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Title: Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses

Abstract

Motivated by recent experiments on metallic glasses, we examine the micromechanisms of strain accommodation including crystallization and void formation during inelastic deformation of glasses by employing molecular statics simulations. Our atomistic simulations with Lennard-Jones-like potentials suggests that a softer short range interaction between atoms favors crystallization. Compressive hydrostatic strain in the presence of a shear strain promotes crystallization whereas a tensile hydrostatic strain is found to induce voids. The deformation subsequent to the onset of crystallization includes partial reamorphization and recrystallization, suggesting important atomistic mechanisms of plastic dissipation in glasses.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)
  2. Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)
  3. (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20976649
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.024203; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AMORPHOUS STATE; CRYSTALLIZATION; DEFORMATION; GLASS; INTERACTION RANGE; LENNARD-JONES POTENTIAL; METALLIC GLASSES; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; PLASTICITY; RECRYSTALLIZATION; SIMULATION; STRAINS; STRESSES

Citation Formats

Murali, P., Ramamurty, U., Shenoy, Vijay B., and Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012. Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.024203.
Murali, P., Ramamurty, U., Shenoy, Vijay B., & Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012. Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.024203.
Murali, P., Ramamurty, U., Shenoy, Vijay B., and Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012. Mon . "Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.024203.
@article{osti_20976649,
title = {Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses},
author = {Murali, P. and Ramamurty, U. and Shenoy, Vijay B. and Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012},
abstractNote = {Motivated by recent experiments on metallic glasses, we examine the micromechanisms of strain accommodation including crystallization and void formation during inelastic deformation of glasses by employing molecular statics simulations. Our atomistic simulations with Lennard-Jones-like potentials suggests that a softer short range interaction between atoms favors crystallization. Compressive hydrostatic strain in the presence of a shear strain promotes crystallization whereas a tensile hydrostatic strain is found to induce voids. The deformation subsequent to the onset of crystallization includes partial reamorphization and recrystallization, suggesting important atomistic mechanisms of plastic dissipation in glasses.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.75.024203},
journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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