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Title: X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues

Abstract

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 114 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 4R5 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054619
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 882; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: XAFS13: 13. international conference on X-ray absorption fine structure, Stanford, CA (United States), 9-14 Jul 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2644509; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; CHEMICAL STATE; DISTRIBUTION; FLUORESCENCE; IMAGES; IN VIVO; METALS; SEMIMETALS; SENSITIVITY; X-RAY SPECTRA; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Pickering, Ingrid J., and George, Graham N. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2644509.
Pickering, Ingrid J., & George, Graham N. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644509.
Pickering, Ingrid J., and George, Graham N. Fri . "X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2644509.
@article{osti_21054619,
title = {X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues},
author = {Pickering, Ingrid J. and George, Graham N.},
abstractNote = {X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2644509},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 882,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, usingmore » these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.« less
  • Manganese (Mn) is not abundant in human brain tissue, but it is recognized as a neurotoxin. The symptoms of manganese intoxication are similar to Parkinson's disease (PD), but the link between environmental, occupational or dietary Mn exposure and PD in humans is not well established. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and in particular X-ray fluorescence can provide precise information on the distribution, concentration and chemical form of metals. However the scattered radiation and fluorescence from the adjacent abundant element, iron (Fe), may interfere with and limit the ability to detect ultra-dilute Mn. A bent Laue analyzer based Mn fluorescence detection systemmore » has been designed and fabricated to improve elemental specificity in XAS imaging. This bent Laue analyzer of logarithmic spiral shape placed upstream of an energy discriminating detector should improve the energy resolution from hundreds of eV to several eV. The bent Laue detection system was validated by imaging Mn fluorescence from Mn foils, gelatin calibration samples and adult Drosophila at the Hard X-ray MicroAnalysis (HXMA) beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). Optimization of the design parameters, fabrication procedures and preliminary experimental results are presented along with future plans.« less
  • The fate and chemical speciation of arsenic (As) uptake, translocation and storage by the As hyperaccumulating fern Pityogramma calomelanos var. austroamericana (Pteridaceae) were examined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and synchrotron-based {mu}-X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) and {mu}-X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) spectroscopies. Chemical analysis revealed total As concentration was ca. 6.5 times greater in young fronds (5845 mg kg {sup -1} dry weight) than in old frons (903 mg kg {sup -1} DW) pinnae, As concentration decreased from the base (6822 mg kg {sup -1} DW) to the apex (4301 mg kg {sup -1}DW) of the fronds. Themore » results from {mu}-XANES and {mu}-XRF of living tissues suggested that more than 60% of arsenate (As{sup v}) absorbed was reduced to arsenite (As{sup III}) in roots, prior to transport through vascular tissues as As{sup v} and As{sup III}. In pinnules, As{sup III} was the predominate redox species (72-90%), presumably as solvated, oxygen coordinated compounds. The presence of putative As{sup III}-sulphide (S{sup -2}) coordinationthroughout the fern tissues (4-25%) suggests that S{sup 2-} functional groups may contribute in the biochemical reduction of As{sup v} to As{sup III} during uptake and transport at a whole plant level. Organic arsenicals and thiol-rich compounds were not detected in the species and are unlikely to play a role in As hyperaccumulation in this fern. The study provides important insights into homeostatic regulation of As following As uptake in P. calomelanos var. austroamericana.« less