skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet

Abstract

As a direct write technology, the electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet is introduced. In this letter, two categorized types of examples of two-dimensional patterning were printed by using the electrohydrodynamic printing method. A spiral-type inductor was printed to demonstrate the feasibility of the electrohydrodynamic printing as a fabrication process. The printed spiral inductor produced 9.45 {mu}H and exhibited approximately five times larger resistivity (9.5 {mu}{omega} cm) than that of bulk silver after the sintering process. Then, complex geometries having square- and round-shape patterns were also printed.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971840
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2645078; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; ELECTROHYDRODYNAMICS; NANOSTRUCTURES; PARTICLES; SILVER; SINTERING; SOLENOIDS

Citation Formats

Lee, Dae-Young, Shin, Yun-Soo, Park, Sung-Eun, Yu, Tae-U, and Hwang, Jungho. Electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2645078.
Lee, Dae-Young, Shin, Yun-Soo, Park, Sung-Eun, Yu, Tae-U, & Hwang, Jungho. Electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2645078.
Lee, Dae-Young, Shin, Yun-Soo, Park, Sung-Eun, Yu, Tae-U, and Hwang, Jungho. Mon . "Electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2645078.
@article{osti_20971840,
title = {Electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet},
author = {Lee, Dae-Young and Shin, Yun-Soo and Park, Sung-Eun and Yu, Tae-U and Hwang, Jungho},
abstractNote = {As a direct write technology, the electrohydrodynamic printing of silver nanoparticles by using a focused nanocolloid jet is introduced. In this letter, two categorized types of examples of two-dimensional patterning were printed by using the electrohydrodynamic printing method. A spiral-type inductor was printed to demonstrate the feasibility of the electrohydrodynamic printing as a fabrication process. The printed spiral inductor produced 9.45 {mu}H and exhibited approximately five times larger resistivity (9.5 {mu}{omega} cm) than that of bulk silver after the sintering process. Then, complex geometries having square- and round-shape patterns were also printed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2645078},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 19 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Feb 19 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Fundamental understanding of the self-assembly of domains in block-copolymers (BCPs) and capabilities in control of these processes are important for their use as nanoscale templates in various applications. This paper focuses on the self-assembly of spin-cast and printed poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) BCPs on patterned surface wetting layers formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing of random copolymer brushes. Here, end-grafted brushes that present groups of styrene and methyl methacrylate in geometries with nanoscale resolution deterministically define the morphologies of BCP nanostructures. The materials and methods can also be integrated with lithographically defined templates for directed self-assembly of BCPs at multiple length scales. Themore » results provide not only engineering routes to controlled formation of complex patterns but also vehicles for experimental and simulation studies of the effects of chemical transitions on the processes of self-assembly. Importantly, we show that the methodology developed here also provides the means to explore exotic phenomena displayed by the wetting behavior of BCPs, where 3-D soft confinement, chain elasticity, interfacial energies and substrate's surface energy cooperate such that these melts are expected to exhibit non- classical wetting behavior.« less
  • We report that hyper-Rayleigh scattering, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering, and two-photon excited luminescence occur intermittently by focusing a continuous-wave near-infrared (cw-NIR) laser into a colloidal silver solution including rhodamine 6G (R6G) and sodium chloride (NaCl). On the other hand, continuous hyper-Rayleigh scattering is observed from colloidal silver free from R6G and NaCl, demonstrating that hyper-Raman scattering and two-photon excited luminescence are attributed to R6G and their intermittent features are dependent on the colloidal dispersion. These results suggest that the cw-NIR laser has three roles; the source of the nonlinear response, optical trapping of nanoparticles, and making nanoparticle aggregates possessing the highmore » activity for the nonlinear response.« less
  • A method to fabricate polymer field-effect transistors with submicron channel lengths is described. A thin polymer film is spin coated on a prepatterned resist with a low resolution to create a thickness contrast in the overcoated polymer layer. After plasma and solvent etching, a submicron-sized line structure, which templates the contour of the prepattern, is obtained. A further lift-off process is applied to define source-drain electrodes of transistors. With a combination of ink-jet printing, transistors with channel length down to 400 nm have been fabricated by this method. We show that drive current density increases as expected, while the on/offmore » current ratio 10{sup 6} is achieved.« less
  • In materials printing applications, the ability to generate fine droplets is critical for achieving high-resolution features. Other desirable characteristics are high print speeds, large stand-off distances, and minimal instrumentation requirements. In this work, a tunable electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing technique capable of generating micron-sized droplets is reported. This method was used to print organic resistors on flat and uneven substrates. These ubiquitous electronic components were built using the commercial polymer-based conductive ink poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), which has been widely used in the manufacturing of organic electronic devices. Resistors with widths from 50 to 500 μm and resistances from 1 to 70 Ω/μm weremore » created. An array of emission modes for EHD printing was identified. Among these, the most promising is the microdripping mode, where droplets 10 times smaller than the nozzle's inner diameter were created at frequencies in excess of 5 kHz. It was found that the ink flow rate, applied voltage, and stand-off distance all significantly influence the droplet generation frequency. In particular, the experimental results reveal that the frequency increases nonlinearly with the applied voltage. The non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior of PEDOT:PSS strongly influenced the droplet frequency. Finally, the topology of a 3-dimensional target substrate had a significant effect on the structure and function of a printed resistor.« less
  • We report on an improved Focused Electron Beam Induced Etching (FEBIE) process, which exploits heated oxygen delivery via a continuous supersonic micro-jet resulting in faster graphene patterning and better etch feature definition. Positioning a micro-jet in close proximity to a graphene surface with minimal jet spreading due to a continuous regime of gas flow at the exit of the 10 μm inner diameter capillary allows for focused exposure of the surface to reactive oxygen at high mass flux and impingement energy of a supersonic gas stream localized to a small etching area exposed to electron beam. These unique benefits ofmore » focused supersonic oxygen delivery to the surface enable a dramatic increase in the etch rate of graphene with no parasitic carbon “halo” deposition due to secondary electrons from backscattered electrons (BSE) in the area surrounding the etched regions. Increase of jet temperature via local nozzle heating provides means for enhancing kinetic energy of impinging oxygen molecules, which further speed up the etch, thus minimizing the beam exposure time and required electron dose, before parasitic carbon film deposition due to BSE mediated decomposition of adsorbed hydrocarbon contaminants has a measurable impact on quality of graphene etched features. Interplay of different physical mechanisms underlying an oxygen micro-jet assisted FEBIE process is discussed with support from experimental observations.« less