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Title: High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

Abstract

Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - evenmore » inside solid materials.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. University of Trento, 38050 POVO (Italy)
  2. Transportation Sciences Corporation and GRAVWAVE LLC, 8123 Tuscany Avenue, Playa del Rey, California 90293 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21054532
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 880; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: International forum-STAIF 2007: 11. conference on thermophysics applications in microgravity; 24. symposium on space nuclear power and propulsion; 5. conference on human/robotic technology and the vision for space exploration; 5. symposium on space colonization; 4. symposium on new frontiers and future concepts, Albuquerque, NM (United States), 11-15 Feb 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2437562; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ATOMIC NUMBER; EFFICIENCY; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; MASS; NUCLEAR STRUCTURE; NUCLEI; SOLIDS; THERMONUCLEAR FUELS; THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS

Citation Formats

Fontana, Giorgio, and Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2437562.
Fontana, Giorgio, & Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2437562.
Fontana, Giorgio, and Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.. Tue . "High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2437562.
@article{osti_21054532,
title = {High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion},
author = {Fontana, Giorgio and Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.},
abstractNote = {Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2437562},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 880,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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