skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Predicting Infected Bile Among Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Cholecystostomy

Abstract

Purpose. Patients may not achieve a clinical benefit after percutaneous cholecystostomy due to the inherent difficulty in identifying patients who truly have infected gallbladders. We attempted to identify imaging and biochemical parameters which would help to predict which patients have infected gallbladders. Methods. A retrospective review was performed of 52 patients undergoing percutaneous cholecystostomy for clinical suspicion of acute cholecystitis in whom bile culture results were available. Multiple imaging and biochemical variables were examined alone and in combination as predictors of infected bile, using logistic regression. Results. Of the 52 patients, 25 (48%) had infected bile. Organisms cultured included Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, E. coli, Citrobacter and Candida. No biochemical parameters were significantly predictive of infected bile; white blood cell count >15,000 was weakly associated with greater odds of infected bile (odds ratio 2.0, p = NS). The presence of gallstones, sludge, gallbladder wall thickening and pericholecystic fluid by ultrasound or CT were not predictive of infected bile, alone or in combination, although a trend was observed among patients with CT findings of acute cholecystitis toward a higher 30-day mortality. Radionuclide scans were performed in 31% of patients; all were positive and 66% of these patients had infected bile. Sincemore » no patient who underwent a radionuclide scan had a negative study, this variable could not be entered into the regression model due to collinearity. Conclusion. No single CT or ultrasound imaging variable was predictive of infected bile, and only a weak association of white blood cell count with infected bile was seen. No other biochemical parameters had any association with infected bile. The ability of radionuclide scanning to predict infected bile was higher than that of ultrasound or CT. This study illustrates the continued challenge to identify bacterial cholecystitis among patients referred for percutaneous cholecystostomy.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States), E-mail: clark@rad.upenn.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21088131
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-003-0260-1; Copyright (c) 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.; www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BILE; BILIARY TRACT; BLOOD CELLS; CALCULI; CANDIDA; KLEBSIELLA; MORTALITY; PATIENTS; PSEUDOMONAS; REVIEWS

