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Title: Complications in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Associated with Puncture or Cement Leakage

Abstract

Due to the minimally invasive character and excellent clinical outcome of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), the procedure is being performed in greatly increasing numbers. While PVP has a low complication rate in general, severe complications can occur. We focus on the imaging appearance of complications of PVP associated with puncture or cement leakage-from harmless to life-threatening.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [1]
  1. Klinikum Ernst von Bergmann, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)
  2. HELIOS-Klinikum Berlin, Department of Neurological Surgery (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21091025
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-006-0133-5; Copyright (c) 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; CEMENTS; LEAKS; PVP; SURGERY; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Baumann, Clemens, E-mail: clebaumann@yahoo.com, Fuchs, Heiko, Kiwit, Juergen, Westphalen, Kerstin, and Hierholzer, Johannes. Complications in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Associated with Puncture or Cement Leakage. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0133-5.
Baumann, Clemens, E-mail: clebaumann@yahoo.com, Fuchs, Heiko, Kiwit, Juergen, Westphalen, Kerstin, & Hierholzer, Johannes. Complications in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Associated with Puncture or Cement Leakage. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0133-5.
Baumann, Clemens, E-mail: clebaumann@yahoo.com, Fuchs, Heiko, Kiwit, Juergen, Westphalen, Kerstin, and Hierholzer, Johannes. Sun . "Complications in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Associated with Puncture or Cement Leakage". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0133-5.
@article{osti_21091025,
title = {Complications in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Associated with Puncture or Cement Leakage},
author = {Baumann, Clemens, E-mail: clebaumann@yahoo.com and Fuchs, Heiko and Kiwit, Juergen and Westphalen, Kerstin and Hierholzer, Johannes},
abstractNote = {Due to the minimally invasive character and excellent clinical outcome of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), the procedure is being performed in greatly increasing numbers. While PVP has a low complication rate in general, severe complications can occur. We focus on the imaging appearance of complications of PVP associated with puncture or cement leakage-from harmless to life-threatening.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-006-0133-5},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 2,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of and venous leakage reduction in percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) using a new high-viscosity bone cement (PMMA). PV has been used effectively for pain relief in osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. Cement extrusion is a common problem and can lead to complications. Sixty patients (52 female; mean age, 72.2 {+-} 7.2) suffering from osteoporosis (46), malignancy (12), and angiomas (2), divided into two groups (A and B), underwent PV on 190 vertebrae (86 dorsal, 104 lumbar). In Group A, PV with high-viscosity PMMA (Confidence, Disc-O-Tech, Israel) was used. This PMMA wasmore » injected by a proprietary delivery system, a hydraulic saline-filled screw injector. In Group B, a standard low-viscosity PMMA was used. Postprocedural CT was carried out to detect PMMA leakages and complications. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank test were used to assess significant differences (p < 0.05) in leakages and to evaluate the clinical outcome. PV was feasible, achieving good clinical outcome (p < 0.0001) without major complications. In Group A, postprocedural CT showed an asymptomatic leak in the venous structures of 8 of 98 (8.2%) treated vertebrae; a discoidal leak occurred in 6 of 98 (6.1%). In Group B, a venous leak was seen in 38 of 92 (41.3%) and a discoidal leak in 12 of 92 (13.0%). Reduction of venous leak obtained by high-viscosity PMMA was highly significant (p < 0.0001), whereas this result was not significant (p = 0.14) related to the disc. The high-viscosity PMMA system is safe and effective for clinical use, allowing a significant reduction of extravasation rate and, thus, leakage-related complications.« less
  • Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud,more » France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.« less
  • The objective of this study was to simplify the opacifying mixing process of the bone cement and contrast used for percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP). We performed a biomechanical study of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) (Corinplast{sup TM} 3) using three different mixtures of PMMA, monomer, and contrast: group I, 2:1; group II, 3:2; group III, 3:2:1 ratio of powder/monomer/iodinated contrast (Omnipaque). In vitro biomechanical testing of ultimate compressive strength was carried out in all samples. Following the conclusion of a proper bone cement mixture regimen drawn from the in vitro study, PVP was performed in 125 patients: 58 with cancer, 12 with hemangioma,more » and 54 with osteoporotic fracture. The ultimate compressive strength in group III was decreased by 38% compared to groups II and I. Proper fluoroscopic visualization was achieved in all PVP procedures using this mixture. There were no major complications associated with injection of the cement mixture. Complete (CR) and partial response (PR) was obtained in 64% and 32.8%, respectively. No further vertebral collapse occurred during follow-up. The regimen using iodinated contrast for cement visualization during PVP provides a simple and convenient new method for mixing. Although the biomechanical strength is altered by the contrast medium added, it seems insignificant in clinical practice based on the authors' limited experience.« less
  • Percutaneous vertebroplasty is an accepted treatment for painful vertebral compression fractures caused by osteoporosis and malignant disease. Venous leakage of cement and pulmonary cement embolism have been reported complications. We describe a paravertebral venous cement leak resulting in the deposition of a cement cast in the inferior vena cava and successful retrieval of the cement embolus.
  • Aim of the study was to 'in vivo' measure temperature, during percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), within a vertebral body injected with different bone cements. According to the declaration of Helsinki, 22 women (60-80 years; mean, 75 years) with painful osteoporotic vertebral collapse underwent bilateral transpedicular PV on 22 lumbar vertebrae. Two 10-G vertebroplasty needles were introduced into the vertebra under digital fluoroscopy; a 16-G radiofrequency thermoablation needle (Starburst XL; RITA Medical System Inc., USA), carrying five thermocouples, was than coaxially inserted. Eleven different bone cements were injected and temperatures were measured every 30 s until temperatures dropped under 45{sup o}C. Aftermore » the thermocouple needle was withdrawn, bilateral PV was completed with cement injection through the vertebroplasty needle. Unpaired Student's t-tests, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to evaluate significant differences (p < 0.05) in peak temperatures, variations between cements, and clinical outcome. All procedures were completed without complications, achieving good clinical outcomes (p < 0.0001). Regarding average peak temperature, cements were divided into three groups: A (over 60{sup o}C), B (from 50{sup o} to 60{sup o}C), and C (below 50{sup o}C). Peak temperature in Group A (86.7 {+-} 10.7{sup o}C) was significantly higher (p = 0.0172) than that in Groups B (60.5 {+-} 3.7{sup o}C) and C (44.8 {+-} 2.6{sup o}C). The average of all thermocouples showed an extremely significant difference (p = 0.0002) between groups. None of the tested cements maintained a temperature {>=}45{sup o}C for more than 30 min. These data suggest that back-pain improvement is obtained not by thermal necrosis but by mechanical consolidation only. The relative necrotic thermal effect in vertebral metastases seems to confirm that analgesia must be considered the main intent of PV.« less