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Title: X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues

Abstract

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 114 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 4R5 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054619
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 882; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: XAFS13: 13. international conference on X-ray absorption fine structure, Stanford, CA (United States), 9-14 Jul 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2644509; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; CHEMICAL STATE; DISTRIBUTION; FLUORESCENCE; IMAGES; IN VIVO; METALS; SEMIMETALS; SENSITIVITY; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Pickering, Ingrid J., and George, Graham N.. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2644509.
Pickering, Ingrid J., & George, Graham N.. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644509.
Pickering, Ingrid J., and George, Graham N.. Fri . "X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644509.
@article{osti_21054619,
title = {X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues},
author = {Pickering, Ingrid J. and George, Graham N.},
abstractNote = {X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2644509},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 882,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}