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Title: Mass fractionation of carbon and hydrogen secondary ions upon Cs{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} bombardment of organic materials

Abstract

A phenomenon known as mass fractionation has been probed in organic materials using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Mass fractionation occurs because two isotopes of a particular species (i.e., identical number of protons, but different number of neutrons) do not have identical secondary ion yields in a constant chemical environment. Two primary ion probes, Cs{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +}, have been utilized with detection of negative and positive secondary ions, respectively, using a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. These two analysis conditions have been found to yield considerably different mass fractionation effects as a result of different sputtering and ionization mechanisms. Also, as determined previously with SIMS analysis of inorganic materials, the lower molecular weight species carbon and hydrogen are particularly susceptible to mass fractionation effects. Because organic materials are primarily composed of carbon and hydrogen, and because isotopic labeling is often utilized to accurately analyze such materials, knowledge of these effects in organic materials is essential for quantitative SIMS analysis.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20979367
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, International Journal Devoted to Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1116/1.2718957; (c) 2007 American Vacuum Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CARBON; CESIUM IONS; FRACTIONATION; HYDROGEN; ION BEAMS; ION MICROPROBE ANALYSIS; ION PROBES; IONIZATION; MASS; MASS SPECTRA; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; MOLECULAR WEIGHT; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC MATTER; OXYGEN IONS; SPUTTERING

Citation Formats

Harton, Shane E., Zhu Zhengmao, Stevie, Frederick A., Griffis, Dieter P., Ade, Harald, Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 and Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, and Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695. Mass fractionation of carbon and hydrogen secondary ions upon Cs{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} bombardment of organic materials. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1116/1.2718957.
Harton, Shane E., Zhu Zhengmao, Stevie, Frederick A., Griffis, Dieter P., Ade, Harald, Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 and Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, & Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695. Mass fractionation of carbon and hydrogen secondary ions upon Cs{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} bombardment of organic materials. United States. doi:10.1116/1.2718957.
Harton, Shane E., Zhu Zhengmao, Stevie, Frederick A., Griffis, Dieter P., Ade, Harald, Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 and Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, and Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695. Tue . "Mass fractionation of carbon and hydrogen secondary ions upon Cs{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} bombardment of organic materials". United States. doi:10.1116/1.2718957.
@article{osti_20979367,
title = {Mass fractionation of carbon and hydrogen secondary ions upon Cs{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} bombardment of organic materials},
author = {Harton, Shane E. and Zhu Zhengmao and Stevie, Frederick A. and Griffis, Dieter P. and Ade, Harald and Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 and Analytical Instrumentation Facility, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 and Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695},
abstractNote = {A phenomenon known as mass fractionation has been probed in organic materials using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Mass fractionation occurs because two isotopes of a particular species (i.e., identical number of protons, but different number of neutrons) do not have identical secondary ion yields in a constant chemical environment. Two primary ion probes, Cs{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +}, have been utilized with detection of negative and positive secondary ions, respectively, using a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. These two analysis conditions have been found to yield considerably different mass fractionation effects as a result of different sputtering and ionization mechanisms. Also, as determined previously with SIMS analysis of inorganic materials, the lower molecular weight species carbon and hydrogen are particularly susceptible to mass fractionation effects. Because organic materials are primarily composed of carbon and hydrogen, and because isotopic labeling is often utilized to accurately analyze such materials, knowledge of these effects in organic materials is essential for quantitative SIMS analysis.},
doi = {10.1116/1.2718957},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, International Journal Devoted to Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films},
number = 3,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}