricia and Escudero-Lourdes, Claudia and Sanchez-Pena, Luz Carmen and Del Razo, Luz Maria and Perez-Urizar, Jose},
abstractNote = {Inorganic arsenic (iAs) contamination of drinking water is a worldwide problem associated with an increased risk for the development of various types of cancer and noncancerous damage. In vitro studies have suggested that iAs can modulate the activity of macrophages producing an over-expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and resulting in an increase in prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) concentrations in endothelial cells. These effects may lead to an in vivo enhancement of inflammatory and pain responses. Our aim was to determine the effect of a single dose of arsenic or subchronic exposure to arsenic on pain behavior and tissue inflammation in rats. Rats were given a single dose of sodium arsenite (0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg i.p.) or submitted to subchronic exposure to arsenic added to the drinking water for 4 weeks (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppm). Inflammatory pain was assessed by using the formalin and tail-flick tests, while inflammation was evaluated with the carrageenan model. Arsenite did not induce pain or significant inflammation by itself. In contrast, arsenite in both single dose administration and subchronic exposure increased not only the inflammatory process and the underlying hyperalgesic pain, but also induced a decrease in the pain threshold. Alterations in pain processing were dependent on the arsenic dose and the length of exposure, and the underlying mechanism involved an increased release of local PGE{sub 2}. These results suggest that inorganic arsenic exposure enhances pain perception and exacerbates the pathological state of inflammatory diseases.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2008.01.029},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 3,
volume = 229,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 6
}
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