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Title: Stability and debris in high-brightness liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus x-ray sources

Abstract

We investigate the x-ray spot stability and the debris emission in liquid-metal-jet anode electron-impact x-ray sources operating in the 10-100 W microfocus regime. The x-ray spot size is 15-23 {mu}m in diameter and the electron-beam power density is up to {approx}210 kW/mm{sup 2}, an order of magnitude higher than for conventional microfocus sources. In the power range of the investigation the source is stable in terms of spot size and position. The debris emission rate increases exponentially with the applied electron-beam power but may be reduced by combining larger and faster target jets with smaller e-beam foci and by mitigation schemes. It is concluded that the investigated factors will not limit the performance and function of liquid-metal-jet-anode electron-impact microfocus sources when operating in this high-brightness regime.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Biomedical and X-ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology/Albanova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20982655
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2423229; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ANODES; BEAM-PLASMA SYSTEMS; BRIGHTNESS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; EMISSION; LIQUID METALS; MITIGATION; PLASMA; PLASMA FOCUS; PLASMA INSTABILITY; PLASMA JETS; POWER DENSITY; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Otendal, M., Tuohimaa, T., and Hertz, H. M. Stability and debris in high-brightness liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus x-ray sources. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2423229.
Otendal, M., Tuohimaa, T., & Hertz, H. M. Stability and debris in high-brightness liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus x-ray sources. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2423229.
Otendal, M., Tuohimaa, T., and Hertz, H. M. Mon . "Stability and debris in high-brightness liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus x-ray sources". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2423229.
@article{osti_20982655,
title = {Stability and debris in high-brightness liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus x-ray sources},
author = {Otendal, M. and Tuohimaa, T. and Hertz, H. M.},
abstractNote = {We investigate the x-ray spot stability and the debris emission in liquid-metal-jet anode electron-impact x-ray sources operating in the 10-100 W microfocus regime. The x-ray spot size is 15-23 {mu}m in diameter and the electron-beam power density is up to {approx}210 kW/mm{sup 2}, an order of magnitude higher than for conventional microfocus sources. In the power range of the investigation the source is stable in terms of spot size and position. The debris emission rate increases exponentially with the applied electron-beam power but may be reduced by combining larger and faster target jets with smaller e-beam foci and by mitigation schemes. It is concluded that the investigated factors will not limit the performance and function of liquid-metal-jet-anode electron-impact microfocus sources when operating in this high-brightness regime.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2423229},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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  • In 2007, we began to explore alternative x-ray sources for application to refraction-enhanced (phase contrast) x-ray radiography of cryogenic NIF ignition capsules containing frozen deuterium-tritium (D-T) ice layers. These radiographs are currently obtained using Kevex microfocus tubes as backlights, and for these sources the x-ray source size is approximately 5 {micro}m. As part of this exploration, we obtained refraction-enhanced radiographs of empty plastic capsules using the Janus laser facility at LLNL, demonstrating that even large ({approx} 100 {micro}m) sources can be utilized in refraction-enhanced radiography provided the source/sample distance is sufficiently large, and provided the final x-ray detector has sufficientmore » spatial resolution. Essentially, in the current geometry, we rely on a small source to provide spatial resolution and on the source/sample distance to provide refraction contrast, but an equally useful alternative geometry is to use a large source and rely on fine detector spatial resolution to provide spatial resolution and on the sample/detector distance to provide refraction contrast.« less
  • Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modifiedmore » to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in line with those reported for other models for radiology or mammography. Conclusions: A new version of the TASMIP model for the estimation of x-ray spectra in microfocus x-ray sources has been developed and validated experimentally. Similarly to other versions of TASMIP, the estimation of spectra is very simple, involving only the evaluation of polynomial expressions.« less