Citation Formats

Beardsley, Shannon L., Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D., Patel, Aalpen, Freiman, David B., Soulen, Michael C., Stavropoulos, S. William, and Clark, Timothy W.I. Predicting Infected Bile Among Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Cholecystostomy. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-003-0260-1.
Beardsley, Shannon L., Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D., Patel, Aalpen, Freiman, David B., Soulen, Michael C., Stavropoulos, S. William, & Clark, Timothy W.I. Predicting Infected Bile Among Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Cholecystostomy. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-003-0260-1.
Beardsley, Shannon L., Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D., Patel, Aalpen, Freiman, David B., Soulen, Michael C., Stavropoulos, S. William, and Clark, Timothy W.I. 2005. "Predicting Infected Bile Among Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Cholecystostomy". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-003-0260-1.
@article{osti_21088131,
title = {Predicting Infected Bile Among Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Cholecystostomy},
author = {Beardsley, Shannon L. and Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D. and Patel, Aalpen and Freiman, David B. and Soulen, Michael C. and Stavropoulos, S. William and Clark, Timothy W.I.},
abstractNote = {Purpose. Patients may not achieve a clinical benefit after percutaneous cholecystostomy due to the inherent difficulty in identifying patients who truly have infected gallbladders. We attempted to identify imaging and biochemical parameters which would help to predict which patients have infected gallbladders. Methods. A retrospective review was performed of 52 patients undergoing percutaneous cholecystostomy for clinical suspicion of acute cholecystitis in whom bile culture results were available. Multiple imaging and biochemical variables were examined alone and in combination as predictors of infected bile, using logistic regression. Results. Of the 52 patients, 25 (48%) had infected bile. Organisms cultured included Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, E. coli, Citrobacter and Candida. No biochemical parameters were significantly predictive of infected bile; white blood cell count >15,000 was weakly associated with greater odds of infected bile (odds ratio 2.0, p = NS). The presence of gallstones, sludge, gallbladder wall thickening and pericholecystic fluid by ultrasound or CT were not predictive of infected bile, alone or in combination, although a trend was observed among patients with CT findings of acute cholecystitis toward a higher 30-day mortality. Radionuclide scans were performed in 31% of patients; all were positive and 66% of these patients had infected bile. Since no patient who underwent a radionuclide scan had a negative study, this variable could not be entered into the regression model due to collinearity. Conclusion. No single CT or ultrasound imaging variable was predictive of infected bile, and only a weak association of white blood cell count with infected bile was seen. No other biochemical parameters had any association with infected bile. The ability of radionuclide scanning to predict infected bile was higher than that of ultrasound or CT. This study illustrates the continued challenge to identify bacterial cholecystitis among patients referred for percutaneous cholecystostomy.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-003-0260-1},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 3,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = 2005,
month = 4
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate percutaneous cholecystostomy in patients with acute cholecystitis and an increased surgical risk. Methods: Thirty-three patients with acute cholecystitis (calculous, n= 22; acalculous, n= 11) underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy by means of a transhepatic (n= 21) or transperitoneal (n= 12) access route. Clinical and laboratory parameters were retrospectively studied to determine the benefit from cholecystostomy. Results: All procedures were technically successful. Twenty-two (67%) patients improved clinically within 48 hr; showing a significant decrease in body temperature (n= 13), normalization of the white blood cell count (n= 3), or both (n= 6). There were 6 (18%) minor/moderate complications (transhepatic access,more » n= 3; transperitoneal access, n= 3). Further treatment for patients with calculous cholecystitis was cholecystectomy (n= 9) and percutaneous and endoscopic stone removal (n= 8). Further treatment for patients with acalculous cholecystitis was cholecystectomy (n= 2) and gallbladder ablation (n= 2). There were 4 deaths (12%) either in hospital or within 30 days of drainage; none of the deaths was procedure-related. Conclusions: Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a safe and effective procedure for patients with acute cholecystitis. For most patients with acalculous cholecystitis percutaneous cholecystostomy may be considered a definitive therapy. In calculous disease this treatment is often only temporizing and a definitive surgical, endoscopic, or radiologic treatment becomes necessary.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this article was to share midterm results of percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) as a first-line therapy in chronic hemodialysis patients with acute cholecystitis. Methods: Fourteen chronic hemodialysis patients with acute cholecystitis underwent PC between March 2007 and May 2009 at our institute. On preoperative assessment, the patients were classified into the ASA score by the anesthesiology team. All patients were class IV because of severe underlying comorbidities. The patients were referred to interventional radiology unit for PC by consensus of the multidisciplinary team. Results: The PC was technically successful in all the patients without minor or majormore » complications related to the procedure. Clinical symptoms in three patients who presented with sepsis and multiorgan failure did not resolve after PC, and these patients died following urgent surgery, including open cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration. A new cholecystitis attack was detected in one patient in the acalculous group at the sixth month of the follow-up period. The mean catheterization time was 31.7 (range, 28-41) days. The mean follow-up time was 13.3 (range 4-21) months. Conclusions: The PC may come into consideration as a first-line treatment modality in the management of acute cholecystitis in poor surgical candidate chronic hemodialysis patients. This is the first report focusing on the midterm results of PC as a first-line therapy in hemodialysis patients with acute cholecystitis who could be operated on.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Purpose: To analyze the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for patients with distal common bile duct (CBD) cancer who underwent curative surgery, and to identify the prognostic factors for these patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 1991 and December 2002, 38 patients with adenocarcinoma of the distal CBD underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. There were 27 men and 11 women, and the median age was 60 years (range, 34-73). Adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered to the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes up to 40 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction with a 2-week planned rest. Intravenous 5-fluorouracil (500mg/m{sup 2}/day) was givenmore » on day 1 to day 3 of each split course. The median follow-up period was 39 months. Results: The 5-year overall survival rate of all patients was 49.1%. On univariate analysis, only histologic differentiation (p = 0.0005) was associated with overall survival. Tumor size ({<=}2cm vs. >2cm) had a marginally significant impact on the treatment outcome (p = 0.0624). However, there was no difference in overall survival rates between T3 and T4 tumors (p = 0.6189), for which the main determinants were pancreatic and duodenal invasion, respectively. On multivariate analysis, histologic differentiation (p = 0.0092) and tumor size (p = 0.0046) were independent risk factors for overall survival. Conclusions: Long-term survival can be expected in patients with distal CBD cancer undergoing curative surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Histologic differentiation and tumor size were significant prognostic factors predicting overall survival, whereas duodenal invasion was not. This finding suggests the need for further refinement in tumor staging.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze the prognostic factors predicting distant metastasis in patients undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation for extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1995 and August 2006, 166 patients with EHBD cancer underwent resection with curative intent, followed by adjuvant chemoradiation. There were 120 males and 46 females, and median age was 61 years (range, 34-86). Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered to tumor bed and regional lymph nodes (median dose, 40 Gy; range, 34-56 Gy). A total of 157 patients also received fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer, and fluoropyrimidine-based maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 127 patients. Median follow-up durationmore » was 29 months. Results: The treatment failed for 97 patients, and the major pattern of failure was distant metastasis (76 patients, 78.4%). The 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate was 49.4%. The most common site of distant failure was the liver (n = 36). On multivariate analysis, hilar tumor, tumor size {>=}2 cm, involved lymph node, and poorly differentiated tumor were associated with inferior distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.0348, 0.0754, 0.0009, and 0.0078, respectively), whereas T stage was not (p = 0.8081). When patients were divided into four groups based on these risk factors, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates for patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 risk factors were 86.4%, 59.9%, 32.5%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Despite maintenance chemotherapy, distant metastasis was the major pattern of failure in patients undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation for EHBD cancer after resection with curative intent. Intensified chemotherapy is warranted to improve the treatment outcome, especially in those with multiple risk factors.« less