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Title: Investigation of binary compounds using electron Rutherford backscattering

Abstract

High-energy (40 keV) electrons, scattering over large angles, transfer a small fraction of their kinetic energy to the target atoms, in the same way as ions do in Rutherford backscattering experiments. The authors show here that this energy transfer can be resolved and used to determine the mass of the scattering atom. In this way information on the surface composition for thicknesses of the order of 10 nm can be obtained. The authors refer to this technique as 'electron Rutherford backscattering'. In addition the peak width reveals unique information about the vibrational properties (mean kinetic energy) of the scattering atoms. Here the authors demonstrate that the method can be used to identify a number of technologically important compounds.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20971824
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2535986; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BACKSCATTERING; ELECTRON BEAMS; ENERGY TRANSFER; INDIUM COMPOUNDS; KINETIC ENERGY; MOLYBDENUM COMPOUNDS; RUTHERFORD BACKSCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SILICON COMPOUNDS

Citation Formats

Went, M. R., and Vos, M. Investigation of binary compounds using electron Rutherford backscattering. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2535986.
Went, M. R., & Vos, M. Investigation of binary compounds using electron Rutherford backscattering. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2535986.
Went, M. R., and Vos, M. Mon . "Investigation of binary compounds using electron Rutherford backscattering". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2535986.
@article{osti_20971824,
title = {Investigation of binary compounds using electron Rutherford backscattering},
author = {Went, M. R. and Vos, M.},
abstractNote = {High-energy (40 keV) electrons, scattering over large angles, transfer a small fraction of their kinetic energy to the target atoms, in the same way as ions do in Rutherford backscattering experiments. The authors show here that this energy transfer can be resolved and used to determine the mass of the scattering atom. In this way information on the surface composition for thicknesses of the order of 10 nm can be obtained. The authors refer to this technique as 'electron Rutherford backscattering'. In addition the peak width reveals unique information about the vibrational properties (mean kinetic energy) of the scattering atoms. Here the authors demonstrate that the method can be used to identify a number of technologically important compounds.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2535986},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 7,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 12 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Feb 12 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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