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Title: Extensive Iatrogenic Aortic Dissection During Renal Angioplasty: Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent-Graft

Abstract

An extensive iatrogenic aortic type B dissection during percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) for bilateral renal artery stenosis was treated with a covered stent placed in the right renal artery. Control angiography confirmed closure of the entry. Postprocedural CT demonstrated a thick intramural hematoma (IMH) up to the left subclavian artery. CT follow-up at 8 months showed an almost complete resorption of the IMH. While medical treatment is the standard therapy for type B dissections, closure of the intimal tear with a covered stent may be an additional option in extensive cases during PTRA.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. University Hospital of Basel, Interventional Radiology (Switzerland)
  2. University Hospital of Basel, Department of Angiology (Switzerland)
  3. University Hospital of Basel, Interventional Radiology (Switzerland), E-mail: dbilecen@uhbs.ch
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21090970
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-006-0034-7; Copyright (c) 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ARTERIES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; GRAFTS; HEMATOMAS; KIDNEYS; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Rasmus, M., Huegli, R., Jacob, A.L., Aschwanden, M., and Bilecen, D. Extensive Iatrogenic Aortic Dissection During Renal Angioplasty: Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent-Graft. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0034-7.
Rasmus, M., Huegli, R., Jacob, A.L., Aschwanden, M., & Bilecen, D. Extensive Iatrogenic Aortic Dissection During Renal Angioplasty: Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent-Graft. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0034-7.
Rasmus, M., Huegli, R., Jacob, A.L., Aschwanden, M., and Bilecen, D. 2007. "Extensive Iatrogenic Aortic Dissection During Renal Angioplasty: Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent-Graft". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-006-0034-7.
@article{osti_21090970,
title = {Extensive Iatrogenic Aortic Dissection During Renal Angioplasty: Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent-Graft},
author = {Rasmus, M. and Huegli, R. and Jacob, A.L. and Aschwanden, M. and Bilecen, D.},
abstractNote = {An extensive iatrogenic aortic type B dissection during percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) for bilateral renal artery stenosis was treated with a covered stent placed in the right renal artery. Control angiography confirmed closure of the entry. Postprocedural CT demonstrated a thick intramural hematoma (IMH) up to the left subclavian artery. CT follow-up at 8 months showed an almost complete resorption of the IMH. While medical treatment is the standard therapy for type B dissections, closure of the intimal tear with a covered stent may be an additional option in extensive cases during PTRA.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-006-0034-7},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 3,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 6
}
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