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Title: Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector

Abstract

A hybrid hydrogen-carbon (H{sub 2}CAR) process for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels is proposed wherein biomass is the carbon source and hydrogen is supplied from carbon-free energy. To implement this concept, a process has been designed to co-feed a biomass gasifier with H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} recycled from the H{sub 2}-CO to liquid conversion reactor. Modeling of this biomass to liquids process has identified several major advantages of the H{sub 2}CAR process. The land area needed to grow the biomass is <40% of that needed by other routes that solely use biomass to support the entire transportation sector. Whereras the literature estimates known processes to be able to produce {approx}30% of the United States transportation fuel from the annual biomass of 1.366 billion tons, the H{sub 2}CAR process shows the potential to supply the entire United States transportation sector from that quantity of biomass. The synthesized liquid provides H{sub 2} storage in an open loop system. Reduction to practice of the H{sub 2}CAR route has the potential to provide the transportation sector for the foreseeable future, using the existing infrastructure. The rationale of using H{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}CAR process is explained by the significantly higher annualizedmore » average solar energy conversion efficiency for hydrogen generation versus that for biomass growth. For coal to liquids, the advantage of H{sub 2}CAR is that there is no additional CO{sub 2} release to the atmosphere due to the replacement of petroleum with coal, thus eliminating the need to sequester CO{sub 2}.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering and Energy Center at Discovery Park
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21021713
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: doi: www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.0609921104
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; 08 HYDROGEN; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; AVAILABILITY; BIOMASS; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; CARBON SOURCES; COAL; EFFICIENCY; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN; PETROLEUM; PRODUCTION; SIMULATION; SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION; STORAGE; TRANSPORTATION SECTOR

Citation Formats

Agrawal, R., Singh, N.R., Ribeiro, F.H., and Delgass, W.N. Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.0609921104.
Agrawal, R., Singh, N.R., Ribeiro, F.H., & Delgass, W.N. Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.0609921104.
Agrawal, R., Singh, N.R., Ribeiro, F.H., and Delgass, W.N. Tue . "Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.0609921104.
@article{osti_21021713,
title = {Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector},
author = {Agrawal, R. and Singh, N.R. and Ribeiro, F.H. and Delgass, W.N.},
abstractNote = {A hybrid hydrogen-carbon (H{sub 2}CAR) process for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels is proposed wherein biomass is the carbon source and hydrogen is supplied from carbon-free energy. To implement this concept, a process has been designed to co-feed a biomass gasifier with H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} recycled from the H{sub 2}-CO to liquid conversion reactor. Modeling of this biomass to liquids process has identified several major advantages of the H{sub 2}CAR process. The land area needed to grow the biomass is <40% of that needed by other routes that solely use biomass to support the entire transportation sector. Whereras the literature estimates known processes to be able to produce {approx}30% of the United States transportation fuel from the annual biomass of 1.366 billion tons, the H{sub 2}CAR process shows the potential to supply the entire United States transportation sector from that quantity of biomass. The synthesized liquid provides H{sub 2} storage in an open loop system. Reduction to practice of the H{sub 2}CAR route has the potential to provide the transportation sector for the foreseeable future, using the existing infrastructure. The rationale of using H{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}CAR process is explained by the significantly higher annualized average solar energy conversion efficiency for hydrogen generation versus that for biomass growth. For coal to liquids, the advantage of H{sub 2}CAR is that there is no additional CO{sub 2} release to the atmosphere due to the replacement of petroleum with coal, thus eliminating the need to sequester CO{sub 2}.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.0609921104},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 12,
volume = 104,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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