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Title: Acute tumor vascular effects following fractionated radiotherapy in human lung cancer: In vivo whole tumor assessment using volumetric perfusion computed tomography

Abstract

Purpose: To quantitatively assess the in vivo acute vascular effects of fractionated radiotherapy for human non-small-cell lung cancer using volumetric perfusion computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, undergoing palliative radiotherapy delivering 27 Gy in 6 fractions over 3 weeks, were scanned before treatment, and after the second (9 Gy), fourth (18 Gy), and sixth (27 Gy) radiation fraction. Using 16-detector CT, multiple sequential volumetric acquisitions were acquired after intravenous contrast agent injection. Measurements of vascular blood volume and permeability for the whole tumor volume were obtained. Vascular changes at the tumor periphery and center were also measured. Results: At baseline, lung tumor vascularity was spatially heterogeneous with the tumor rim showing a higher vascular blood volume and permeability than the center. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vascular blood volume increased by 31.6% (paired t test, p = 0.10), 49.3% (p = 0.034), and 44.6% (p = 0.0012) respectively at the tumor rim, and 16.4% (p = 0.29), 19.9% (p = 0.029), and 4.0% (p = 0.0050) respectively at the center of the tumor. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vessel permeability increased by 18.4% (p =more » 0.022), 44.8% (p = 0.0048), and 20.5% (p = 0.25) at the tumor rim. The increase in permeability at the tumor center was not significant after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Fractionated radiotherapy increases tumor vascular blood volume and permeability in human non-small-cell lung cancer. We have established the spatial distribution of vascular changes after radiotherapy; greater vascular changes were demonstrated at the tumor rim compared with the center.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Marie Curie Research Wing, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom)
  2. Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom)
  3. Marie Curie Research Wing, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). E-mail: peterhoskin@nhs.net
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20944682
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.005; PII: S0360-3016(06)03246-9; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD; CARCINOMAS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CONTRAST MEDIA; IN VIVO; LUNGS; RADIOTHERAPY; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Ng, Q.-S., Goh, Vicky, Milner, Jessica, Padhani, Anwar R., Saunders, Michele I., and Hoskin, Peter J. Acute tumor vascular effects following fractionated radiotherapy in human lung cancer: In vivo whole tumor assessment using volumetric perfusion computed tomography. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.005.
Ng, Q.-S., Goh, Vicky, Milner, Jessica, Padhani, Anwar R., Saunders, Michele I., & Hoskin, Peter J. Acute tumor vascular effects following fractionated radiotherapy in human lung cancer: In vivo whole tumor assessment using volumetric perfusion computed tomography. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.005.
Ng, Q.-S., Goh, Vicky, Milner, Jessica, Padhani, Anwar R., Saunders, Michele I., and Hoskin, Peter J. Thu . "Acute tumor vascular effects following fractionated radiotherapy in human lung cancer: In vivo whole tumor assessment using volumetric perfusion computed tomography". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.005.
@article{osti_20944682,
title = {Acute tumor vascular effects following fractionated radiotherapy in human lung cancer: In vivo whole tumor assessment using volumetric perfusion computed tomography},
author = {Ng, Q.-S. and Goh, Vicky and Milner, Jessica and Padhani, Anwar R. and Saunders, Michele I. and Hoskin, Peter J.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To quantitatively assess the in vivo acute vascular effects of fractionated radiotherapy for human non-small-cell lung cancer using volumetric perfusion computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, undergoing palliative radiotherapy delivering 27 Gy in 6 fractions over 3 weeks, were scanned before treatment, and after the second (9 Gy), fourth (18 Gy), and sixth (27 Gy) radiation fraction. Using 16-detector CT, multiple sequential volumetric acquisitions were acquired after intravenous contrast agent injection. Measurements of vascular blood volume and permeability for the whole tumor volume were obtained. Vascular changes at the tumor periphery and center were also measured. Results: At baseline, lung tumor vascularity was spatially heterogeneous with the tumor rim showing a higher vascular blood volume and permeability than the center. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vascular blood volume increased by 31.6% (paired t test, p = 0.10), 49.3% (p = 0.034), and 44.6% (p = 0.0012) respectively at the tumor rim, and 16.4% (p = 0.29), 19.9% (p = 0.029), and 4.0% (p = 0.0050) respectively at the center of the tumor. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vessel permeability increased by 18.4% (p = 0.022), 44.8% (p = 0.0048), and 20.5% (p = 0.25) at the tumor rim. The increase in permeability at the tumor center was not significant after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Fractionated radiotherapy increases tumor vascular blood volume and permeability in human non-small-cell lung cancer. We have established the spatial distribution of vascular changes after radiotherapy; greater vascular changes were demonstrated at the tumor rim compared with the center.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.10.005},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the magnitudes of the changes in mobility and volume of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors during radiotherapy, using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: Five to ten 4DCT data sets were acquired weekly for each of 8 patients throughout treatment. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were outlined on each data set. Volumes and coordinates of the GTV centroids were calculated at the 0 (end-inspiration) and 50% (end-expiration) respiration phases. Trends in magnitudes of intrafraction and interfraction positional variations were assessed for the GTV and internal target volume (ITV) during treatment. Results: Tumor volume reduction rangedmore » from 20% to 71% (end-inspiration) and from 15% to 70% (end-expiration). Increased tumor mobility was observed in the superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions. However, no trends in tumor motion were observed. Motion along the superior-inferior direction was significantly greater (p < 0.001), with mean {+-} SD values of 0.86 {+-} 0.19 cm, as compared with 0.39 {+-} 0.08 cm and 0.19 {+-} 0.05 cm in the anterior-posterior and right-left directions, respectively. A marginally significant (p = 0.049) increase in total GTV positional variation was observed with increasing treatment weeks, and similar results were seen for the interfractional ITV mobility. Conclusions: Because of changes in tumor size and mobility, an explicit initial determination of the ITV may not be sufficient, especially where small setup margins are used. Repeat 4DCT scans might be warranted for highly mobile tumors to reduce the potential for missing the tumor.