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Title: Adaptation of a Commercial Optical CMOS Image Sensor for Direct-Detection Fast X-ray Imaging

Abstract

We have adapted a commercial CMOS optical image sensor for use as a fast x-ray detector. The sensor was used in a mode where the x-rays impinge directly on the sensor. Area detectors can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio of acquired data in the low photon count rate situations (even at 3rd generation synchrotron sources) encountered in both small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments,. CCD area detectors have been used for these types of experiments, but the relatively slow readout times typical of CCDs limit their use for studying the dynamics and kinetics of many samples. We characterized the performance of a CMOS optical detector for use in XPCS experiments.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States)
  2. Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21049231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 879; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9. international conference on synchrotron radiation instrumentation, Daegu (Korea, Republic of), 28 May - 2 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2436273; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; CORRELATIONS; COUNTING RATES; IMAGES; PERFORMANCE; PHOTONS; RADIATION DETECTORS; READOUT SYSTEMS; SENSORS; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO; SMALL ANGLE SCATTERING; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES; X RADIATION; X-RAY DETECTION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Marschand, Lyle W., Kubik, Donna, Lurio, Laurence B., Jiao Xuesong, Sprung, Michael, Tieman, Brian, and Sandy, Alec R. Adaptation of a Commercial Optical CMOS Image Sensor for Direct-Detection Fast X-ray Imaging. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2436273.
Marschand, Lyle W., Kubik, Donna, Lurio, Laurence B., Jiao Xuesong, Sprung, Michael, Tieman, Brian, & Sandy, Alec R. Adaptation of a Commercial Optical CMOS Image Sensor for Direct-Detection Fast X-ray Imaging. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436273.
Marschand, Lyle W., Kubik, Donna, Lurio, Laurence B., Jiao Xuesong, Sprung, Michael, Tieman, Brian, and Sandy, Alec R. Fri . "Adaptation of a Commercial Optical CMOS Image Sensor for Direct-Detection Fast X-ray Imaging". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2436273.
@article{osti_21049231,
title = {Adaptation of a Commercial Optical CMOS Image Sensor for Direct-Detection Fast X-ray Imaging},
author = {Marschand, Lyle W. and Kubik, Donna and Lurio, Laurence B. and Jiao Xuesong and Sprung, Michael and Tieman, Brian and Sandy, Alec R.},
abstractNote = {We have adapted a commercial CMOS optical image sensor for use as a fast x-ray detector. The sensor was used in a mode where the x-rays impinge directly on the sensor. Area detectors can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio of acquired data in the low photon count rate situations (even at 3rd generation synchrotron sources) encountered in both small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments,. CCD area detectors have been used for these types of experiments, but the relatively slow readout times typical of CCDs limit their use for studying the dynamics and kinetics of many samples. We characterized the performance of a CMOS optical detector for use in XPCS experiments.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2436273},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 879,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • We have adapted a commercial CMOS optical image sensor for use as a fast x-ray detector. The sensor was used in a mode where the x-rays impinge directly on the sensor. Area detectors can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio of acquired data in the low photon count rate situations (even at 3rd generation synchrotron sources) encountered in both small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments. CCD area detectors have been used for these types of experiments, but the relatively slow readout times typical of CCDs limit their use for studying the dynamics and kinetics ofmore » many samples. We characterized the performance of a CMOS optical detector for use in XPCS experiments.« less
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