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Title: Warm forming simulation of titanium tailor-welded blanks with experimental verification

Abstract

The simulation of the forming process of Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures using finite element analysis to determine the optimum forming conditions of Ti-TWBs is presented in this paper. For verification of the simulation results, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was selected for the first instance to prepare the specimen of Ti-TWBs. The thickness combinations of 0.7mm/1.0mm and in widths of 20mm, 90mm and 110mm were used. A specific tooling system with temperature control device was developed to the forming of Ti-TWBs at 550 deg. C. A cylindrical punch of 50mm diameter was designed and manufactured. Different forming parameters (i.e. traveling distance of the punch and the stroke as well as the time of each forming process) and material characteristics under various temperatures were measured. In addition, the true stress and strain values by tensile test as well as the major and minor strain distributions of forming Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures by Swift Forming test were carried out and applied as input into the finite element program. The simulation results indentify failure locations and Limit Dome Height (LDH) of Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures and were compared with the measured ones. Finally, the optimum forming conditions of Ti-TWBs were determined based on the experimentallymore » verified simulation results.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)
  2. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn, 4901, Evergreen Road, Dearborn, Michigan (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21057382
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 908; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: NUMIFORM '07: 9. international conference on numerical methods in industrial forming processes, Porto (Portugal), 17-21 Jun 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2741041; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CYLINDRICAL CONFIGURATION; DISTRIBUTION; FAILURES; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; MATERIALS WORKING; STRAINS; STRESSES; TEMPERATURE CONTROL; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TESTING; TITANIUM; TITANIUM ALLOYS

Citation Formats

Lai, C. P., Chan, L. C., and Chow, C. L. Warm forming simulation of titanium tailor-welded blanks with experimental verification. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2741041.
Lai, C. P., Chan, L. C., & Chow, C. L. Warm forming simulation of titanium tailor-welded blanks with experimental verification. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2741041.
Lai, C. P., Chan, L. C., and Chow, C. L. Thu . "Warm forming simulation of titanium tailor-welded blanks with experimental verification". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2741041.
@article{osti_21057382,
title = {Warm forming simulation of titanium tailor-welded blanks with experimental verification},
author = {Lai, C. P. and Chan, L. C. and Chow, C. L.},
abstractNote = {The simulation of the forming process of Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures using finite element analysis to determine the optimum forming conditions of Ti-TWBs is presented in this paper. For verification of the simulation results, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was selected for the first instance to prepare the specimen of Ti-TWBs. The thickness combinations of 0.7mm/1.0mm and in widths of 20mm, 90mm and 110mm were used. A specific tooling system with temperature control device was developed to the forming of Ti-TWBs at 550 deg. C. A cylindrical punch of 50mm diameter was designed and manufactured. Different forming parameters (i.e. traveling distance of the punch and the stroke as well as the time of each forming process) and material characteristics under various temperatures were measured. In addition, the true stress and strain values by tensile test as well as the major and minor strain distributions of forming Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures by Swift Forming test were carried out and applied as input into the finite element program. The simulation results indentify failure locations and Limit Dome Height (LDH) of Ti-TWBs at elevated temperatures and were compared with the measured ones. Finally, the optimum forming conditions of Ti-TWBs were determined based on the experimentally verified simulation results.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2741041},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 908,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Use of laser welded blanks of multiple sheets of material which are referred to as Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) is one of the current interests for automotive industries as it reduces manufacturing cost, weight of the vehicle and also improves the quality of the component. As the varieties of TWB applications are increasing, the effects of the difference in material properties, surface properties, weld and its orientation on blank formability have become important both in deep-drawing and stretch forming. In this work, formability of two types of TWBs has been studied experimentally by performing out-of-plane stretch forming tests using amore » 101.6 mm diameter hemispherical punch. The materials used in this study were Interstitial-Free (IF) steel sheet samples of different thickness (1.0mm and 1.5 mm) and samples of same thickness (1.5 mm) but with different surface characteristics (galvanized and ungalvanized). In the stretch forming experiments, the limiting dome height (LDH) and strain distribution were measured. The influence of weld orientation with respect to major surface strain on formability was studied by conducting experiments in or close to plane strain condition. It has been found that thickness ratio and difference in properties have significant influence on major and minor strain distributions and weld line movement, but the difference in surface characteristics has a minor effect. The simulations results agreed well with the observations from the experimental work conducted on stretch forming of TWBs.« less
  • Beginning in 1992, tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) were used in the US automotive industry to consolidate parts, reduce tolerances, save weight, and increase stiffness. This business is expanding rapidly; more than $500 million of annual TWB sales are expected by 1997. Welds in steel are generally stronger than the base material, such that weld failure by preferential localization is not a critical issue. However, the forming characteristics of TWBs must be understood in order to design and produce high-quality parts with reasonable production and tooling costs. Three formability issues were addressed in this study: the intrinsic ductility and relative formability ofmore » three weld types (CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG laser welds and mash-seam welds with and without mechanical postweld processing); the value and correspondence of mechanical tests to each other and to press performance; and the prediction of the forming behavior using the finite element method (FEM). Two failure modes for TWBs were identified. While the local ductility of welds can differ greatly, little difference in press formability was measured among the weld types. More important than weld ductility are the changed deformation patterns which depend on the differential strength but depend little on local weld properties. Finite element method (FEM) simulations of dome tests and scale fender-forming operations show good agreement with measurements, as long as boundary conditions are known accurately. The importance of weld-line displacement is discussed and several simulations are compared with experiments.« less
  • A Tailor welded blank (TWB) consists of sheet materials of different thicknesses or different alloy compositions that are welded together prior to forming. The weaker of the two sheets deforms more causing weld line movement. This paper proposes methods to predict optimum position of the weld line in a flat tailor welded blank so as to reduce weld line movement in formed tailor welded blanks. Two simulation based methods - back propagation and contour of minimum strain are studied to reduce weld line movement. These methods are based on blank shape modification.
  • A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.
  • Current joining technologies for automotive aluminum alloys are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translatemore » to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum welded components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability utilizing a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.« less