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate pulmonary radiologic changes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), to distinguish between mass-like fibrosis and tumor recurrence. Methods and Materials: Eighty consecutive patients treated with 3- to 5-fraction SBRT for early-stage peripheral non-small cell lung cancer with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were reviewed. The mean biologic equivalent dose received was 150 Gy (range, 78-180 Gy). Patients were followed with serial CT imaging every 3 months. The CT appearance of consolidation was defined as diffuse or mass-like. Progressive disease on CT was defined according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Positron emission tomography (PET)more » CT was used as an adjunct test. Tumor recurrence was defined as a standardized uptake value equal to or greater than the pretreatment value. Biopsy was used to further assess consolidation in select patients. Results: Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 12.0-36.0 months). Abnormal mass-like consolidation was identified in 44 patients (55%), whereas diffuse consolidation was identified in 12 patients (15%), at a median time from end of treatment of 10.3 months and 11.5 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence was found in 35 of 44 patients with mass-like consolidation using CT alone. Combined with PET, 10 of the 44 patients had tumor recurrence. Tumor size (hazard ratio 1.12, P=.05) and time to consolidation (hazard ratio 0.622, P=.03) were predictors for tumor recurrence. Three consecutive increases in volume and increasing volume at 12 months after treatment in mass-like consolidation were highly specific for tumor recurrence (100% and 80%, respectively). Patients with diffuse consolidation were more likely to develop grade {>=}2 pneumonitis (odds ratio 26.5, P=.02) than those with mass-like consolidation (odds ratio 0.42, P=.07). Conclusion: Incorporating the kinetics of mass-like consolidation and PET to the current criteria for evaluating posttreatment response will increase the likelihood of correctly identifying patients with progressive disease after lung SBRT.« less
  • To evaluate the change in volume and movement of the parotid gland measured by serial contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans in patients with head and neck cancer treated with parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). A prospective study was performed on 13 patients with head and neck cancer undergoing dose-painted IMRT to 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions. Serial computed tomography scans were performed at baseline, weeks 2, 4, and 6 of radiotherapy (RT), and at 6 weeks post-RT. The parotid volume was contoured at each scan, and the movement of the medial and lateral borders was measured. The patient's body weight was recordedmore » at each corresponding week during RT. Regression analyses were performed to ascertain the rate of change during treatment as a percent change per fraction in parotid volume and distance relative to baseline. The mean parotid volume decreased by 37.3% from baseline to week 6 of RT. The overall rate of change in parotid volume during RT was−1.30% per fraction (−1.67% and−0.91% per fraction in≥31 Gy and<31 Gy mean planned parotid dose groups, respectively, p = 0.0004). The movement of parotid borders was greater in the≥31 Gy mean parotid dose group compared with the<31 Gy group (0.22% per fraction and 0.14% per fraction for the lateral border and 0.19% per fraction and 0.06% per fraction for the medial border, respectively). The median change in body weight was−7.4% (range, 0.75% to−17.5%) during RT. A positive correlation was noted between change in body weight and parotid volume during the course of RT (Spearman correlation coefficient, r = 0.66, p<0.01). Head and neck IMRT results in a volume loss of the parotid gland, which is related to the planned parotid dose, and the patient's weight loss during RT.« less
  • Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion withmore » various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze both the intratumoral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and perfusion within rectal tumors before and after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Rectal cancer patients, referred for preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT), underwent FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) and perfusion-CT (pCT) imaging before the start of hypofractionated RT and at the day of the last RT fraction. The pCT-images were analyzed using the extended Kety model, quantifying tumor perfusion with the pharmacokinetic parameters K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and v{sub p}. The mean and maximum FDG uptake based on the standardized uptake value (SUV) andmore » transfer constant (K{sup trans}) within the tumor were correlated. Also, the tumor was subdivided into eight subregions and for each subregion the mean and maximum SUVs and K{sup trans} values were assessed and correlated. Furthermore, the mean FDG uptake in voxels presenting with the lowest 25% of perfusion was compared with the FDG uptake in the voxels with the 25% highest perfusion. Results: The mean and maximum K{sup trans} values were positively correlated with the corresponding SUVs ({rho} = 0.596, p = 0.001 and {rho} = 0.779, p < 0.001). Also, positive correlations were found for K{sup trans} values and SUVs within the subregions (mean, {rho} = 0.413, p < 0.001; and max, {rho} = 0.540, p < 0.001). The mean FDG uptake in the 25% highest-perfused tumor regions was significantly higher compared with the 25% lowest-perfused regions (10.6% {+-} 5.1%, p = 0.017). During hypofractionated radiotherapy, stable mean (p = 0.379) and maximum (p = 0.280) FDG uptake levels were found, whereas the mean (p = 0.040) and maximum (p = 0.003) K{sup trans} values were found to significantly increase. Conclusion: Highly perfused rectal tumors presented with higher FDG-uptake levels compared with relatively low perfused tumors. Also, intratumor regions with a high FDG uptake demonstrated with higher levels of perfusion than regions with a relatively low FDG-uptake. Early after hypofractionated RT, stable FDG uptake levels were found, whereas tumor perfusion was found to significantly increase.« less