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Title: X-ray diffraction profiling of metal-metal interfaces at the nanoscale

Abstract

Several samples containing interfaces between dissimilar metals were examined using diffraction of synchrotron radiation. The complex refractive index profile in the vicinity of the interface for each sample was reconstructed with spatial resolution of about 40 nm by the phase retrieval x-ray diffractometry technique. A series of computer simulations related to the analysis of various configurations of interfaces between dissimilar materials were performed. A practical algorithm of experimental data collection for a detailed examination of internal interfaces was suggested. An estimation of the minimal size of the interface structure modulations, which can be analyzed by the phase retrieval x-ray diffractometry technique, was suggested from the results of computer simulations. It was shown that interface modulations of about 50-100 nm in bimetals can be readily reconstructed by the technique.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)
  2. (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976703
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.075416; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ALGORITHMS; BIMETALS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; INTERFACES; NANOSTRUCTURES; REFRACTIVE INDEX; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Darahanau, A. V., Nikulin, A. Y., Dilanian, R. A., Muddle, B. C., and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800. X-ray diffraction profiling of metal-metal interfaces at the nanoscale. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.075416.
Darahanau, A. V., Nikulin, A. Y., Dilanian, R. A., Muddle, B. C., & Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800. X-ray diffraction profiling of metal-metal interfaces at the nanoscale. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.075416.
Darahanau, A. V., Nikulin, A. Y., Dilanian, R. A., Muddle, B. C., and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800. Thu . "X-ray diffraction profiling of metal-metal interfaces at the nanoscale". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.075416.
@article{osti_20976703,
title = {X-ray diffraction profiling of metal-metal interfaces at the nanoscale},
author = {Darahanau, A. V. and Nikulin, A. Y. and Dilanian, R. A. and Muddle, B. C. and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800},
abstractNote = {Several samples containing interfaces between dissimilar metals were examined using diffraction of synchrotron radiation. The complex refractive index profile in the vicinity of the interface for each sample was reconstructed with spatial resolution of about 40 nm by the phase retrieval x-ray diffractometry technique. A series of computer simulations related to the analysis of various configurations of interfaces between dissimilar materials were performed. A practical algorithm of experimental data collection for a detailed examination of internal interfaces was suggested. An estimation of the minimal size of the interface structure modulations, which can be analyzed by the phase retrieval x-ray diffractometry technique, was suggested from the results of computer simulations. It was shown that interface modulations of about 50-100 nm in bimetals can be readily reconstructed by the technique.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.075416},
journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 7,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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